Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

14,000,000 Leading Edge Experts on the ideXlab platform

14,000,000

Leading Edge Experts

on the ideXlab platform

Sound

The Experts below are selected from a list of 1793949 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Sound - Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Patrick Susini - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Uncovering the Meaning of Four Semantic Attributes of Sound : Bright, Rough, Round and Warm
    2020
    Co-Authors: Victor Rosi, Nicolas Misdariis, Olivier Houix, Patrick Susini
    Abstract:

    Bright (brillant), round (rond), warm (chaud) and rough (rugueux) are four terms vastly used in the French language for Sound description in Sound creation processes such as music performance, orchestration, Sound engineering or Sound design, yet they lack formal, standardised definitions. Therefore, the intent of the present study is to obtain definitions and matching Sound samples of these four terms as they are interpreted by different Sound professionals. This work was organized around individual interviews with 32 Sound professionals (musicians, composers, Sound designers, acousticians.. .), during which they were asked to give definitions of the four terms and to discuss their opposite concepts. The analysis of the interview verba-tims through qualitative analysis and standard NLP (Natu-ral Language Processing) methods allows us to unravel the various Sound description strategies. Based on literature review on timbre semantics we reveal relevant categories for the clustering of the descriptions across the four terms. These categories mainly group acoustic, source-related and metaphorical descriptions produced by the Sound professionals. The experts were also asked to choose Sound samples from a musical instrument database to complete the definition of each word. By analyzing the descriptions and comparing them to the selected Sound samples, we formulate definitions of the four terms along with a few hypotheses on the acoustic correlates involved, thus assessing the potential plurality of perception among the experts.

  • Uncovering the meaning of four semantic attributes of Sound : Bright, Warm, Round and Rough Interviews with Sound experts
    2020
    Co-Authors: Victor Rosi, Nicolas Misdariis, Olivier Houix, Patrick Susini
    Abstract:

    The present study aims to understand the use and the definition of four terms selected from the Sound lexicon developed by Carron et al. [4]. Bright (brillant), round (rond), warm (chaud) and rough (rugueux) are four terms vastly used in the French language for Sound description in Sound creation processes such as music performance, orchestration, Sound engineering or Sound design. Yet, they lack formal, standardized definitions. The goal is to get definitions, or semantic portraits, for each word with corresponding Sound samples from a musical instrument dataset. • Participants : 32 French-fluent Sound experts (musicians, composers, Sound engineers, Sound designers, acousticians …) • Sound dataset : Studio online Library & Vienna Symphonic Library (~600 musical instruments Sound samples) • Duration :~2h10 • Structure : Divided in four parts (for each term) • Questionnaire : Q1 : Frequency and context of use of the studied term Q2 : Definition of the studied term Q3 : Sound samples for the studied term Q4 : Sound samples for the opposite of the studied term Q5 : Definition of the opposite of the studied term Q6 : Investigation of the affect aspect of the studied term Semantic Analysis Methods Acoustic Sound specific semantic nasal (nasal), resonant (résonnant), noisy (bruité) Dynamic forte, piano, crescendo Spectral high-pitch (aigu), harmonics (harmoniques), medium (medium) Temporal attack (attaque), release (décroissance), steady (stable) Source related Excitation mode rub (frotter), vibrato, breathing (souffler) Source trumpet (trompette), voice (voix), orchestra (orchestre) Metaphoric-extracted from literature [1] [3] [4] [5] Crossmodal correspondance (CMC) warm (chaud), harsh (dur), clear (clair) Matter (shape, density, material) round (rond), full (plein), organic (organique) Effect enveloping (enveloppant), scratching (qui gratte) Affect pleasant (agréable), aggressive (agressif), straightforward (franc) Definitions & Sound samples Context • A bright Sound has most of the spectral energy in the high frequencies. It is often a high-pitched Sound that can be composed with a sharp attack. • A warm Sound tends to be a low-pitched or mid-low-pitched Sound. It gives a feeling of spectral richness in the mid-low frequencies. It has a rather soft attack and it is a fairly pleasant Sound that gives a sensation of envelopment. • A round Sound has a soft attack and is temporally stable. It tends to also have a soft release or a long resonance. A round Sound is spectrally perceived as full with a spectral balance located in the mid-low frequencies. • A rough Sound is temporally unstable ; it presents fast temporal variations that can bring some sort of noise. It gives a rubbing/scratching sensation. Glockenspiel hard stick Trumpet brassy Bass clarinet ordinario Cello ordinario Doublebass pizzicato Marimba soft stick Tuba ordinario Winds flatterzunge Bassoon multiphonics Strings sul ponticello • 10 categories of Sound description with verbal examples translated in English along with the original verbatims in French. • Categories were validated with the top 50 lemmas by 4 experts-Fleiss' kappa : = 0.69 (p< 0.001) Online survey (in progress) Goal : Reduce/Hierarchize the quantity of relevant information in order to build more robust definitions Corpus : Phrases extracted from Q2 and Q5 for each term, based on the most occuring lemmas Populations : French-fluent Sound experts Questions (example) :-According to you, the meaning of the concept "high-pitched Sound" is : accurate/ vague / incomprehensible-In your opinion, is a bright Sound a high-pitched Sound ? Strongly agree … Strongly disagree / Non relevant • Tokenization • Lemmatization [2] Lemma/Interviewee frequency for each term Perspectives References Ex : Bright (Brillant)

