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Photons

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Photons - Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Benjamin J. Sussman - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Frequency and bandwidth conversion of single Photons in a room-temperature diamond quantum memory
    Nature Communications, 2016
    Co-Authors: Kent A G Fisher, Jean Philippe W Maclean, Kevin J. Resch, Duncan G. England, Philip J. Bustard, Benjamin J. Sussman
    Abstract:

    The spectral manipulation of Photons is essential for linking components in a quantum network. Large frequency shifts are needed for conversion between optical and telecommunication frequencies, while smaller shifts are useful for frequency-multiplexing quantum systems, in the same way that wavelength division multiplexing is used in classical communications. Here we demonstrate frequency and bandwidth conversion of single Photons in a room-temperature diamond quantum memory. Heralded 723.5 nm Photons, with 4.1 nm bandwidth, are stored as optical phonons in the diamond via a Raman transition. Upon retrieval from the diamond memory, the spectral shape of the Photons is determined by a tunable read pulse through the reverse Raman transition. We report central frequency tunability over 4.2 times the input bandwidth, and bandwidth modulation between 0.5 and 1.9 times the input bandwidth. Our results demonstrate the potential for diamond, and Raman memories in general, as an integrated platform for photon storage and spectral conversion.

  • storage and retrieval of thz bandwidth single Photons using a room temperature diamond quantum memory
    Physical Review Letters, 2015
    Co-Authors: Duncan G. England, Kent A G Fisher, Jean Philippe W Maclean, Kevin J. Resch, Philip J. Bustard, Rune Lausten, Benjamin J. Sussman
    Abstract:

    : We report the storage and retrieval of single Photons, via a quantum memory, in the optical phonons of a room-temperature bulk diamond. The THz-bandwidth heralded Photons are generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion and mapped to phonons via a Raman transition, stored for a variable delay, and released on demand. The second-order correlation of the memory output is g((2))(0)=0.65±0.07, demonstrating a preservation of nonclassical photon statistics throughout storage and retrieval. The memory is low noise, high speed and broadly tunable; it therefore promises to be a versatile light-matter interface for local quantum processing applications.

Kevin J. Resch - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Frequency and bandwidth conversion of single Photons in a room-temperature diamond quantum memory
    Nature Communications, 2016
    Co-Authors: Kent A G Fisher, Jean Philippe W Maclean, Kevin J. Resch, Duncan G. England, Philip J. Bustard, Benjamin J. Sussman
    Abstract:

    The spectral manipulation of Photons is essential for linking components in a quantum network. Large frequency shifts are needed for conversion between optical and telecommunication frequencies, while smaller shifts are useful for frequency-multiplexing quantum systems, in the same way that wavelength division multiplexing is used in classical communications. Here we demonstrate frequency and bandwidth conversion of single Photons in a room-temperature diamond quantum memory. Heralded 723.5 nm Photons, with 4.1 nm bandwidth, are stored as optical phonons in the diamond via a Raman transition. Upon retrieval from the diamond memory, the spectral shape of the Photons is determined by a tunable read pulse through the reverse Raman transition. We report central frequency tunability over 4.2 times the input bandwidth, and bandwidth modulation between 0.5 and 1.9 times the input bandwidth. Our results demonstrate the potential for diamond, and Raman memories in general, as an integrated platform for photon storage and spectral conversion.

  • storage and retrieval of thz bandwidth single Photons using a room temperature diamond quantum memory
    Physical Review Letters, 2015
    Co-Authors: Duncan G. England, Kent A G Fisher, Jean Philippe W Maclean, Kevin J. Resch, Philip J. Bustard, Rune Lausten, Benjamin J. Sussman
    Abstract:

    : We report the storage and retrieval of single Photons, via a quantum memory, in the optical phonons of a room-temperature bulk diamond. The THz-bandwidth heralded Photons are generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion and mapped to phonons via a Raman transition, stored for a variable delay, and released on demand. The second-order correlation of the memory output is g((2))(0)=0.65±0.07, demonstrating a preservation of nonclassical photon statistics throughout storage and retrieval. The memory is low noise, high speed and broadly tunable; it therefore promises to be a versatile light-matter interface for local quantum processing applications.

