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Saccharomyces

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Maurizio Ciani - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Use of Non-Saccharomyces Yeasts in Red Winemaking
    Red Wine Technology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Maurizio Ciani, Francesca Comitini
    Abstract:

    Abstract Grape must is a complex matrix where grapes, microbes, and technological process determine the final composition of wine. In red wine vinification process the maceration during fermentation promotes the colonization of non-Saccharomyces yeasts widely present on the grape surface. These yeasts influence both the analytical composition and sensorial profile of final wine. In this regard, the use of selected non-Saccharomyces yeasts in mixed fermentations may positively contribute to enhance some desired characteristics of red wines. Non-Saccharomyces yeasts may be profitably used to enhance the aroma profile, to add complexity, and to reduce the ethanol content of wine. In addition, they can be involved in the stabilization of red wines by means of the release of polysaccharides and particularly of mannoproteins. The involvement of some non-Saccharomyces species during the red wine vinification significantly affects the total acidity of wine through the maloalcoholic fermentation or the production of large amounts of organic acids. Finally, some recent works highlighted the influence of these non-Saccharomyces yeasts on polyphenols composition and color stability of red wines. In this chapter, the role of the most studied non-Saccharomyces species will be discussed, focusing the attention on their contribution with commercial starters of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during wine fermentation.

  • selected non Saccharomyces wine yeasts in controlled multistarter fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    Food Microbiology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Francesca Comitini, Ilaria Mannazzu, Paola Domizio, Mirko Gobbi, Cristina Romani, Livio Lencioni, Maurizio Ciani
    Abstract:

    Non-Saccharomyces yeasts are metabolically active during spontaneous and inoculated must fermentations, and by producing a plethora of by-products, they can contribute to the definition of the wine aroma. Thus, use of Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts as mixed starter cultures for inoculation of wine fermentations is of increasing interest for quality enhancement and improved complexity of wines. We initially characterized 34 non-Saccharomyces yeasts of the genera Candida, Lachancea (Kluyveromyces), Metschnikowia and Torulaspora, and evaluated their enological potential. This confirmed that non-Saccharomyces yeasts from wine-related environments represent a rich sink of unexplored biodiversity for the winemaking industry. From these, we selected four non-Saccharomyces yeasts to combine with starter cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mixed fermentation trials. The kinetics of growth and fermentation, and the analytical profiles of the wines produced indicate that these non-Saccharomyces strains can be used with S. cerevisiae starter cultures to increase polysaccharide, glycerol and volatile compound production, to reduce volatile acidity, and to increase or reduce the total acidity of the final wines, depending on yeast species and inoculum ratio used. The overall effects of the non-Saccharomyces yeasts on fermentation and wine quality were strictly dependent on the Saccharomyces/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratio that mimicked the differences of fermentation conditions (natural or simultaneous inoculated fermentation).

  • Outlining a future for non-Saccharomyces yeasts: Selection of putative spoilage wine strains to be used in association with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for grape juice fermentation
    International Journal of Food Microbiology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Paola Domizio, Ilaria Mannazzu, Francesca Comitini, Mirko Gobbi, Cristina Romani, Livio Lencioni, Maurizio Ciani
    Abstract:

    The use of non-Saccharomyces yeasts that are generally considered as spoilage yeasts, in association with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for grape must fermentation was here evaluated. Analysis of the main oenological characteristics of pure cultures of 55 yeasts belonging to the genera Hanseniaspora, Pichia, Saccharomycodes and ZygoSaccharomyces revealed wide biodiversity within each genus. Moreover, many of these non-Saccharomyces strains had interesting oenological properties in terms of fermentation purity, and ethanol and secondary metabolite production. The use of four non-Saccharomyces yeasts (one per genus) in mixed cultures with a commercial S. cerevisiae strain at different S. cerevisiae/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratios was investigated. This revealed that most of the compounds normally produced at high concentrations by pure cultures of non-Saccharomyces, and which are considered detrimental to wine quality, do not reach threshold taste levels in these mixed fermentations. On the other hand, the analytical profiles of the wines produced by these mixed cultures indicated that depending on the yeast species and the S. cerevisiae/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratio, these non-Saccharomyces yeasts can be used to increase production of polysaccharides and to modulate the final concentrations of acetic acid and volatile compounds, such as ethyl acetate, phenyl-ethyl acetate, 2-phenyl ethanol, and 2-methyl 1-butanol.