  • Timbre, Sound Quality, and Sound Design
    Timbre: Acoustics Perception and Cognition, 2019
    Co-Authors: Guillaume Lemaitre, Patrick Susini
    Abstract:

    Sound quality evaluation applies the results of timbre research to the assessment of the Sound quality of manufactured products (domestic appliances, transportation, etc.). This chapter first provides an overview of one methodology. A number of acoustic descriptors reflecting perceived timbre dimensions are established and used to predict users’ preference judgements. Whereas such a methodology has proven very effective, it also has some limitations. In fact, most studies only consider the pleasantness of the Sounds and often overlook other potential roles of Sounds in products and interfaces. In the second part, the chapter introduces Sound design. Whereas Sound quality evaluation merely proposes a diagnostic of the timbre of existing products, Sound design aims to create or modify the timbre of product Sounds to meet specific intentions. These intentions consider the pleasantness, but also several other aspects of product Sounds: functionality, identity, and ecology. All these aspects are interdependent and often closely related to the temporal and timbral characteristics of the Sound. The chapter continues with a discussion of the roles and practices of Sound designers and introduces a set of tools that foster communication about timbre between the different participants of a Sound design process. In particular, the focus is on the necessity for these participants to share a common timbre vocabulary, and the potential impact of education about Sounds is considered. Finally, an important functional aspect of product Sound is discussed: how to design the timbre of Sounds to support user interactions with the product.

  • Speaking about Sounds: a tool for communication on Sound features
    J. of Design Research, 2017
    Co-Authors: Maxime Carron, Thomas Rotureau, Françoise Dubois, Nicolas Misdariis, Patrick Susini
    Abstract:

    With the increasing use of digital technologies and smart objects, Sound is playing an ever more important role in our everyday life interactions with a given object, human computer interface or space. However, few methodologies exist to work on Sound-related issues during the early stages of a design process; manufacturers and Sound designers lack a common terminology to describe and sketch sonic ideas. Informed by a review of the academic literature on verbal descriptions of Sounds and a series of interviews we conducted with Sound practitioners, we propose in the present article a potentially normative lexicon of 35 terms to describe the main Sound characteristics. We also present a computer interface presenting the 35 terms illustrated with concrete and abstract Sounds. This interface may be used as a tool for communication on Sound features in a Sound design process but also during training classes on Sound education.

