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Cerevisiae

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Cerevisiae - Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Eladio Barrio - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • dominance of wine saccharomyces Cerevisiae strains over s kudriavzevii in industrial fermentation competitions is related to an acceleration of nutrient uptake and utilization
    Environmental Microbiology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Javier Alonsodelreal, Eladio Barrio, Amparo Querol, Roberto Pereztorrado
    Abstract:

    Grape must is a sugar-rich habitat for a complex microbiota which is replaced by Saccharomyces Cerevisiae strains during the first fermentation stages. Interest on yeast competitive interactions has recently been propelled due to the use of alternative yeasts in the wine industry to respond to new market demands. The main issue resides in the persistence of these yeasts due to the specific competitive activity of S. Cerevisiae. To gather deeper knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved, we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis during fermentation carried out by a wine S. Cerevisiae strain and a strain representative of the cryophilic S. kudriavzevii, which exhibits high genetic and physiological similarities to S. Cerevisiae, but also differences of biotechnological interest. In this study, we report that transcriptomic response to the presence of a competitor is stronger in S. Cerevisiae than in S. kudriavzevii. Our results demonstrate that a wine S. Cerevisiae industrial strain accelerates nutrient uptake and utilization to outcompete the co-inoculated yeast, and that this process requires cell-to-cell contact to occur. Finally, we propose that this competitive phenotype evolved recently, during the adaptation of S. Cerevisiae to man-manipulated fermentative environments, since a non-wine S. Cerevisiae strain, isolated from a North American oak, showed a remarkable low response to competition.

  • effect of temperature on the prevalence of saccharomyces non Cerevisiae species against a s Cerevisiae wine strain in wine fermentation competition physiological fitness and influence in final wine composition
    Frontiers in Microbiology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Javier Alonsodelreal, Maria Laironperis, Eladio Barrio, Amparo Querol
    Abstract:

    Saccharomyces Cerevisiae is the main microorganism responsible for the fermentation of wine. Nevertheless, in the last years wineries are facing new challenges due to current market demands and climate change effects on the wine quality. New yeast starters formed by non-conventional Saccharomyces species (such as S. uvarum or S. kudriavzevii) or their hybrids (S. Cerevisiae x S. uvarum and S. Cerevisiae x S. kudriavzevii) can contribute to solve some of these challenges. They exhibit good fermentative capabilities at low temperatures, producing wines with lower alcohol and higher glycerol amounts. However, S. Cerevisiae can competitively displace other yeast species from wine fermentations, therefore the use of these new starters requires an analysis of their behavior during competition with S. Cerevisiae during wine fermentation. In the present study we analyzed the survival capacity of non-Cerevisiae strains in competition with S. Cerevisiae during fermentation of synthetic wine must at different temperatures. First, we developed a new method, based on QPCR, to quantify the proportion of different Saccharomyces yeasts in mixed cultures. This method was used to assess the effect of competition on the growth fitness. In addition, fermentation kinetics parameters and final wine compositions were also analyzed. We observed that some cryotolerant Saccharomyces yeasts, particularly S. uvarum, seriously compromised S. Cerevisiae fitness during competences at lower temperatures, which explains why S. uvarum can replace S. Cerevisiae during wine fermentations in European regions with oceanic and continental climates. From an enological point of view, mixed co-cultures between S. Cerevisiae and S. paradoxus or S. eubayanus, deteriorated fermentation parameters and the final product composition compared to single S. Cerevisiae inoculation. However, in co-inoculated synthetic must in which S. kudriavzevii or S. uvarum coexisted with S. Cerevisiae, there were fermentation performance improvements and the final wines contained less ethanol and higher amounts of glycerol. Finally, it is interesting to note that in co-inoculated fermentations, wine strains of S. Cerevisiae and S. uvarum performed better than non-wine strains of the same species.

Braulio Estevezarzoso - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the interaction between saccharomyces Cerevisiae and non saccharomyces yeast during alcoholic fermentation is species and strain specific
    Frontiers in Microbiology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Chunxiao Wang, Braulio Estevezarzoso
    Abstract:

    The present study analyzes the lack of culturability of different non-Saccharomyces strains due to interaction with Saccharomyces Cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation. Interaction was followed in mixed fermentations with 1:1 inoculation of S. Cerevisiae and ten non-Saccharomyces strains. Starmerella bacillaris and Torulaspora delbrueckii indicated longer coexistence in mixed fermentations compared with Hanseniaspora uvarum and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. Strain differences in culturability and nutrient consumption (glucose, alanine, ammonium, arginine or glutamine) were found within each species in mixed fermentation with S. Cerevisiae. The interaction was further analyzed using cell-free supernatant from S. Cerevisiae and synthetic media mimicking both single fermentations with S. Cerevisiae and using mixed fermentations with the corresponding non-Saccharomyces species. Cell-free S. Cerevisiae supernatants induced faster culturability loss than synthetic media corresponding to the same fermentation stage. This demonstrated that some metabolites produced by S. Cerevisiae played the main role in the decreased culturability of the other non-Saccharomyces yeasts. However, changes in the concentrations of main metabolites had also an effect. Culturability differences were observed among species and strains in culture assays and thus showed distinct tolerance to S. Cerevisiae metabolites and fermentation environment. Viability kit and recovery analyses on non-culturable cells verified the existence of viable but not-culturable status. These findings are discussed in the context of interaction between non-Saccharomyces and S. Cerevisiae.

  • effect of pure and mixed cultures of the main wine yeast species on grape must fermentations
    European Food Research and Technology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Imma Andorra, Albert Mas, M Berradre, Nicolas Rozes, Jose Manuel Guillamon, Braulio Estevezarzoso
    Abstract:

    Mixed inoculation of non-Saccharomyces yeasts and S. Cerevisiae is of interest for the wine industry for technological and sensory reasons. We have analysed how mixed inocula of the main non-Saccharomyces yeasts and S. Cerevisiae affect fermentation performance, nitrogen consumption and volatile compound production in a natural Macabeo grape must. Sterile must was fermented in triplicates and under the following six conditions: three pure cultures of S. Cerevisiae, Hanseniaspora uvarum and Candida zemplinina and the mixtures of H. uvarum:S. Cerevisiae (90:10), C. zemplinina:S. Cerevisiae (90:10) and H. uvarum:C. zemplinina:S. Cerevisiae (45:45:10). The presence of non-Saccharomyces yeasts slowed down the fermentations and produced higher levels of glycerol and acetic acid. Only the pure H. uvarum fermentations were unable to finish. Mixed fermentations consumed more of the available amino acids and were more complex and thus better able to synthesise volatile compounds. However, the amount of acetic acid was well above the admissible levels and compromises the immediate application of mixed cultures.

Jose Antonio Suarezlepe - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • influence of sequential fermentation with torulaspora delbrueckii and saccharomyces Cerevisiae on wine quality
    Lwt - Food Science and Technology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Iris Loira, Ricardo Vejarano, M A Banuelos, Antonio Morata, Wendu Tesfaye, C Uthurry, A Villa, I Cintora, Jose Antonio Suarezlepe
    Abstract:

    Abstract Torulaspora delbrueckii is a non-Saccharomyces yeast with interesting metabolic and physiological properties of potential use in oenology. This work examines the fermentative behaviour of five strains of T. delbrueckii in sequential fermentations with Saccharomyces Cerevisiae, analysing the formation of aromatic compounds, polyalcohols and pigments. The fermentative power of these five strains ranged between 7.6 and 9.0% v/v ethanol; the associated volatile acidity was 0.2–0.7 g/l acetic acid. The production of glycerol was inferior to that of S. Cerevisiae alone. The mean 2,3-butanediol concentration reached in single-culture S. Cerevisiae fermentations was 73% higher than in the five sequential T. delbrueckii/S. Cerevisiae fermentations. However, these fermentations produced larger quantities of diacetyl, ethyl lactate and 2-phenylethyl acetate than single-culture S. Cerevisiae fermentation. 3-ethoxy propanol was produced only in the sequential fermentations. The five sequential fermentations produced smaller quantities of vitisin A and B than single-culture S. Cerevisiae fermentation. In tests performed prior to the addition of the S. Cerevisiae in the sequential fermentations, none of the T. delbrueckii strains showed any extracellular hydroxycinnamate decarboxylase activity. They therefore produced no vinyl phenolic pyranoanthocyanins.