  • controlled mixed culture fermentation a new perspective on the use of non Saccharomyces yeasts in winemaking
    Fems Yeast Research, 2010
    Co-Authors: Maurizio Ciani, Ilaria Mannazzu, Francesca Comitini, Paola Domizio
    Abstract:

    Mixed fermentations using controlled inoculation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae starter cultures and non-Saccharomyces yeasts represent a feasible way towards improving the complexity and enhancing the particular and specific characteristics of wines. The profusion of selected starter cultures has allowed the more widespread use of inoculated fermentations, with consequent improvements to the control of the fermentation process, and the use of new biotechnological processes in winemaking. Over the last few years, as a consequence of the re-evaluation of the role of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in winemaking, there have been several studies that have evaluated the use of controlled mixed fermentations using Saccharomyces and different non-Saccharomyces yeast species from the wine environment. The combined use of different species often results in unpredictable compounds and/or different levels of fermentation products being produced, which can affect both the chemical and the aromatic composition of wines. Moreover, possible synergistic interactions between different yeasts might provide a tool for the implementation of new fermentation technologies. Thus, knowledge of the Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces wine yeast interactions during wine fermentation needs to be improved. To reach this goal, further investigations into the genetic and physiological background of such non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts are needed, so as to apply '-omics' approaches to mixed culture fermentations.

  • Activity of different 'killer' yeasts on strains of yeast species undesirable in the food industry.
    Fems Microbiology Letters, 1991
    Co-Authors: Valentino Palpacelli, Maurizio Ciani, Gianfranco Rosini
    Abstract:

    Killer strains of the genera Saccharomyces, Hansenula and Kluyveromyces were tested for killing activity against yeasts that cause trouble in the food inductry (in the genera ZygoSaccharomyces, Kloeckera, Saccharomycodes and SchizoSaccharomyces). Saccharomyces strains killed only ZygoSaccharomyces rouxii strains, while non-Saccharomyces strains showed a wider anti-yeast spectrum. The Kluyveromyces phaffii killer strain was of particular interest because of its killer action against Kloeckera apiculata, Saccharomycodes ludwigii and ZygoSaccharomyces rouxii.

Paola Domizio - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • selected non Saccharomyces wine yeasts in controlled multistarter fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    Food Microbiology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Francesca Comitini, Ilaria Mannazzu, Paola Domizio, Mirko Gobbi, Cristina Romani, Livio Lencioni, Maurizio Ciani
    Abstract:

    Non-Saccharomyces yeasts are metabolically active during spontaneous and inoculated must fermentations, and by producing a plethora of by-products, they can contribute to the definition of the wine aroma. Thus, use of Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts as mixed starter cultures for inoculation of wine fermentations is of increasing interest for quality enhancement and improved complexity of wines. We initially characterized 34 non-Saccharomyces yeasts of the genera Candida, Lachancea (Kluyveromyces), Metschnikowia and Torulaspora, and evaluated their enological potential. This confirmed that non-Saccharomyces yeasts from wine-related environments represent a rich sink of unexplored biodiversity for the winemaking industry. From these, we selected four non-Saccharomyces yeasts to combine with starter cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mixed fermentation trials. The kinetics of growth and fermentation, and the analytical profiles of the wines produced indicate that these non-Saccharomyces strains can be used with S. cerevisiae starter cultures to increase polysaccharide, glycerol and volatile compound production, to reduce volatile acidity, and to increase or reduce the total acidity of the final wines, depending on yeast species and inoculum ratio used. The overall effects of the non-Saccharomyces yeasts on fermentation and wine quality were strictly dependent on the Saccharomyces/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratio that mimicked the differences of fermentation conditions (natural or simultaneous inoculated fermentation).