  • Designing Sound Identity: Providing new communication tools for building brands "corporate Sounds"
    2014
    Co-Authors: Maxime Carron, Françoise Dubois, Nicolas Misdariis, Corinne Talotte, Patrick Susini
    Abstract:

    In this paper we focus through a series of interviews on the relation between Sound and brand identity in the context of musical and Sound design for the industry. The interviews showed that the Sound design process involves stakeholders who have different domains of expertise, which leads to difficulties in the interaction between them. As a solution, we propose a methodological framework for designing Sound identity supported by two communication tools: a deck of cards allowing the different stakeholders to share a common vocabulary concerning both brand and Sound concepts, and a Sound charter which is a way to communicate guidelines for Sound design through the use of Sound identity semantic descriptors, illustrated by Sound examples.

Robert Hickling - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Sound-Power Flow A practitioner's handbook for Sound intensity - Sound sources and methods of exciting Sound
    Sound-Power Flow A practitioner's handbook for sound intensity, 2016
    Co-Authors: Robert Hickling
    Abstract:

    Sound-Power Flow: A practitioner's handbook for Sound intensity is a guide for practitioners and research scientists in different areas of acoustical science. There are three fundamental quantities in acoustics: Sound pressure, Sound particle velocity, and Sound intensity. This book is about Sound intensity and demonstrates the advantages and uses of acoustical sensing compared with other forms of sensing. It describes applications such as: measuring total Sound power; directional hearing of humans and mammals; echolocation; measuring Sound-power flow in ducts; and uses of non-contact, focused, high-frequency, pulse-echo ultrasonic probes. This book presents computational approaches using standard mathematics, and relates these to the measurement of Sound-power flow in air and water. It also uses linear units rather than logarithmic units – this making computation in acoustics simpler and more accessible to advanced mathematics and computing. The book is based on work by the author and his associates at General Motors, the University of Mississippi, and Sonometrics.

  • Sound-Power Flow A practitioner's handbook for Sound intensity - Cosmic Sound waves
    Sound-Power Flow A practitioner's handbook for sound intensity, 2016
    Co-Authors: Robert Hickling
    Abstract:

    Sound-Power Flow: A practitioner's handbook for Sound intensity is a guide for practitioners and research scientists in different areas of acoustical science. There are three fundamental quantities in acoustics: Sound pressure, Sound particle velocity, and Sound intensity. This book is about Sound intensity and demonstrates the advantages and uses of acoustical sensing compared with other forms of sensing. It describes applications such as: measuring total Sound power; directional hearing of humans and mammals; echolocation; measuring Sound-power flow in ducts; and uses of non-contact, focused, high-frequency, pulse-echo ultrasonic probes. This book presents computational approaches using standard mathematics, and relates these to the measurement of Sound-power flow in air and water. It also uses linear units rather than logarithmic units – this making computation in acoustics simpler and more accessible to advanced mathematics and computing. The book is based on work by the author and his associates at General Motors, the University of Mississippi, and Sonometrics.

Takeo Igarashi - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • ICME - Visualizing video Sounds with Sound word animation
    2015 IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo (ICME), 2015
    Co-Authors: Fangzhou Wang, Hidehisa Nagano, Kunio Kashino, Takeo Igarashi
    Abstract:

    Text captions are important means to provide Sound information in videos when the Sound is not accessible. However, conventional text captions are far less expressive for non-verbal Sounds since they are designed to visualize speech Sound. To address this problem, we propose a method for automatically transforming non-verbal video Sounds to animated Sound words, and positioning them near the Sound source objects in the video for visualization. This provides natural visual representation of non-verbal Sounds with rich information about the Sound category and dynamics. We conducted a user study with over 300 participants using an online crowdsourcing service. The results showed that animated Sound words could not only effectively and naturally visualize the dynamics of Sound while clarify the position of the Sound source, but also contribute to making video watching more enjoyable and increasing the visual impact of the video.

Makis Solomos - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • From Sound to Sound Space, Sound Environment, Soundscape, Sound Milieu or Ambiance
    Paragraph, 2018
    Co-Authors: Makis Solomos
    Abstract:

    This article proposes approaching the phenomenon of Sound as a fabric of relationships. Critiquing the notion of a Sound object as it has become defined thanks to the fixity enabled by Sound record...

