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Michael J. Danson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Comparative Genomic Analysis Reveals 2Oxoacid Dehydrogenase Complex Lipoylation Correlation with
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Aerobiosis In Archaea, Michael J. Danson, Mareike G. Posner, Abhishek Upadhyay, Kirill Borziak, Stefan Bagby, Steve Dorus

    Abstract:

    Metagenomic analyses have advanced our understanding of ecological microbial diversity, but to what extent can metagenomic data be used to predict the metabolic capacity of difficult-to-study organisms and their abiotic environmental interactions? We tackle this question, using a comparative genomic approach, by considering the molecular basis of aerobiosis within archaea. Lipoylation, the covalent attachment of lipoic acid to 2Oxoacid dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes (OADHCs), is essential for metabolism in aerobic bacteria and eukarya. Lipoylation is catalysed either by lipoate protein ligase (LplA), which in archaea is typically encoded by two genes (LplA-N and LplA-C), or by a lipoyl(octanoyl) transferase (LipB or LipM) plus a lipoic acid synthetase (LipA). Does the genomic presence of lipoylation and OADHC genes across archaea from diverse habitats correlate with aerobiosis? First, analyses of 11,826 biotin protein ligase (BPL)-LplA-LipB transferase family members and 147 archaeal genomes identified 85 species with lipoylation capabilities and provided support for multiple ancestral acquisitions of lipoylation pathways during archaeal evolution. Second, with the exception of the Sulfolobales order, the majority of species possessing lipoylation systems exclusively retain LplA, or either LipB or LipM, consistent with archaeal genome streamlining. Third, obligate anaerobic archaea display widespread loss of lipoylation and OADHC genes. Conversely, a high level of correspondence is observed between aerobiosis and the presence of LplA/LipB/ LipM, LipA and OADHC E2, consistent with the role of lipoylation in aerobic metabolism. This correspondence betwee

  • Why are the 2Oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes so large? Generation of an active trimeric complex
    Biochemical Journal, 2014
    Co-Authors: Nia L. Marrott, David W. Hough, Jacqueline J. T. Marshall, Dmitri I. Svergun, Susan J. Crennell, Jean M. H. Van Den Elsen, Michael J. Danson

    Abstract:

    The four-component polypeptides of the 2Oxoacid dehydrogenase complex from the thermophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum assemble to give an active multienzyme complex possessing activity with the branched-chain 2Oxoacids derived from leucine, isoleucine and valine, and with pyruvate. The dihydrolipoyl acyl-transferase (E2) core of the complex is composed of identical trimer-forming units that assemble into a novel 42-mer structure comprising octahedral and icosahedral geometric aspects. From our previously determined structure of this catalytic core, the inter-trimer interactions involve a tyrosine residue near the C-terminus secured in a hydrophobic pocket of an adjacent trimer like a ball-and-socket joint. In the present study, we have deleted the five C-terminal amino acids of the E2 polypeptide (IIYEI) and shown by equilibrium centrifugation that it now only assembles into a trimeric enzyme. This was confirmed by SAXS analysis, although this technique showed the presence of approximately 20% hexamers. The crystal structure of the trimeric truncated E2 core has been determined and shown to be virtually identical with the ones observed in the 42-mer, demonstrating that removal of the C-terminal anchor does not significantly affect the individual monomer or trimer structures. The truncated E2 is still able to bind both 2Oxoacid decarboxylase (E1) and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3) components to give an active complex with catalytic activity similar to the native multienzyme complex. This is the first report of an active mini-complex for this enzyme, and raises the question of why all 2Oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes assemble into such large structures.

  • Comparative genomic analysis reveals 2Oxoacid dehydrogenase complex lipoylation correlation with aerobiosis in archaea.
    PLoS ONE, 2014
    Co-Authors: Kirill Borziak, Michael J. Danson, Mareike G. Posner, Abhishek Upadhyay, Stefan Bagby, Steve Dorus

    Abstract:

    Metagenomic analyses have advanced our understanding of ecological microbial diversity, but to what extent can metagenomic data be used to predict the metabolic capacity of difficult-to-study organisms and their abiotic environmental interactions? We tackle this question, using a comparative genomic approach, by considering the molecular basis of aerobiosis within archaea. Lipoylation, the covalent attachment of lipoic acid to 2Oxoacid dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes (OADHCs), is essential for metabolism in aerobic bacteria and eukarya. Lipoylation is catalysed either by lipoate protein ligase (LplA), which in archaea is typically encoded by two genes (LplA-N and LplA-C), or by a lipoyl(octanoyl) transferase (LipB or LipM) plus a lipoic acid synthetase (LipA). Does the genomic presence of lipoylation and OADHC genes across archaea from diverse habitats correlate with aerobiosis? First, analyses of 11,826 biotin protein ligase (BPL)-LplA-LipB transferase family members and 147 archaeal genomes identified 85 species with lipoylation capabilities and provided support for multiple ancestral acquisitions of lipoylation pathways during archaeal evolution. Second, with the exception of the Sulfolobales order, the majority of species possessing lipoylation systems exclusively retain LplA, or either LipB or LipM, consistent with archaeal genome streamlining. Third, obligate anaerobic archaea display widespread loss of lipoylation and OADHC genes. Conversely, a high level of correspondence is observed between aerobiosis and the presence of LplA/LipB/LipM, LipA and OADHC E2, consistent with the role of lipoylation in aerobic metabolism. This correspondence between OADHC lipoylation capacity and aerobiosis indicates that genomic pathway profiling in archaea is informative and that well characterized pathways may be predictive in relation to abiotic conditions in difficult-to-study extremophiles. Given the highly variable retention of gene repertoires across the archaea, the extension of comparative genomic pathway profiling to broader metabolic and homeostasis networks should be useful in revealing characteristics from metagenomic datasets related to adaptations to diverse environments.