  • Outlining a future for non-Saccharomyces yeasts: Selection of putative spoilage wine strains to be used in association with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for grape juice fermentation
    International Journal of Food Microbiology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Paola Domizio, Ilaria Mannazzu, Francesca Comitini, Mirko Gobbi, Cristina Romani, Livio Lencioni, Maurizio Ciani
    Abstract:

    The use of non-Saccharomyces yeasts that are generally considered as spoilage yeasts, in association with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for grape must fermentation was here evaluated. Analysis of the main oenological characteristics of pure cultures of 55 yeasts belonging to the genera Hanseniaspora, Pichia, Saccharomycodes and ZygoSaccharomyces revealed wide biodiversity within each genus. Moreover, many of these non-Saccharomyces strains had interesting oenological properties in terms of fermentation purity, and ethanol and secondary metabolite production. The use of four non-Saccharomyces yeasts (one per genus) in mixed cultures with a commercial S. cerevisiae strain at different S. cerevisiae/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratios was investigated. This revealed that most of the compounds normally produced at high concentrations by pure cultures of non-Saccharomyces, and which are considered detrimental to wine quality, do not reach threshold taste levels in these mixed fermentations. On the other hand, the analytical profiles of the wines produced by these mixed cultures indicated that depending on the yeast species and the S. cerevisiae/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratio, these non-Saccharomyces yeasts can be used to increase production of polysaccharides and to modulate the final concentrations of acetic acid and volatile compounds, such as ethyl acetate, phenyl-ethyl acetate, 2-phenyl ethanol, and 2-methyl 1-butanol.

  • controlled mixed culture fermentation a new perspective on the use of non Saccharomyces yeasts in winemaking
    Fems Yeast Research, 2010
    Co-Authors: Maurizio Ciani, Ilaria Mannazzu, Francesca Comitini, Paola Domizio
    Abstract:

    Mixed fermentations using controlled inoculation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae starter cultures and non-Saccharomyces yeasts represent a feasible way towards improving the complexity and enhancing the particular and specific characteristics of wines. The profusion of selected starter cultures has allowed the more widespread use of inoculated fermentations, with consequent improvements to the control of the fermentation process, and the use of new biotechnological processes in winemaking. Over the last few years, as a consequence of the re-evaluation of the role of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in winemaking, there have been several studies that have evaluated the use of controlled mixed fermentations using Saccharomyces and different non-Saccharomyces yeast species from the wine environment. The combined use of different species often results in unpredictable compounds and/or different levels of fermentation products being produced, which can affect both the chemical and the aromatic composition of wines. Moreover, possible synergistic interactions between different yeasts might provide a tool for the implementation of new fermentation technologies. Thus, knowledge of the Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces wine yeast interactions during wine fermentation needs to be improved. To reach this goal, further investigations into the genetic and physiological background of such non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts are needed, so as to apply '-omics' approaches to mixed culture fermentations.

Francesca Comitini - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Use of Non-Saccharomyces Yeasts in Red Winemaking
    Red Wine Technology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Maurizio Ciani, Francesca Comitini
    Abstract:

    Abstract Grape must is a complex matrix where grapes, microbes, and technological process determine the final composition of wine. In red wine vinification process the maceration during fermentation promotes the colonization of non-Saccharomyces yeasts widely present on the grape surface. These yeasts influence both the analytical composition and sensorial profile of final wine. In this regard, the use of selected non-Saccharomyces yeasts in mixed fermentations may positively contribute to enhance some desired characteristics of red wines. Non-Saccharomyces yeasts may be profitably used to enhance the aroma profile, to add complexity, and to reduce the ethanol content of wine. In addition, they can be involved in the stabilization of red wines by means of the release of polysaccharides and particularly of mannoproteins. The involvement of some non-Saccharomyces species during the red wine vinification significantly affects the total acidity of wine through the maloalcoholic fermentation or the production of large amounts of organic acids. Finally, some recent works highlighted the influence of these non-Saccharomyces yeasts on polyphenols composition and color stability of red wines. In this chapter, the role of the most studied non-Saccharomyces species will be discussed, focusing the attention on their contribution with commercial starters of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during wine fermentation.