Umesh B. Deshannavar - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Performance of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Strains to Ferment Sugarcane Juice
    Asian Journal of Chemistry, 2019
    Co-Authors: Pallavi S. Patil, Umesh B. Deshannavar
    Abstract:

    In the present study, four Saccharomyces Cerevisiae strains S. Cerevisiae (NCIM 3200), S. Cerevisiae (NCIM 3045), S. Cerevisiae (baker′s yeast) and S. Cerevisiae (EC1118) have been used and compared for their capability to ferment sugars from the juice of sugarcane (of variety CO 86032) for production of sugarcane wine. The growth pattern of each strain was studied followed by the fermentation at optimized conditions such as pH and temperature. The strains′ potential to produce sugarcane wine has been compared in terms of their sugar consumption, alcohol production, titrable acidity and volatile acidity production with respect to permissible amounts given by Indian Regulations. Saccharomyces Cerevisiae (EC1118) performed better in fermentation among other compared Saccharomyces strains at the optimum temperature of 28 ºC, optimum pH 5, total soluble solids of 18 ºBrix and total sugar content of 185 g/L. Analysis of sugarcane wine fermented by Saccharomyces Cerevisiae (EC1118) has pH, 3.57, total alcohol content, 13.55 ± 1.77 %, titrable acidity, 8.30 ± 0.01 g/L and volatile acidity, 0.84 ± 0.00 g/L. The overall acceptability from sensory analysis supports the above physico-chemical analysis results of sugarcane wine.

Amparo Querol - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • dominance of wine saccharomyces Cerevisiae strains over s kudriavzevii in industrial fermentation competitions is related to an acceleration of nutrient uptake and utilization
    Environmental Microbiology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Javier Alonsodelreal, Eladio Barrio, Amparo Querol, Roberto Pereztorrado
    Abstract:

    Grape must is a sugar-rich habitat for a complex microbiota which is replaced by Saccharomyces Cerevisiae strains during the first fermentation stages. Interest on yeast competitive interactions has recently been propelled due to the use of alternative yeasts in the wine industry to respond to new market demands. The main issue resides in the persistence of these yeasts due to the specific competitive activity of S. Cerevisiae. To gather deeper knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved, we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis during fermentation carried out by a wine S. Cerevisiae strain and a strain representative of the cryophilic S. kudriavzevii, which exhibits high genetic and physiological similarities to S. Cerevisiae, but also differences of biotechnological interest. In this study, we report that transcriptomic response to the presence of a competitor is stronger in S. Cerevisiae than in S. kudriavzevii. Our results demonstrate that a wine S. Cerevisiae industrial strain accelerates nutrient uptake and utilization to outcompete the co-inoculated yeast, and that this process requires cell-to-cell contact to occur. Finally, we propose that this competitive phenotype evolved recently, during the adaptation of S. Cerevisiae to man-manipulated fermentative environments, since a non-wine S. Cerevisiae strain, isolated from a North American oak, showed a remarkable low response to competition.

  • effect of temperature on the prevalence of saccharomyces non Cerevisiae species against a s Cerevisiae wine strain in wine fermentation competition physiological fitness and influence in final wine composition
    Frontiers in Microbiology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Javier Alonsodelreal, Maria Laironperis, Eladio Barrio, Amparo Querol
    Abstract:

    Saccharomyces Cerevisiae is the main microorganism responsible for the fermentation of wine. Nevertheless, in the last years wineries are facing new challenges due to current market demands and climate change effects on the wine quality. New yeast starters formed by non-conventional Saccharomyces species (such as S. uvarum or S. kudriavzevii) or their hybrids (S. Cerevisiae x S. uvarum and S. Cerevisiae x S. kudriavzevii) can contribute to solve some of these challenges. They exhibit good fermentative capabilities at low temperatures, producing wines with lower alcohol and higher glycerol amounts. However, S. Cerevisiae can competitively displace other yeast species from wine fermentations, therefore the use of these new starters requires an analysis of their behavior during competition with S. Cerevisiae during wine fermentation. In the present study we analyzed the survival capacity of non-Cerevisiae strains in competition with S. Cerevisiae during fermentation of synthetic wine must at different temperatures. First, we developed a new method, based on QPCR, to quantify the proportion of different Saccharomyces yeasts in mixed cultures. This method was used to assess the effect of competition on the growth fitness. In addition, fermentation kinetics parameters and final wine compositions were also analyzed. We observed that some cryotolerant Saccharomyces yeasts, particularly S. uvarum, seriously compromised S. Cerevisiae fitness during competences at lower temperatures, which explains why S. uvarum can replace S. Cerevisiae during wine fermentations in European regions with oceanic and continental climates. From an enological point of view, mixed co-cultures between S. Cerevisiae and S. paradoxus or S. eubayanus, deteriorated fermentation parameters and the final product composition compared to single S. Cerevisiae inoculation. However, in co-inoculated synthetic must in which S. kudriavzevii or S. uvarum coexisted with S. Cerevisiae, there were fermentation performance improvements and the final wines contained less ethanol and higher amounts of glycerol. Finally, it is interesting to note that in co-inoculated fermentations, wine strains of S. Cerevisiae and S. uvarum performed better than non-wine strains of the same species.