  • experimental nonlinear sign shift for linear optics quantum computation
    Physical Review Letters, 2004
    Co-Authors: Kaoru Sanaka, Kevin J. Resch, Thomas Jennewein, Anton Zeilinger
    Abstract:

    We have realized the nonlinear sign shift operation for photonic qubits. This operation shifts the phase of two Photons reflected by a beam splitter using an extra single photon and measurement. We show that the conditional phase shift is � 1:05 � 0:06� � in clear agreement with theory. Our results show that, by using an ancilla photon and conditional detection, nonlinear optical effects can be implemented using only linear optical elements. This experiment represents an essential step for linear optical implementations of scalable quantum computation. A promising system for quantum computation is to use single Photons to encode quantum information [1,2]. This is due to the photon’s robustness against decoherence and the availability of single-qubit operations. However, it has been very difficult to achieve the necessary two-qubit operations since the physical interaction between Photons is much too small. Surprisingly, Knill, Laflamme, and Milburn (KLM) showed that effective nonlinear interactions can be implemented using only linear optical elements in conjunction with single-photon sources and conditional dynamics in such a way that scalable quantum computation can be achieved [3‐10]. The fundamental element of the KLM scheme is the nonlinear sign-shift (NS) operation from which the two-qubit conditional sign flip gate can be constructed. Universal quantum computation is then possible with this two-qubit gate together with all single-qubit rotations [11,12] Here, we experimentally demonstrate the NS operation using Photons produced via parametric down-conversion. In contrast with the KLM scheme, our method to observe the NS operates in the polarization basis and therefore does not require interferometric phase stability. A simplified version of NS operation is shown in

Kent A G Fisher - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Frequency and bandwidth conversion of single Photons in a room-temperature diamond quantum memory
    Nature Communications, 2016
    Co-Authors: Kent A G Fisher, Jean Philippe W Maclean, Kevin J. Resch, Duncan G. England, Philip J. Bustard, Benjamin J. Sussman
    Abstract:

    The spectral manipulation of Photons is essential for linking components in a quantum network. Large frequency shifts are needed for conversion between optical and telecommunication frequencies, while smaller shifts are useful for frequency-multiplexing quantum systems, in the same way that wavelength division multiplexing is used in classical communications. Here we demonstrate frequency and bandwidth conversion of single Photons in a room-temperature diamond quantum memory. Heralded 723.5 nm Photons, with 4.1 nm bandwidth, are stored as optical phonons in the diamond via a Raman transition. Upon retrieval from the diamond memory, the spectral shape of the Photons is determined by a tunable read pulse through the reverse Raman transition. We report central frequency tunability over 4.2 times the input bandwidth, and bandwidth modulation between 0.5 and 1.9 times the input bandwidth. Our results demonstrate the potential for diamond, and Raman memories in general, as an integrated platform for photon storage and spectral conversion.

  • storage and retrieval of thz bandwidth single Photons using a room temperature diamond quantum memory
    Physical Review Letters, 2015
    Co-Authors: Duncan G. England, Kent A G Fisher, Jean Philippe W Maclean, Kevin J. Resch, Philip J. Bustard, Rune Lausten, Benjamin J. Sussman
    Abstract:

    : We report the storage and retrieval of single Photons, via a quantum memory, in the optical phonons of a room-temperature bulk diamond. The THz-bandwidth heralded Photons are generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion and mapped to phonons via a Raman transition, stored for a variable delay, and released on demand. The second-order correlation of the memory output is g((2))(0)=0.65±0.07, demonstrating a preservation of nonclassical photon statistics throughout storage and retrieval. The memory is low noise, high speed and broadly tunable; it therefore promises to be a versatile light-matter interface for local quantum processing applications.

Duncan G. England - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Frequency and bandwidth conversion of single Photons in a room-temperature diamond quantum memory
    Nature Communications, 2016
    Co-Authors: Kent A G Fisher, Jean Philippe W Maclean, Kevin J. Resch, Duncan G. England, Philip J. Bustard, Benjamin J. Sussman
    Abstract:

    The spectral manipulation of Photons is essential for linking components in a quantum network. Large frequency shifts are needed for conversion between optical and telecommunication frequencies, while smaller shifts are useful for frequency-multiplexing quantum systems, in the same way that wavelength division multiplexing is used in classical communications. Here we demonstrate frequency and bandwidth conversion of single Photons in a room-temperature diamond quantum memory. Heralded 723.5 nm Photons, with 4.1 nm bandwidth, are stored as optical phonons in the diamond via a Raman transition. Upon retrieval from the diamond memory, the spectral shape of the Photons is determined by a tunable read pulse through the reverse Raman transition. We report central frequency tunability over 4.2 times the input bandwidth, and bandwidth modulation between 0.5 and 1.9 times the input bandwidth. Our results demonstrate the potential for diamond, and Raman memories in general, as an integrated platform for photon storage and spectral conversion.