  • selected non Saccharomyces wine yeasts in controlled multistarter fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    Food Microbiology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Francesca Comitini, Ilaria Mannazzu, Paola Domizio, Mirko Gobbi, Cristina Romani, Livio Lencioni, Maurizio Ciani
    Abstract:

    Non-Saccharomyces yeasts are metabolically active during spontaneous and inoculated must fermentations, and by producing a plethora of by-products, they can contribute to the definition of the wine aroma. Thus, use of Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts as mixed starter cultures for inoculation of wine fermentations is of increasing interest for quality enhancement and improved complexity of wines. We initially characterized 34 non-Saccharomyces yeasts of the genera Candida, Lachancea (Kluyveromyces), Metschnikowia and Torulaspora, and evaluated their enological potential. This confirmed that non-Saccharomyces yeasts from wine-related environments represent a rich sink of unexplored biodiversity for the winemaking industry. From these, we selected four non-Saccharomyces yeasts to combine with starter cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mixed fermentation trials. The kinetics of growth and fermentation, and the analytical profiles of the wines produced indicate that these non-Saccharomyces strains can be used with S. cerevisiae starter cultures to increase polysaccharide, glycerol and volatile compound production, to reduce volatile acidity, and to increase or reduce the total acidity of the final wines, depending on yeast species and inoculum ratio used. The overall effects of the non-Saccharomyces yeasts on fermentation and wine quality were strictly dependent on the Saccharomyces/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratio that mimicked the differences of fermentation conditions (natural or simultaneous inoculated fermentation).

  • Outlining a future for non-Saccharomyces yeasts: Selection of putative spoilage wine strains to be used in association with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for grape juice fermentation
    International Journal of Food Microbiology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Paola Domizio, Ilaria Mannazzu, Francesca Comitini, Mirko Gobbi, Cristina Romani, Livio Lencioni, Maurizio Ciani
    Abstract:

    The use of non-Saccharomyces yeasts that are generally considered as spoilage yeasts, in association with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for grape must fermentation was here evaluated. Analysis of the main oenological characteristics of pure cultures of 55 yeasts belonging to the genera Hanseniaspora, Pichia, Saccharomycodes and ZygoSaccharomyces revealed wide biodiversity within each genus. Moreover, many of these non-Saccharomyces strains had interesting oenological properties in terms of fermentation purity, and ethanol and secondary metabolite production. The use of four non-Saccharomyces yeasts (one per genus) in mixed cultures with a commercial S. cerevisiae strain at different S. cerevisiae/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratios was investigated. This revealed that most of the compounds normally produced at high concentrations by pure cultures of non-Saccharomyces, and which are considered detrimental to wine quality, do not reach threshold taste levels in these mixed fermentations. On the other hand, the analytical profiles of the wines produced by these mixed cultures indicated that depending on the yeast species and the S. cerevisiae/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratio, these non-Saccharomyces yeasts can be used to increase production of polysaccharides and to modulate the final concentrations of acetic acid and volatile compounds, such as ethyl acetate, phenyl-ethyl acetate, 2-phenyl ethanol, and 2-methyl 1-butanol.

  • controlled mixed culture fermentation a new perspective on the use of non Saccharomyces yeasts in winemaking
    Fems Yeast Research, 2010
    Co-Authors: Maurizio Ciani, Ilaria Mannazzu, Francesca Comitini, Paola Domizio
    Abstract:

    Mixed fermentations using controlled inoculation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae starter cultures and non-Saccharomyces yeasts represent a feasible way towards improving the complexity and enhancing the particular and specific characteristics of wines. The profusion of selected starter cultures has allowed the more widespread use of inoculated fermentations, with consequent improvements to the control of the fermentation process, and the use of new biotechnological processes in winemaking. Over the last few years, as a consequence of the re-evaluation of the role of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in winemaking, there have been several studies that have evaluated the use of controlled mixed fermentations using Saccharomyces and different non-Saccharomyces yeast species from the wine environment. The combined use of different species often results in unpredictable compounds and/or different levels of fermentation products being produced, which can affect both the chemical and the aromatic composition of wines. Moreover, possible synergistic interactions between different yeasts might provide a tool for the implementation of new fermentation technologies. Thus, knowledge of the Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces wine yeast interactions during wine fermentation needs to be improved. To reach this goal, further investigations into the genetic and physiological background of such non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts are needed, so as to apply '-omics' approaches to mixed culture fermentations.

