Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

14,000,000 Leading Edge Experts on the ideXlab platform

14,000,000

Leading Edge Experts

on the ideXlab platform

Adhesion

The Experts below are selected from a list of 1114419 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Adhesion - Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

William D Schlaff - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • expanded polytetrafluoroethylene gore tex surgical membrane is superior to oxidized regenerated cellulose interceed tc7 in preventing Adhesions
    Fertility and Sterility, 1995
    Co-Authors: A F Haney, John A Rock, John S Hesla, Bradley S Hurst, Michael L Kettel, Anna A Murphy, Guillermo Rowe, William D Schlaff
    Abstract:

    Objective To compare the impact of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE; Gore-Tex Surgical Membrane; W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc., Flagstaff, AZ) and oxidized regenerated cellulose (Interceed TC7, Johnson & Johnson Medical, Inc., Arlington, TX) on the development of postsurgical Adhesions. Design A multicenter, nonblinded, randomized clinical trial. Setting University medical centers. Interventions Each barrier was allocated randomly to the left or right sidewall of every patient. Patients Thirty-two women with bilateral pelvic sidewall Adhesions undergoing reconstructive surgery and second-look laparoscopy. Main Outcome Measures Adhesion score (on a 0- to 11-point scale), the area of Adhesion (cm 2 ), and the likelihood of no Adhesions. Results The use of both barriers was associated with a lower Adhesion score and area of Adhesion postoperatively. However, those sidewalls covered with PTFE had a significantly lower Adhesion score (0.97±0.30 versus 4.76±0.61 points, mean±SEM) and area of Adhesion (0.95±0.35 versus 3.25±0.62cm 2 ). Overall, more sidewalls covered with PTFE had no Adhesions (21 versus 7) and, when Adhesions were present on the contralateral sidewall, the number of sidewalls covered with PTFE without Adhesions was greater than those covered with oxidized regenerated cellulose (16 versus 2). Conclusion Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene was associated with fewer postsurgical Adhesions to the pelvic sidewall than oxidized regenerated cellulose.

  • Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (Gore-Tex Surgical Membrane*) is superior to oxidized regenerated cellulose (Interceed TC7 †) in preventing Adhesions‡§
    Fertility and Sterility, 1995
    Co-Authors: A F Haney, John A Rock, John S Hesla, Bradley S Hurst, Anna A Murphy, Guillermo Rowe, L. Michael Kettel, William D Schlaff
    Abstract:

    Objective To compare the impact of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE; Gore-Tex Surgical Membrane; W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc., Flagstaff, AZ) and oxidized regenerated cellulose (Interceed TC7, Johnson & Johnson Medical, Inc., Arlington, TX) on the development of postsurgical Adhesions. Design A multicenter, nonblinded, randomized clinical trial. Setting University medical centers. Interventions Each barrier was allocated randomly to the left or right sidewall of every patient. Patients Thirty-two women with bilateral pelvic sidewall Adhesions undergoing reconstructive surgery and second-look laparoscopy. Main Outcome Measures Adhesion score (on a 0- to 11-point scale), the area of Adhesion (cm 2 ), and the likelihood of no Adhesions. Results The use of both barriers was associated with a lower Adhesion score and area of Adhesion postoperatively. However, those sidewalls covered with PTFE had a significantly lower Adhesion score (0.97±0.30 versus 4.76±0.61 points, mean±SEM) and area of Adhesion (0.95±0.35 versus 3.25±0.62cm 2 ). Overall, more sidewalls covered with PTFE had no Adhesions (21 versus 7) and, when Adhesions were present on the contralateral sidewall, the number of sidewalls covered with PTFE without Adhesions was greater than those covered with oxidized regenerated cellulose (16 versus 2). Conclusion Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene was associated with fewer postsurgical Adhesions to the pelvic sidewall than oxidized regenerated cellulose.

Geoffrey Trew - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Postoperative abdominal Adhesions and their prevention in gynaecological surgery. Expert consensus position. Part 2—steps to reduce Adhesions
    Gynecological Surgery, 2007
    Co-Authors: Rudy Leon Dewilde, Geoffrey Trew
    Abstract:

    This consensus position represents the collective views of 35 gynaecologists with a recognised interest in Adhesions. The first part of the position was presented in the previous issue of Gynecological Surgery and reviewed the published literature on the extent of the problem of Adhesions. In this part, the opportunities to reduce their incidence are considered. Collective proposals on the actions that European gynaecologists should take to avoid causing Adhesions are provided. Importantly, in this part, the need to now inform patients of the risks associated with Adhesion-related complications during the consent process is discussed. With evidence increasing to support the efficacy of Adhesion-reduction agents to complement good surgical practice, all surgeons should act now to reduce Adhesions and fulfil their duty of care to patients.

