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5-Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid

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Cindy Laukes – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Relationship of generalized anxiety symptoms to urinary 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid and vanillylmandelic Acid
    Psychiatry research, 1995
    Co-Authors: Michael J. Garvey, Russell Noyes, Catherine Woodman, Cindy Laukes

    Abstract:

    Urinary levels of the serotonin metabolite 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid (5-HIAA) and the norepinephrine metabolite vanillylmandelic Acid (VMA) were measured in 45 patients with generalized anxiety disorder. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the severity of several anxiety symptoms was predicted by levels of 5-HIAA and VMA. These data are consistent with the proposal that serotonin and norepinephrine may be involved in the pathophysiology of anxiety.

  • The association of urinary 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid and vanillylmandelic Acid in patients with generalized anxiety
    Neuropsychobiology, 1995
    Co-Authors: Michael J. Garvey, Russell Noyes, Catherine Woodman, Cindy Laukes

    Abstract:

    There is evidence that serotonin and norepinephrine are in some way involved in the pathophysiology of anxiety disorders. Urinary levels of the serotonin metabolite 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid (5-HIAA) and the norepinephrine metabolite vanillylmandelic Acid (VMA) were measured in 46 patients with generalized anxiety disorder. There was a significant association between urinary levels of 5-HIAA and VMA: r = 0.79; p = 0.0001. Possible implications of this finding are discussed.

Michael H. Ebert – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Altered serotonin activity in anorexia nervosa after long-term weight restoration. Does elevated cerebrospinal fluid 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid level correlate with rigid and obsessive behavior?
    Archives of general psychiatry, 1991
    Co-Authors: Walter H. Kaye, David T. George, Harry E. Gwirtsman, Michael H. Ebert

    Abstract:

    To avoid the confounding influences of malnutrition or weight loss, we studied patients with anorexia nervosa at normal weight and stable dietary intake. Compared with 15 controls, 17 long-term weight-restored anorectic subjects had elevated concentrations of cerebrospinal fluid 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid, the major serotonin metabolite, whereas levels of cerebrospinal fluid homovanillic Acid, the major dopamine metabolite, were normal. Elevated levels of cerebrospinal fluid 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid may indicate increased serotonin activity. Such activity could contribute to pathological feeding behavior. Most importantly, this study raises the question as to whether increased cerebrospinal fluid 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid levels are associated with overly inhibited, anxious, or obsessive traits.

  • Altered serotonin activity in anorexia nervosa after long-term weight restoration : does elevated cerebrospinal fluid 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid level correlate with rigid and obsessive behavior ?
    , 1991
    Co-Authors: Walter H. Kaye, David T. George, Harry E. Gwirtsman, Michael H. Ebert

    Abstract:

    To avoid the confounding influences of malnutrition or weight loss, we etudied patients with anorexia nervosa at normal weight and stable dietary intake. Compared with 15 controls, 17 long-term weight-restored anorectic subjects had elevated concentrations of cerebrospinal fluid 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid, the major serotonin metabolite, whereas levels of cerebrospinal fluid homovanillic Acid, the major dopamine metabolite, were normal. Elevated levels of cerebrospinal fluid 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid may indicate increased serotonin activity

Michael J. Garvey – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Relationship of generalized anxiety symptoms to urinary 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid and vanillylmandelic Acid
    Psychiatry research, 1995
    Co-Authors: Michael J. Garvey, Russell Noyes, Catherine Woodman, Cindy Laukes

    Abstract:

    Urinary levels of the serotonin metabolite 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid (5-HIAA) and the norepinephrine metabolite vanillylmandelic Acid (VMA) were measured in 45 patients with generalized anxiety disorder. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the severity of several anxiety symptoms was predicted by levels of 5-HIAA and VMA. These data are consistent with the proposal that serotonin and norepinephrine may be involved in the pathophysiology of anxiety.

  • The association of urinary 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid and vanillylmandelic Acid in patients with generalized anxiety
    Neuropsychobiology, 1995
    Co-Authors: Michael J. Garvey, Russell Noyes, Catherine Woodman, Cindy Laukes

    Abstract:

    There is evidence that serotonin and norepinephrine are in some way involved in the pathophysiology of anxiety disorders. Urinary levels of the serotonin metabolite 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid (5-HIAA) and the norepinephrine metabolite vanillylmandelic Acid (VMA) were measured in 46 patients with generalized anxiety disorder. There was a significant association between urinary levels of 5-HIAA and VMA: r = 0.79; p = 0.0001. Possible implications of this finding are discussed.