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Ocular

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José Melena - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A comparative study of topical natural ergot alkaloids on the intraOcular pressure and aqueous humor dynamics in oclular normotensive and α-chymotrypsin-induced Ocular hypertensive rabbits
    Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology, 2007
    Co-Authors: Gustavo Puras, Manuel Garrido, Juan Santafé, José Segarra, José Melena
    Abstract:

    Background Although it has been suggested that ergot derivatives may play a role in antiglaucoma therapy, little attention has been paid to the Ocular hypotensive action of these drugs. Having previously reported that topical natural ergot alkaloids ergocristine α-ergocryptine and ergocornine dose-dependently reduce intraOcular pressure in Ocular normotensive and α-chymotrypsin-induced Ocular hypertensive rabbits, the aim of the present work was to compare the effect of ergocristine, α-ergocryptine and ergocornine on the intraOcular pressure and aqueous humor dynamics in Ocular normotensive and α-chymotrypsin-induced Ocular hypertensive rabbits, in order to further explore the Ocular actions of these compounds. Methods Experiments were conducted in albino Ocular normotensive and hypertensive rabbits by intracameral injection of α-chymotrypsin. IntraOcular pressure responses to drug vehicle and seven different doses of topical natural ergot alkaloids were examined, in order to obtain dose–response relationships for comparing the intraOcular pressure-lowering effect and potency of these drugs. Tonographies were also performed to ascertain the actions of natural ergot alkaloids on aqueous humor dynamics. Results All natural ergot alkaloids tested reduced intraOcular pressure in a dose-related fashion. The Ocular hypotensive effect was greater in α-chymotrypsin-induced Ocular hypertensive rabbits for the three compounds tested. All natural ergot alkaloids tested decreased both tonographic outflow facility and, to a greater extent, aqueous humor inflow in Ocular normotensive and in α-chymotrypsin-induced Ocular hypertensive rabbits. Conclusion Taken together, our data suggest that these compounds decrease both tonographic outflow facility and, to a greater extent, aqueous humor inflow, which explains their final effect in Ocular normotensive and in α-chymotrypsin-induced Ocular hypertensive rabbits. Reductions in aqueous humor inflow observed after topical application of natural ergot alkaloids in α-chymotrypsin-induced Ocular hypertensive rabbits can only be explained by a marked inhibition of active secretion of aqueous humor, since processes involved in aqueous humor formation may probably be altered after α-chymotrypsin injection.

  • A comparative study of topical natural ergot alkaloids on the intraOcular pressure and aqueous humor dynamics in oclular normotensive and α-chymotrypsin-induced Ocular hypertensive rabbits
    Graefes Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology, 2007
    Co-Authors: Gustavo Puras, Manuel Garrido, Juan Santafé, José Segarra, José Melena
    Abstract:

    Background Although it has been suggested that ergot derivatives may play a role in antiglaucoma therapy, little attention has been paid to the Ocular hypotensive action of these drugs. Having previously reported that topical natural ergot alkaloids ergocristine α-ergocryptine and ergocornine dose-dependently reduce intraOcular pressure in Ocular normotensive and α-chymotrypsin-induced Ocular hypertensive rabbits, the aim of the present work was to compare the effect of ergocristine, α-ergocryptine and ergocornine on the intraOcular pressure and aqueous humor dynamics in Ocular normotensive and α-chymotrypsin-induced Ocular hypertensive rabbits, in order to further explore the Ocular actions of these compounds.

  • aqueous humor dynamics in α chymotrypsin induced Ocular hypertensive rabbits
    Journal of Ocular Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 1999
    Co-Authors: José Melena, Jose Segarradomenech, Juan Santafé, Gustavo Puras
    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT Aqueous humor dynamics were studied in α-chymotrypsin-induced Ocular hypertensive rabbits either by tonographic or two-level constant pressure perfusion techniques. A significant correlation was obtained between the values of outflow facility in α-chymotrypsin-induced Ocular hypertensive rabbits as determined by tonography and constant pressure perfusion. The mean value of tonographic outflow facility in Ocular hypertensive rabbits was not statistically different from that found in Ocular normotensive rabbits. On the contrary, the estimated rate of aqueous inflow in Ocular hypertensive rabbits was about 1.5-fold higher than that of Ocular normotensive ones. While topical timolol lowered intraOcular pressure and aqueous humor inflow in Ocular hypertensive rabbits, pilocarpine did not produce any significant effect. Aqueous humor protein was significantly increased in Ocular hypertensive eyes. The results of this study show that accurate measurements of outflow facility can be obtained in α-chymotr...