  • Postoperative abdominal Adhesions and their prevention in gynaecological surgery. Expert consensus position
    Gynecological Surgery, 2007
    Co-Authors: Rudy Leon Dewilde, Geoffrey Trew
    Abstract:

    Adhesions are the most frequent complication of abdominopelvic surgery, yet many surgeons are still not aware of the extent of the problem and its serious consequences. While Adhesions may cause few or no detrimental effects to patients, in a considerable proportion of cases there are major short- and long-term consequences, including small-bowel obstruction, infertility and chronic pelvic pain. Adhesions complicate future surgery with important associated morbidity and expense—and a considerable risk of mortality. Despite advances in surgical techniques in recent years, the burden of Adhesion-related complications has not changed. Adhesions should now be considered the most common complication of abdominopelvic surgery. Adhesiolysis remains the main treatment, despite the fact that Adhesions reform in most patients. Developments in Adhesion-reduction strategies and new agents now offer a realistic possibility of reducing the risk of Adhesions forming and can improve the outcomes for patients and the associated onward burden. This consensus position represents the collective views of 35 gynaecologists with a recognised interest in Adhesions. The position is presented in two parts. The first part reviews the published literature on the extent of the problem of Adhesions, and the second part considers the opportunities to reduce their incidence. It also provides collective proposals on the actions that European gynaecologists should take to avoid causing Adhesions. Importantly it also advises that it is now time to inform patients of the risks associated with Adhesion-related complications during the consent process. With increasing evidence to support the efficacy of Adhesion-reduction agents to complement good surgical practice, all surgeons should act now to reduce Adhesions and fulfil their duty of care to patients.

  • Postoperative Adhesions and their prevention
    Reviews in Gynaecological and Perinatal Practice, 2006
    Co-Authors: Geoffrey Trew
    Abstract:

    Abstract This review provides an overview of the background evidence that has led to current recommendations on Adhesion reduction management. The extent, epidemiology and financial implications of abdominopelvic Adhesions and their related complications is discussed. Strategies for the prevention of Adhesions are presented including a review of current anti-Adhesion agents. Finally, the potential impact of progressing routine anti-Adhesion strategies and indeed the potential impact of not doing this are considered.

A F Haney - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • expanded polytetrafluoroethylene gore tex surgical membrane is superior to oxidized regenerated cellulose interceed tc7 in preventing Adhesions
    Fertility and Sterility, 1995
    Co-Authors: A F Haney, John A Rock, John S Hesla, Bradley S Hurst, Michael L Kettel, Anna A Murphy, Guillermo Rowe, William D Schlaff
    Abstract:

    Objective To compare the impact of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE; Gore-Tex Surgical Membrane; W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc., Flagstaff, AZ) and oxidized regenerated cellulose (Interceed TC7, Johnson & Johnson Medical, Inc., Arlington, TX) on the development of postsurgical Adhesions. Design A multicenter, nonblinded, randomized clinical trial. Setting University medical centers. Interventions Each barrier was allocated randomly to the left or right sidewall of every patient. Patients Thirty-two women with bilateral pelvic sidewall Adhesions undergoing reconstructive surgery and second-look laparoscopy. Main Outcome Measures Adhesion score (on a 0- to 11-point scale), the area of Adhesion (cm 2 ), and the likelihood of no Adhesions. Results The use of both barriers was associated with a lower Adhesion score and area of Adhesion postoperatively. However, those sidewalls covered with PTFE had a significantly lower Adhesion score (0.97±0.30 versus 4.76±0.61 points, mean±SEM) and area of Adhesion (0.95±0.35 versus 3.25±0.62cm 2 ). Overall, more sidewalls covered with PTFE had no Adhesions (21 versus 7) and, when Adhesions were present on the contralateral sidewall, the number of sidewalls covered with PTFE without Adhesions was greater than those covered with oxidized regenerated cellulose (16 versus 2). Conclusion Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene was associated with fewer postsurgical Adhesions to the pelvic sidewall than oxidized regenerated cellulose.

  • Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (Gore-Tex Surgical Membrane*) is superior to oxidized regenerated cellulose (Interceed TC7 †) in preventing Adhesions‡§
    Fertility and Sterility, 1995
    Co-Authors: A F Haney, John A Rock, John S Hesla, Bradley S Hurst, Anna A Murphy, Guillermo Rowe, L. Michael Kettel, William D Schlaff
    Abstract:

    Objective To compare the impact of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE; Gore-Tex Surgical Membrane; W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc., Flagstaff, AZ) and oxidized regenerated cellulose (Interceed TC7, Johnson & Johnson Medical, Inc., Arlington, TX) on the development of postsurgical Adhesions. Design A multicenter, nonblinded, randomized clinical trial. Setting University medical centers. Interventions Each barrier was allocated randomly to the left or right sidewall of every patient. Patients Thirty-two women with bilateral pelvic sidewall Adhesions undergoing reconstructive surgery and second-look laparoscopy. Main Outcome Measures Adhesion score (on a 0- to 11-point scale), the area of Adhesion (cm 2 ), and the likelihood of no Adhesions. Results The use of both barriers was associated with a lower Adhesion score and area of Adhesion postoperatively. However, those sidewalls covered with PTFE had a significantly lower Adhesion score (0.97±0.30 versus 4.76±0.61 points, mean±SEM) and area of Adhesion (0.95±0.35 versus 3.25±0.62cm 2 ). Overall, more sidewalls covered with PTFE had no Adhesions (21 versus 7) and, when Adhesions were present on the contralateral sidewall, the number of sidewalls covered with PTFE without Adhesions was greater than those covered with oxidized regenerated cellulose (16 versus 2). Conclusion Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene was associated with fewer postsurgical Adhesions to the pelvic sidewall than oxidized regenerated cellulose.

John G. Lock - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • reticular Adhesions are a distinct class of cell matrix Adhesions that mediate attachment during mitosis
    Nature Cell Biology, 2018
    Co-Authors: John G. Lock, Matthew Jones, Janet A Askari, Xiaowei Gong, Anna Oddone, Helene Olofsson, Sara Goransson, Melike Lakadamyali, Martin J Humphries
    Abstract:

    Adhesion to the extracellular matrix persists during mitosis in most cell types. However, while classical Adhesion complexes, such as focal Adhesions, do and must disassemble to enable mitotic rounding, the mechanisms of residual mitotic cell–extracellular matrix Adhesion remain undefined. Here, we identify ‘reticular Adhesions’, a class of Adhesion complex that is mediated by integrin αvβ5, formed during interphase, and preserved at cell–extracellular matrix attachment sites throughout cell division. Consistent with this role, integrin β5 depletion perturbs mitosis and disrupts spatial memory transmission between cell generations. Reticular Adhesions are morphologically and dynamically distinct from classical focal Adhesions. Mass spectrometry defines their unique composition, enriched in phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2)-binding proteins but lacking virtually all consensus adhesome components. Indeed, reticular Adhesions are promoted by PtdIns(4,5)P2, and form independently of talin and F-actin. The distinct characteristics of reticular Adhesions provide a solution to the problem of maintaining cell–extracellular matrix attachment during mitotic rounding and division.

  • reticular Adhesions a new class of Adhesion complex that mediates cell matrix attachment during mitosis
    bioRxiv, 2017
    Co-Authors: John G. Lock, Matthew Jones, Janet A Askari, Xiaowei Gong, Anna Oddone, Helene Olofsson, Sara Goransson, Melike Lakadamyali, Martin J Humphries, Staffan Strömblad
    Abstract:

    Adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) persists during mitosis in most cell types. Yet, classical Adhesion complexes (ACs), such as focal Adhesions and focal complexes, do and must disassemble to enable cytoskeletal rearrangements associated with mitotic rounding. Given this paradox, mechanisms of mitotic cell-ECM Adhesion remain undefined. Here, we identify "reticular Adhesions", a new class of AC that is mediated by integrin avb5, formed during interphase and preserved at cell-ECM attachment sites throughout cell division. Consistent with this role, integrin b5 depletion perturbs mitosis and disrupts spatial memory transmission between cell generations. Quantitative imaging reveals reticular Adhesions to be both morphologically and dynamically distinct from classic focal Adhesions, while mass spectrometry defines their unique composition; lacking virtually all consensus adhesome components. Indeed, remarkably, reticular Adhesions are functionally independent of both talin and F-actin, yet are promoted by phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI-4,5-P2). Overall, the distinct characteristics of reticular Adhesions provide a unique solution to the problem of maintaining cell-ECM attachment during mitotic rounding and division.