  • storage and retrieval of thz bandwidth single Photons using a room temperature diamond quantum memory
    Physical Review Letters, 2015
    Co-Authors: Duncan G. England, Kent A G Fisher, Jean Philippe W Maclean, Kevin J. Resch, Philip J. Bustard, Rune Lausten, Benjamin J. Sussman
    Abstract:

    : We report the storage and retrieval of single Photons, via a quantum memory, in the optical phonons of a room-temperature bulk diamond. The THz-bandwidth heralded Photons are generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion and mapped to phonons via a Raman transition, stored for a variable delay, and released on demand. The second-order correlation of the memory output is g((2))(0)=0.65±0.07, demonstrating a preservation of nonclassical photon statistics throughout storage and retrieval. The memory is low noise, high speed and broadly tunable; it therefore promises to be a versatile light-matter interface for local quantum processing applications.

Sven Höfling - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Quantum State Transfer from a Single Photon to a Distant Quantum-Dot Electron Spin
    Physical Review Letters, 2017
    Co-Authors: Yu. He, Chao Yang Lu, Yu Ming He, Yu Jia Wei, Jian-wei Pan, Martin Kamp, Christian Schneider, Kai Chen, Xiao Jiang, Sven Höfling
    Abstract:

    Quantum state transfer from flying Photons to stationary matter qubits is an important element in the realization of quantum networks. Self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots provide a promising solid-state platform hosting both single photon and spin, with an inherent light-matter interface. Here, we develop a method to coherently and actively control the single-photon frequency bins in superposition using electro-optic modulators, and measure the spin-photon entanglement with a fidelity of $0.796\pm0.020$. Further, by Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type state projection on the frequency, path and polarization degrees of freedom of a single photon, we demonstrate quantum state transfer from a single photon to a single electron spin confined in an InGaAs quantum dot, separated by 5 meters. The quantum state mapping from the photon's polarization to the electron's spin is demonstrated along three different axis on the Bloch sphere, with an average fidelity of $78.5\%$.

  • Two-photon interference at telecom wavelengths for time-bin-encoded single Photons from quantum-dot spin qubits
    Nature Communications, 2015
    Co-Authors: Leo Yu, Michael G. Tanner, Eisuke Abe, Chandra M. Natarajan, Tomoyuki Horikiri, Sebastian Maier, Carsten Langrock, Jason S. Pelc, Christian Schneider, Sven Höfling
    Abstract:

    Practical quantum communication between remote quantum memories rely on single Photons at telecom wavelengths. Although spin-photon entanglement has been demonstrated in atomic and solid-state qubit systems, the produced single Photons at short wavelengths and with polarization encoding are not suitable for long-distance communication, because they suffer from high propagation loss and depolarization in optical fibres. Establishing entanglement between remote quantum nodes would further require the Photons generated from separate nodes to be indistinguishable. Here, we report the observation of correlations between a quantum-dot spin and a telecom single photon across a 2-km fibre channel based on time-bin encoding and background-free frequency downconversion. The downconverted photon at telecom wavelengths exhibits two-photon interference with another photon from an independent source, achieving a mean wavepacket overlap of greater than 0.89 despite their original wavelength mismatch (900 and 911 nm). The quantum-networking operations that we demonstrate will enable practical communication between solid-state spin qubits across long distances.

  • Deterministic and robust generation of single Photons from a single quantum dot with 99.5% indistinguishability using adiabatic rapid passage
    Nano Letters, 2014
    Co-Authors: Yu Jia Wei, Dian Wu, Yi Nan Hu, Yu Ming He, Ming-cheng Chen, Martin Kamp, Christian Schneider, Sven Höfling, Yihai He, Chao Yang Lu
    Abstract:

    We demonstrate deterministic and robust generation of pulsed resonance fluorescence single Photons from a single InGaAs quantum dot using the method of rapid adiabatic passage. Comparative study is performed with transform-limited, negatively chirped and positively chirped pulses, identifying the last one to be the most robust against fluctuation of driving strength. The generated single Photons are background free, have a vanishing two-photon emission probability of 0.3% and a raw (corrected) two-photon Hong-Ou-Mandel interference visibility of 97.9% (99.5%), reaching a precision that places single Photons at the threshold for fault-tolerant surface-code quantum computing. The single-photon source can be readily scaled up to multi-photon entanglement and used for quantum metrology, boson sampling and linear optical quantum computing.