18alpha Glycyrrhetinic Acid

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Akira Takeshita - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • hydrogen peroxide is an endothelium derived hyperpolarizing factor in human mesenteric arteries
    2002
    Co-Authors: Tetsuya Matoba, Hiroaki Shimokawa, Hiroshi Kubota, Keiko Morikawa, Takako Fujiki, Ikuko Kunihiro, Yasushi Mukai, Yoji Hirakawa, Akira Takeshita
    Abstract:

    The endothelium plays an important role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by synthesizing and releasing several vasodilating factors, including prostacyclin, nitric oxide, and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). We have recently identified that endothelium-derived hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is an EDHF in mice. The present study was designed to examine whether this is also the case in humans. Bradykinin elicited endothelium-dependent relaxations and hyperpolarizations in the presence of indomethacin and N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine, which thus were attributed to EDHF, in human mesenteric arteries. The EDHF-mediated relaxations were significantly inhibited by catalase, an enzyme that specifically decomposes H(2)O(2), whereas catalase did not affect endothelium-independent hyperpolarizations to levcromakalim. Exogenous H(2)O(2) elicited relaxations and hyperpolarizations in endothelium-stripped arteries. Gap junction inhibitor 18alpha-Glycyrrhetinic Acid partially inhibited, whereas inhibitors of cytochrome P450 did not affect the EDHF-mediated relaxations. These results indicate that H(2)O(2) is also a primary EDHF in human mesenteric arteries with some contribution of gap junctions.

Amrita Ahluwalia - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • an endothelium derived hyperpolarizing factor like factor moderates myogenic constriction of mesenteric resistance arteries in the absence of endothelial nitric oxide synthase derived nitric oxide
    2001
    Co-Authors: Ramona S Scotland, Sharmila Chauhan, Patrick Vallance, Amrita Ahluwalia
    Abstract:

    Myogenic tone is an important determinant of vascular tone and blood flow in small resistance arteries of certain vascular beds. The role of the endothelium in myogenic responses is unclear. We hypothesized that endothelium-derived NO release modulates myogenic constriction in small resistance arteries and that mesenteric small arteries from mice with targeted disruption of the gene for endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) (knockout mice) demonstrate greater myogenic tone than do wild-type mice. Third-order mesenteric arteries (approximately 200 micrometer) were isolated and mounted in a pressure myograph. Internal diameter was recorded over a pressure range of 10 to 80 mm Hg. Removal of the endothelium significantly (P<0.05) enhanced the magnitude of myogenic constriction in wild-type mice. Similarly, pretreatment of arteries with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 300 micromol/L) produced a comparable significant (P<0.05) increase in myogenic tone, whereas indomethacin (5 micromol/L) had no effect. eNOS knockout arteries also exhibited myogenic constriction. Neither L-NAME nor indomethacin had any effect on myogenic tone in the arteries of eNOS knockout mice. However, blockade of potential endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-like mechanisms via inhibition of K(+) flux using either apamin (100 nmol/L) with charybdotoxin (100 nmol/L), Ba(2+) (30 micromol/L) with ouabain (1 mmol/L), or 18alpha-Glycyrrhetinic Acid (100 micromol/L) significantly (P<0.01) enhanced myogenic constriction. This study demonstrates that basal endothelium-derived NO modulates myogenic tone in mesenteric small arteries of wild-type mice. However, eNOS knockout arteries display normal myogenic responsiveness despite the absence of basal NO activity. The data suggest that this compensatory effect is due to the activity of an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor to normalize vascular tone.

Tetsuya Matoba - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • hydrogen peroxide is an endothelium derived hyperpolarizing factor in human mesenteric arteries
    2002
    Co-Authors: Tetsuya Matoba, Hiroaki Shimokawa, Hiroshi Kubota, Keiko Morikawa, Takako Fujiki, Ikuko Kunihiro, Yasushi Mukai, Yoji Hirakawa, Akira Takeshita
    Abstract:

    The endothelium plays an important role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by synthesizing and releasing several vasodilating factors, including prostacyclin, nitric oxide, and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). We have recently identified that endothelium-derived hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is an EDHF in mice. The present study was designed to examine whether this is also the case in humans. Bradykinin elicited endothelium-dependent relaxations and hyperpolarizations in the presence of indomethacin and N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine, which thus were attributed to EDHF, in human mesenteric arteries. The EDHF-mediated relaxations were significantly inhibited by catalase, an enzyme that specifically decomposes H(2)O(2), whereas catalase did not affect endothelium-independent hyperpolarizations to levcromakalim. Exogenous H(2)O(2) elicited relaxations and hyperpolarizations in endothelium-stripped arteries. Gap junction inhibitor 18alpha-Glycyrrhetinic Acid partially inhibited, whereas inhibitors of cytochrome P450 did not affect the EDHF-mediated relaxations. These results indicate that H(2)O(2) is also a primary EDHF in human mesenteric arteries with some contribution of gap junctions.

Ramona S Scotland - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • an endothelium derived hyperpolarizing factor like factor moderates myogenic constriction of mesenteric resistance arteries in the absence of endothelial nitric oxide synthase derived nitric oxide
    2001
    Co-Authors: Ramona S Scotland, Sharmila Chauhan, Patrick Vallance, Amrita Ahluwalia
    Abstract:

    Myogenic tone is an important determinant of vascular tone and blood flow in small resistance arteries of certain vascular beds. The role of the endothelium in myogenic responses is unclear. We hypothesized that endothelium-derived NO release modulates myogenic constriction in small resistance arteries and that mesenteric small arteries from mice with targeted disruption of the gene for endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) (knockout mice) demonstrate greater myogenic tone than do wild-type mice. Third-order mesenteric arteries (approximately 200 micrometer) were isolated and mounted in a pressure myograph. Internal diameter was recorded over a pressure range of 10 to 80 mm Hg. Removal of the endothelium significantly (P<0.05) enhanced the magnitude of myogenic constriction in wild-type mice. Similarly, pretreatment of arteries with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 300 micromol/L) produced a comparable significant (P<0.05) increase in myogenic tone, whereas indomethacin (5 micromol/L) had no effect. eNOS knockout arteries also exhibited myogenic constriction. Neither L-NAME nor indomethacin had any effect on myogenic tone in the arteries of eNOS knockout mice. However, blockade of potential endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-like mechanisms via inhibition of K(+) flux using either apamin (100 nmol/L) with charybdotoxin (100 nmol/L), Ba(2+) (30 micromol/L) with ouabain (1 mmol/L), or 18alpha-Glycyrrhetinic Acid (100 micromol/L) significantly (P<0.01) enhanced myogenic constriction. This study demonstrates that basal endothelium-derived NO modulates myogenic tone in mesenteric small arteries of wild-type mice. However, eNOS knockout arteries display normal myogenic responsiveness despite the absence of basal NO activity. The data suggest that this compensatory effect is due to the activity of an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor to normalize vascular tone.

Hiroaki Shimokawa - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • hydrogen peroxide is an endothelium derived hyperpolarizing factor in human mesenteric arteries
    2002
    Co-Authors: Tetsuya Matoba, Hiroaki Shimokawa, Hiroshi Kubota, Keiko Morikawa, Takako Fujiki, Ikuko Kunihiro, Yasushi Mukai, Yoji Hirakawa, Akira Takeshita
    Abstract:

    The endothelium plays an important role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by synthesizing and releasing several vasodilating factors, including prostacyclin, nitric oxide, and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). We have recently identified that endothelium-derived hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is an EDHF in mice. The present study was designed to examine whether this is also the case in humans. Bradykinin elicited endothelium-dependent relaxations and hyperpolarizations in the presence of indomethacin and N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine, which thus were attributed to EDHF, in human mesenteric arteries. The EDHF-mediated relaxations were significantly inhibited by catalase, an enzyme that specifically decomposes H(2)O(2), whereas catalase did not affect endothelium-independent hyperpolarizations to levcromakalim. Exogenous H(2)O(2) elicited relaxations and hyperpolarizations in endothelium-stripped arteries. Gap junction inhibitor 18alpha-Glycyrrhetinic Acid partially inhibited, whereas inhibitors of cytochrome P450 did not affect the EDHF-mediated relaxations. These results indicate that H(2)O(2) is also a primary EDHF in human mesenteric arteries with some contribution of gap junctions.