Rothova Aniki - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • impact of Ocular graft versus host disease on visual quality of life in patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation questionnaire study
    Acta Ophthalmologica, 2014
    Co-Authors: Anjo Riemens, Liane Te Boome, Viera Kalinina Ayuso, Jonas J W Kuiper, Saskia M Imhof, Henk M Lokhorst, Rothova Aniki
    Abstract:

    Purpose: To determine the influence of Ocular complications on quality of life (QoL) 3 years after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). Methods: All 54 adult patients that underwent and survived allo-SCT in 2006 ⁄ 2007 in our centre received two questionnaires (VFQ-25: visual function questionnaire-25 and OSDI: Ocular surface disease index). In addition, the following data were included: gender, age, underlying disease, presence of chronic and ⁄ or Ocular graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), number of visits to an ophthalmologist, manifestations of dry eye disease, the duration of follow-up and treatment for Ocular GVHD. Results: Ocular GVHD developed in 26% (14 of 54) of patients and 71% (10 of 14) received treatment for Ocular GVHD. The presence of Ocular GVHD correlated with the severity of systemic GVHD (correlation coefficient: 0.52, p = 0.00). The Karnofsky scores were significantly lower in the patients with Ocular GVHD compared to the patients with no Ocular GVHD (p = 0.001). Karnofsky scores were weakly correlated with the severity of systemic GVHD (correlation coefficient: 0.25, p = 0.03. Three years after the all-SCT, OSDI and VFQ-25 scores were significantly impaired in patients with Ocular GVHD [mean: 76.5; range (46.1–100) and mean: 31.1; range (0–72.9)] compared to patients with no Ocular GVHD [mean: 89.4; range (45.2–100) and mean: 12.9; range (0–58.3); p = 0.02]. The scores of the VFQ-25 were significantly lower in the domains of general health, Ocular pain, social functioning and role difficulties. Conclusion: The long-term vision-related QoL measured by the OSDI and VFQ-25 was impaired in patients with Ocular GVHD.

M Muraine - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • risk factors for the development of Ocular complications of stevens johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis
    Archives of Dermatology, 2009
    Co-Authors: J Gueudry, Jeanclaude Roujeau, M Binaghi, Gisele Soubrane, M Muraine
    Abstract:

    Objectives To describe the acute and late Ocular manifestations of toxic epidermal necrosis (TEN), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), and overlap syndrome and to identify predictors for the development of Ocular complications. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting A single referral unit in a university hospital. Patients The study included 159 patients (mean [SD] age, 49.9 [19.8] years) with TEN and SJS during an 8-year period. Forty-nine patients were contacted at least 15 months after hospital discharge. Main Outcome Measures Records were reviewed for demographics, cause of the condition, and severity of Ocular involvement. The patients were contacted to assess late Ocular complications. Results A total of 117 patients (74%) had acute Ocular involvement, which was mild in 58%, moderate in 8%, and severe in 8%. Patients with TEN had more frequent (odds ratio [OR], 2.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-6.90; P  = .05) but not more severe (OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.20-4.5; P  = .99) acute Ocular involvement. Forty-nine patients were contacted at least 15 months after hospital discharge, and 63% had late Ocular complications. Dry eye syndrome was the most common. The mean (SD) Ocular Surface Disease Index score was 32.9 (30.3) (range, 0-97.5). The severity of the acute Ocular disease was found to be the only significant risk factor of late complications ( P  = .002), even though 5 patients without acute Ocular involvement developed dry eye syndrome. Conclusions Ocular involvement is common in patients with SJS and TEN. Late complications are more frequent in patients with severe initial eye involvement but may also develop in patients without patent initial Ocular symptoms.

Hyeshin Jeon - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Development of a questionnaire to identify Ocular torticollis
    European Journal of Pediatrics, 2020
    Co-Authors: Jin A. Yoon, Heeyoung Choi, Yong Beom Shin, Hyeshin Jeon
    Abstract:

    Ocular disease is one of the causes of abnormal head positioning. Conventionally, the behavioral characteristics of Ocular torticollis patients are different from those of non-Ocular torticollis patients, though research addressing the significance of this difference is yet limited. This prospective, cross-sectional study aims to develop a questionnaire based on the clinical features in children with abnormal head posture being Ocularly assessed. Children aged ≥ 6 months who visited our rehabilitation medicine clinic with a chief complaint of abnormal head posture were included. Patients with apparent orthopedic and neurological diseases were excluded. A 10-item questionnaire was developed to analyze the behavioral characteristics of patients. The patients were divided into Ocular and non-Ocular torticollis groups according to ophthalmologic examination results. Thirty-four and 13 patients were assigned to the non-Ocular torticollis and Ocular torticollis groups, respectively. Five questions were finally selected and the questionnaire was scored as the sum of the scores for the each questions (yes = 1 point, no = 0 point). The median (interquartile range) score of the Ocular torticollis group (3.0 (3.0–4.0)) was significantly higher than that of the non-Ocular torticollis group (2.0 (1.0–3.0); p = 0.000). Conclusion : Our parent-reported torticollis assessment questionnaire may be useful for screening Ocular torticollis. What is known: • Ocular disease is one of the various causes of abnormal head positioning. • The behavioral characteristics of patients with Ocular torticollis are different from those of patients with non-Ocular torticollis; research on this matter is limited . What is new: • We delveloped a questionnaire to differentiate Ocular and postural torticollis and the score of the questionnaire was different between patients with or without Ocular disease. • The questionnaire based on behavioral characteristics may help screening and determining the need of ophthalmic evaluation in patients with torticollis.

  • Development of a questionnaire to identify Ocular torticollis.
    European journal of pediatrics, 2020
    Co-Authors: Jin A. Yoon, Heeyoung Choi, Yong Beom Shin, Hyeshin Jeon
    Abstract:

    Ocular disease is one of the causes of abnormal head positioning. Conventionally, the behavioral characteristics of Ocular torticollis patients are different from those of non-Ocular torticollis patients, though research addressing the significance of this difference is yet limited. This prospective, cross-sectional study aims to develop a questionnaire based on the clinical features in children with abnormal head posture being Ocularly assessed. Children aged ≥ 6 months who visited our rehabilitation medicine clinic with a chief complaint of abnormal head posture were included. Patients with apparent orthopedic and neurological diseases were excluded. A 10-item questionnaire was developed to analyze the behavioral characteristics of patients. The patients were divided into Ocular and non-Ocular torticollis groups according to ophthalmologic examination results. Thirty-four and 13 patients were assigned to the non-Ocular torticollis and Ocular torticollis groups, respectively. Five questions were finally selected and the questionnaire was scored as the sum of the scores for the each questions (yes = 1 point, no = 0 point). The median (interquartile range) score of the Ocular torticollis group (3.0 (3.0–4.0)) was significantly higher than that of the non-Ocular torticollis group (2.0 (1.0–3.0); p = 0.000). Conclusion: Our parent-reported torticollis assessment questionnaire may be useful for screening Ocular torticollis.

W J Heng - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Ocular manifestations and complications of stevens johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis an asian series
    Allergy, 2007
    Co-Authors: Leonard W Yip, Bernard Yuhor Thong, J Lim, A W Tan, H B Wong, S Handa, W J Heng
    Abstract:

    Background:  To describe the acute and late Ocular manifestations and complications in toxic epidermal necrosis (TEN) and Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS), and identify predictors for development of late complications. Methods:  Cases of TEN and SJS during a 9-year period were included. Patients with Ocular involvement were reviewed for acute Ocular complications. Patients with a minimum 6 months follow-up were reviewed for late complications. Records were reviewed for their demographics, etiology, and severity of Ocular involvement. Results:  There were 117 patients with a mean age of 52.2 ± 18.6 years. Eighty-one of these (69%) had acute Ocular involvement. This was mild in 40%, moderate in 25% and severe in 4%. Adverse drug reactions were the predominant cause. Patients with thrombocytopenia had more severe acute Ocular involvement. Forty-four patients had a minimum 6 months of follow-up and half developed late complications. Severe dry eyes and trichiatic lashes were the commonest late complications. Patients treated with topical antibiotic were more likely to have late complications, particularly dry eyes. There was no difference in the severity of acute eye involvement or late complications when SJS and TEN patients were compared. The severity of the acute Ocular disease and abnormal laboratory tests were not found to be the significant risk factors of late complications. Conclusions:  Ocular involvement is common in SJS and TEN and can be severe and blinding. The severity of acute Ocular complications does not predict late complications. The diagnosis of TEN does not imply a more severe Ocular involvement or increased frequency of late Ocular complications compared with SJS. Care should be taken even in mild cases. Appropriate intervention during acute Ocular disease may prevent late complications.