  • From Sound to Sound Space, Sound Environment, Soundscape, Sound Milieu or Ambiance
    Paragraph, 2018
    Co-Authors: Makis Solomos
    Abstract:

    This article proposes approaching the phenomenon of Sound as a fabric of relationships. Critiquing the notion of a Sound object as it has become defined thanks to the fixity enabled by Sound recording, it focusses on the characteristics of Sound that converge towards a relational approach and suggests that there is an inextricable link between the vibrating object, the milieu in which the vibration spreads and the subject who listens. It is probably for this reason that current research — whether in music, Sound art or other disciplines that centre on Sound, from Sound studies to environmental ecology — implicitly seeks to move beyond the concept of Sound alone in favour of compounds that combine Sound with other elements. While the notions of Sound ‘spaces’ and Sound ‘environments’ appear as the default options here, three other compounds in particular highlight, in their own way, the relational approach: ‘Soundscapes’, ‘Sound milieus’ and Sound ‘ambiances’ and ‘atmospheres’.

Darlene R. Ketten - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Hearing abilities and Sound reception of broadband Sounds in an adult Risso’s dolphin (Grampus griseus)
    Journal of Comparative Physiology A, 2015
    Co-Authors: T. Aran Mooney, Wei-cheng Yang, Hsin-yi Yu, Darlene R. Ketten
    Abstract:

    While odontocetes do not have an external pinna that guides Sound to the middle ear, they are considered to receive Sound through specialized regions of the head and lower jaw. Yet odontocetes differ in the shape of the lower jaw suggesting that hearing pathways may vary between species, potentially influencing hearing directionality and noise impacts. This work measured the audiogram and received sensitivity of a Risso’s dolphin ( Grampus griseus ) in an effort to comparatively examine how this species receives Sound. Jaw hearing thresholds were lowest (most sensitive) at two locations along the anterior, midline region of the lower jaw (the lower jaw tip and anterior part of the throat). Responses were similarly low along a more posterior region of the lower mandible, considered the area of best hearing in bottlenose dolphins. Left- and right-side differences were also noted suggesting possible left–right asymmetries in Sound reception or differences in ear sensitivities. The results indicate best hearing pathways may vary between the Risso’s dolphin and other odontocetes measured. This animal received Sound well, supporting a proposed throat pathway. For Risso’s dolphins in particular, good ventral hearing would support their acoustic ecology by facilitating echo-detection from their proposed downward oriented echolocation beam.

  • hearing abilities and Sound reception of broadband Sounds in an adult risso s dolphin grampus griseus
    Journal of Comparative Physiology A-neuroethology Sensory Neural and Behavioral Physiology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Aran T Mooney, Wei-cheng Yang, Darlene R. Ketten, Ifan Jen
    Abstract:

    While odontocetes do not have an external pinna that guides Sound to the middle ear, they are consid- ered to receive Sound through specialized regions of the head and lower jaw. Yet odontocetes differ in the shape of the lower jaw suggesting that hearing pathways may vary between species, potentially influencing hearing direction - ality and noise impacts. This work measured the audiogram and received sensitivity of a Risso's dolphin (Grampus gri- seus) in an effort to comparatively examine how this spe- cies receives Sound. Jaw hearing thresholds were lowest (most sensitive) at two locations along the anterior, midline region of the lower jaw (the lower jaw tip and anterior part of the throat). Responses were similarly low along a more posterior region of the lower mandible, considered the area of best hearing in bottlenose dolphins. Left- and right-side differences were also noted suggesting possible left-right asymmetries in Sound reception or differences in ear sen- sitivities. The results indicate best hearing pathways may vary between the Risso's dolphin and other odontocetes measured. This animal received Sound well, supporting a proposed throat pathway. For Risso's dolphins in particular, good ventral hearing would support their acoustic ecology