  • A plastic relationship between vinculin-mediated tension and Adhesion complex area defines Adhesion size and lifetime
    Nature Communications, 2015
    Co-Authors: Pablo Hernández-varas, Ulrich Berge, John G. Lock, Staffan Strömblad
    Abstract:

    Cell-matrix Adhesions may increase or decrease in size in response to tension; however, the factors determining which of these responses predominates remain unclear. Hernández-Varas et al . quantify the plastic relationship between Adhesion size and tension and use modelling to explain this behaviour. Cell-matrix Adhesions are central mediators of mechanotransduction, yet the interplay between force and Adhesion regulation remains unclear. Here we use live cell imaging to map time-dependent cross-correlations between vinculin-mediated tension and Adhesion complex area, revealing a plastic, context-dependent relationship. Interestingly, while an expected positive cross-correlation dominated in mid-sized Adhesions, small and large Adhesions display negative cross-correlation. Furthermore, although large changes in Adhesion complex area follow vinculin-mediated tension alterations, small increases in area precede vinculin-mediated tension dynamics. Modelling based on this mapping of the vinculin-mediated tension-Adhesion complex area relationship confirms its biological validity, and indicates that this relationship explains Adhesion size and lifetime limits, keeping Adhesions focal and transient. We also identify a subpopulation of steady-state Adhesions whose size and vinculin-mediated tension become stabilized, and whose disassembly may be selectively microtubule-mediated. In conclusion, we define a plastic relationship between vinculin-mediated tension and Adhesion complex area that controls fundamental cell-matrix Adhesion properties.

Margaret C Frame - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • E-cadherin-integrin crosstalk in cancer invasion and metastasis.
    Journal of cell science, 2013
    Co-Authors: Marta Canel, Margaret C Frame, Alan Serrels, Valerie G Brunton
    Abstract:

    E-cadherin is a single-pass transmembrane protein that mediates homophilic cell-cell interactions. Tumour progression is often associated with the loss of E-cadherin function and the transition to a more motile and invasive phenotype. This requires the coordinated regulation of both E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell Adhesions and integrin-mediated Adhesions that contact the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). Regulation of both types of Adhesion is dynamic as cells respond to external cues from the tumour microenvironment that regulate polarity, directional migration and invasion. Here, we review the mechanisms by which tumour cells control the cross-regulation between dynamic E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell Adhesions and integrin-mediated cell-matrix contacts, which govern the invasive and metastatic potential of tumours. In particular, we will discuss the role of the Adhesion-linked kinases Src, focal Adhesion kinase (FAK) and integrin-linked kinase (ILK), and the Rho family of GTPases.

  • the sh3 domain directs acto myosin dependent targeting of v src to focal Adhesions via phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase
    Molecular and Cellular Biology, 2000
    Co-Authors: Valerie J Fincham, Valerie G Brunton, Margaret C Frame
    Abstract:

    The dynamic regulation of the eukaryotic cell Adhesion network and cytoskeleton controls cell shape, adhesive strength, and dependent physiological processes such as cell motility. In addition, adhesive interactions themselves can contribute to cytoskeletal organization and, reciprocally, the cellular cytoskeleton can influence the assembly and function of cell interactions, including those mediated by both integrins and cadherins (48). Thus, the interplay between the assembly-disassembly cycles of cellular Adhesions and the cytoskeleton is both complex and crucial to the proper functioning of the cell. Although a great deal of information about the dynamic regulation of the Adhesion and cytoskeletal network has been gathered over the past decade (48), including the important role played by the Rho family of GTP-binding proteins (27), we still lack an understanding of the link between the biochemical regulators and the biophysical changes that lead to altered cell structure. Focal Adhesions are specialized structures where cells contact the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) (6, 7, 33). They consist of clustered integrin heterodimers, structural or cytoskeleton-associated proteins that link the ECM, through the integrins, to the actin cytoskeleton, and proteins involved in intracellular signal transduction (reviewed in reference 3). While it is well accepted that focal Adhesion structures are constantly being assembled, altered, and disassembled as cells move or respond to their extracellular environment, the mechanics of integrin clustering and focal Adhesion assembly and how these events are tightly controlled by biochemical signals within the cell remain to be established. One particularly complex relationship is that between focal Adhesion dynamics and tyrosine phosphorylation. On one hand, focal Adhesions can clearly form in the absence of detectable tyrosine phosphorylation of their components (19, 23), while on the other, agents that stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation often promote focal Adhesion formation (reviewed in reference 48). An explanation for these apparently paradoxical findings is that tyrosine phosphorylation at focal Adhesions is required for the assembly of signaling complexes, mediated in part by SH2 domain-phosphotyrosine interactions, but that assembly of focal Adhesion components into adhesive structures does not require tyrosine phosphorylation (reviewed in reference 48). Furthermore, for cells transformed by the v-Src tyrosine kinase there is abundant evidence that tyrosine phosphorylation of both structural and signaling proteins at focal Adhesions is linked to Adhesion disassembly and to disruption of the associated actin cytoskeleton; most likely, these effects are mediated by direct tyrosine phosphorylation of Adhesion components (8, 19, 20, 24, 28, 42) rather than via altered gene expression (4, 21). These tyrosine kinase-induced changes result in the loss of normal control of cell Adhesion and actin organization evident during oncogenic transformation and lead to deregulation of processes that are dependent on these cellular structures. In order to understand further the regulation of focal Adhesion assembly, we have studied the intracellular targeting of a v-Src protein that is temperature dependent (ts) for both focal Adhesion targeting and transformation. This molecular tool allows the conditional assembly of focal Adhesions in which v-Src is present and has enabled us to address the molecular determinants and features of the assembly process. Specifically, at the nonpermissive temperature, the ts LA29 v-Src protein locates around the perinuclear region of the cell (17, 18). Upon activation by a switch to the permissive temperature, v-Src colocalizes with actin stress fibers and is assembled into focal Adhesions by a process that is dependent on the activity of Rho family proteins and the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton (17, 18). Other focal Adhesion components, including focal Adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin, colocalize with v-Src as discrete protein complexes in the cell interior at early times after v-Src activation and in focal Adhesions at the cell periphery at later times, indicating that v-Src is coassembled with these proteins into peripheral Adhesions (17). To study the structural determinants of v-Src translocation, we used mutant derivatives of ts LA29 v-Src that were constitutively kinase inactive or myristylation defective to demonstrate that neither catalytic activity nor N-terminal myristylation is required for the assembly of v-Src into focal Adhesions (17). However, both tyrosine kinase activity and myristylation-mediated membrane association are required for v-Src-induced focal Adhesion turnover during transformation and cell motility (17). In this study, we demonstrate that inactive v-Src is apparently constrained in the perinuclear region of the cell by the microtubule network. Upon activation, this constraint is removed and v-Src associates with polymerized actin and is assembled into focal Adhesions at the cell periphery, events that normally require the integrity of the SH3 domain of v-Src, its association with phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase, and myosin-induced bundling of actin filaments.

  • the catalytic activity of src is dispensable for translocation to focal Adhesions but controls the turnover of these structures during cell motility
    The EMBO Journal, 1998
    Co-Authors: Valerie J Fincham, Margaret C Frame
    Abstract:

    The Src family of protein tyrosine kinases is involved in transducing signals at sites of cellular Adhesion. In particular, the v-Src oncoprotein resides in cellular focal Adhesions, where it induces tyrosine phosphorylation of pp125FAK and focal Adhesion loss during transformation. v-Src is translocated to cellular focal Adhesions by an actin-dependent process. Here we have used mutant v-Src proteins that are temperature-dependent for translocation, but with secondary mutations that render them constitutively kinase-inactive or myristylation-defective, to show that neither v-Src kinase activity nor a myristyl group are required to induce association of v-Src with actin stress fibres and redistribution to sites of focal Adhesions at the stress fibre termini. Moreover, switching the constitutively kinase-inactive or myristylation-defective temperature-sensitive v-Src proteins to the permissive temperature resulted in concomitant association with tyrosine-phosphorylated focal Adhesion kinase (pp125FAK) and redistribution of both to focal Adhesions. However, both catalytic activity and myristylation-mediated membrane association are required to induce dissociation of pp125FAK from v-Src, later degradation of pp125FAK and focal Adhesion turnover during transformation and cell motility. These observations provide strong evidence that the role of the tyrosine kinase activity of the Src family at sites of cellular focal Adhesions is to regulate the turnover of these structures during cell motility.