Amparo Querol - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Nitrogen sources preferences of non-Saccharomyces yeasts to sustain growth and fermentation under winemaking conditions
    Food Microbiology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Pauline Seguinot, Amparo Querol, Isabelle Sanchez, Anne Ortiz-julien, José Maria Heras, Carole Camarasa, José Manuel Guillamón
    Abstract:

    Wine-related non-Saccharomyces yeasts are becoming more widely used in oenological practice for their ability to confer wine a more complex satisfying aroma, but their metabolism remains unknown. Our study explored the nitrogen utilisation profile of three popular non-Saccharomyces species, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Metschnikowia pulcherrima and Metschnikowia fructicola. The nitrogen source preferences to support growth and fermentation as well as the uptake order of different nitrogen sources during wine fermentation were investigated. While T.delbrueckii and S. cerevisiae strains shared the same nitrogen source preferences, Metschnikowia sp. Displayed alower capacity to efficiently use the preferred nitrogen compounds, but were able to assimilate a wider range of amino acids. During alcoholic fermentation, the non-Saccharomyces strains consumed different nitrogen sources in a similar order as S. cerevisiae, but not as quickly. Furthermore, when all the nitrogen sources were supplied in the same amount, their assimilation order was similarly affected for both S. cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces strains. Under this condition, the rate of nitrogen source consumption of non-Saccharomyces strains and S.cerevisiae was comparable. Overall, this study expands our understanding about the preferences and consumption rates of individual nitrogen sources by the investigated non-Saccharomyces yeasts in a wine environment.This knowledge provides useful information for a more efficient exploitation of non-Saccharomyces strains that improves the management of the wine fermentation.

  • Saccharomyces kudriavzevii and Saccharomyces uvarum differ from Saccharomyces cerevisiae during the production of aroma-active higher alcohols and acetate esters using their amino acidic precursors.
    International Journal of Food Microbiology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Jiri Stribny, Amparo Gamero, Roberto Pérez-torrado, Amparo Querol
    Abstract:

    Higher alcohols and acetate esters are important flavour and aroma components in the food industry. In alcoholic beverages these compounds are produced by yeast during fermentation. Although Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the most extensively used species, other species of the Saccharomyces genus have become common in fermentation processes. This study analyses and compares the production of higher alcohols and acetate esters from their amino acidic precursors in three Saccharomyces species: Saccharomyces kudriavzevii, Saccharomyces uvarum and S. cerevisiae. The global volatile compound analysis revealed that S. kudriavzevii produced large amounts of higher alcohols, whereas S. uvarum excelled in the production of acetate esters. Particularly from phenylalanine, S. uvarum produced the largest amounts of 2-phenylethyl acetate, while S. kudriavzevii obtained the greatest 2-phenylethanol formation from this precursor. The present data indicate differences in the amino acid metabolism and subsequent production of flavour-active higher alcohols and acetate esters among the closely related Saccharomyces species. This knowledge will prove useful for developing new enhanced processes in fragrance, flavour, and food industries.

  • Monoterpene alcohols release and bioconversion by Saccharomyces species and hybrids.
    International Journal of Food Microbiology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Amparo Gamero, P. Manzanares, Amparo Querol, Carmela Belloch
    Abstract:

    Abstract Terpene profile of Muscat wines fermented by Saccharomyces species and hybrid yeasts was investigated. The amount of geraniol decreased in most wines with respect to the initial must except for Saccharomyces bayanus wines. On the other hand, alpha-terpineol amount was higher in wines fermented by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and hybrid yeasts. The amount of linalool was similar in all wines and comparable to the amount in the initial must. Lower levels of beta- d -glucosidase activity were found in the hybrid yeasts with respect to S. cerevisiae. Moreover, no relationship between beta- d -glucosidase activity and terpenes profile in Muscat wines fermented with Saccharomyces species and hybrids was found. Growth of yeasts on minimum medium supplemented with geraniol showed bioconversion of geraniol into linalool and alpha-terpineol. Percentages of geraniol uptake and bioconversion were different between Saccharomyces species and hybrids. Strains within S. bayanus, Saccharomyces kudriavzevii and hybrids showed higher geraniol uptake than S. cerevisiae, whereas the percentage of produced linalool and alpha-terpineol was higher in S. cerevisiae and hybrid yeasts than in S. bayanus and S. kudriavzevii. The relationship between geraniol uptake and adaptation of Saccharomyces species to grow at low temperature is discussed.

  • Natural hybrids from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces bayanus and Saccharomyces kudriavzevii in wine fermentations
    FEMS Yeast Research, 2006
    Co-Authors: Sara S. González, Eladio Barrio, Jürg Gafner, Amparo Querol
    Abstract:

    Several wine isolates of Saccharomyces were analysed for six molecular markers, five nuclear and one mitochondrial, and new natural interspecific hybrids were identified. The molecular characterization of these Saccharomyces hybrids was performed based on the restriction analysis of five nuclear genes ( CAT8 , CYR1 , GSY1 , MET6 and OPY1 , located in different chromosomes), the ribosomal region encompassing the 5.8S rRNA gene and the two internal transcribed spacers, and sequence analysis of the mitochondrial gene COX2 . This method allowed us to identify and characterize new hybrids between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces kudriavzevii , between S. cerevisiae and Saccharomyces bayanus , as well as a triple hybrid S. bayanus × S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii . This is the first time that S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii hybrids have been described which have been involved in wine fermentation.

José Manuel Guillamón - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Nitrogen sources preferences of non-Saccharomyces yeasts to sustain growth and fermentation under winemaking conditions
    Food Microbiology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Pauline Seguinot, Amparo Querol, Isabelle Sanchez, Anne Ortiz-julien, José Maria Heras, Carole Camarasa, José Manuel Guillamón
    Abstract:

    Wine-related non-Saccharomyces yeasts are becoming more widely used in oenological practice for their ability to confer wine a more complex satisfying aroma, but their metabolism remains unknown. Our study explored the nitrogen utilisation profile of three popular non-Saccharomyces species, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Metschnikowia pulcherrima and Metschnikowia fructicola. The nitrogen source preferences to support growth and fermentation as well as the uptake order of different nitrogen sources during wine fermentation were investigated. While T.delbrueckii and S. cerevisiae strains shared the same nitrogen source preferences, Metschnikowia sp. Displayed alower capacity to efficiently use the preferred nitrogen compounds, but were able to assimilate a wider range of amino acids. During alcoholic fermentation, the non-Saccharomyces strains consumed different nitrogen sources in a similar order as S. cerevisiae, but not as quickly. Furthermore, when all the nitrogen sources were supplied in the same amount, their assimilation order was similarly affected for both S. cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces strains. Under this condition, the rate of nitrogen source consumption of non-Saccharomyces strains and S.cerevisiae was comparable. Overall, this study expands our understanding about the preferences and consumption rates of individual nitrogen sources by the investigated non-Saccharomyces yeasts in a wine environment.This knowledge provides useful information for a more efficient exploitation of non-Saccharomyces strains that improves the management of the wine fermentation.

  • PCR differentiation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from Saccharomyces bayanus/Saccharomyces pastorianus using specific primers
    FEMS Microbiology Letters, 2000
    Co-Authors: Sabaté Josepa, José Manuel Guillamón, Jose M. Cano
    Abstract:

    The aim of the present study was to design species-specific primers capable of distinguishing between Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces bayanus/Saccharomyces pastorianus. The 5′-specific primers were designed from the ITS-1 region (between positions 150 and 182 from the 3′-SSU end) and the 3′-specific primers were located in the LSU gene (positions 560–590 from the 5′-end of this gene). These primers were tested with different collections and wild strains of these species and the results showed that the primers were capable of distinguishing between S. cerevisiae strains and S. bayanus/S. pastorianus. Not enough sequence differences were found between S. bayanus and S. pastorianus to design specific primers for these species using this region. This method offers an effective tool for a quick differentiation of the Saccharomyces strains of the most common species involved in industrial processes.