Victoria I. Bunik – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the 2 Oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes in mitochondria can produce superoxide hydrogen peroxide at much higher rates than complex i
    Journal of Biological Chemistry, 2014
    Co-Authors: Casey L. Quinlan, Victoria I. Bunik, Renata L.s. Goncalves, Nagendra Yadava, Martin Heymogensen, Martin D. Brand

    Abstract:

    Several flavin-dependent enzymes of the mitochondrial matrix utilize NAD+ or NADH at about the same operating redox potential as the NADH/NAD+ pool and comprise the NADH/NAD+ isopotential enzyme group. Complex I (specifically the flavin, site IF) is often regarded as the major source of matrix superoxide/H2O2 production at this redox potential. However, the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (OGDH), branched-chain 2Oxoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH), and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complexes are also capable of considerable superoxide/H2O2 production. To differentiate the superoxide/H2O2-producing capacities of these different mitochondrial sites in situ, we compared the observed rates of H2O2 production over a range of different NAD(P)H reduction levels in isolated skeletal muscle mitochondria under conditions that favored superoxide/H2O2 production from complex I, the OGDH complex, the BCKDH complex, or the PDH complex. The rates from all four complexes increased at higher NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratios, although the 2Oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes produced superoxide/H2O2 at high rates only when oxidizing their specific 2Oxoacid substrates and not in the reverse reaction from NADH. At optimal conditions for each system, superoxide/H2O2 was produced by the OGDH complex at about twice the rate from the PDH complex, four times the rate from the BCKDH complex, and eight times the rate from site IF of complex I. Depending on the substrates present, the dominant sites of superoxide/H2O2 production at the level of NADH may be the OGDH and PDH complexes, but these activities may often be misattributed to complex I.

  • The 2Oxoacid Dehydrogenase Complexes in Mitochondria Can Produce Superoxide/Hydrogen Peroxide at Much Higher Rates than Complex I
    Journal of Biological Chemistry, 2014
    Co-Authors: Casey L. Quinlan, Victoria I. Bunik, Renata L.s. Goncalves, Martin Hey-mogensen, Nagendra Yadava, Martin D. Brand

    Abstract:

    Several flavin-dependent enzymes of the mitochondrial matrix utilize NAD+ or NADH at about the same operating redox potential as the NADH/NAD+ pool and comprise the NADH/NAD+ isopotential enzyme group. Complex I (specifically the flavin, site IF) is often regarded as the major source of matrix superoxide/H2O2 production at this redox potential. However, the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (OGDH), branched-chain 2Oxoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH), and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complexes are also capable of considerable superoxide/H2O2 production. To differentiate the superoxide/H2O2-producing capacities of these different mitochondrial sites in situ, we compared the observed rates of H2O2 production over a range of different NAD(P)H reduction levels in isolated skeletal muscle mitochondria under conditions that favored superoxide/H2O2 production from complex I, the OGDH complex, the BCKDH complex, or the PDH complex. The rates from all four complexes increased at higher NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratios, although the 2Oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes produced superoxide/H2O2 at high rates only when oxidizing their specific 2Oxoacid substrates and not in the reverse reaction from NADH. At optimal conditions for each system, superoxide/H2O2 was produced by the OGDH complex at about twice the rate from the PDH complex, four times the rate from the BCKDH complex, and eight times the rate from site IF of complex I. Depending on the substrates present, the dominant sites of superoxide/H2O2 production at the level of NADH may be the OGDH and PDH complexes, but these activities may often be misattributed to complex I.

  • Interaction of thioredoxins with target proteins: role of particular structural elements and electrostatic properties of thioredoxins in their interplay with 2Oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes.
    Protein Science, 2008
    Co-Authors: Victoria I. Bunik, Günter Raddatz, Stéphane D. Lemaire, Yves Meyer, Jean-pierre Jacquot, Hans Bisswanger

    Abstract:

    The thioredoxin action upon the 2Oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes is investigated by using different thioredoxins, both wild-type and mutated. The attacking cysteine residue of thioredoxin is established to be essential for the thioredoxin-dependent activation of the complexes. Mutation of the buried cysteine residue to serine is not crucial for the activation, but prevents inhibition of the complexes, exhibited by the Clamydomonas reinhardtii thioredoxin m disulfide. Site-directed mutagenesis of D26, W31, F/W12, and Y/A70 (the Escherichia coli thioredoxin numbering is employed for all the thioredoxins studied) indicates that both the active site and remote residues of thioredoxin are involved in its interplay with the 2Oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes. Sequences of 11 thioredoxin species tested biochemically are aligned. The thioredoxin residues at the contact between the alpha3/3(10) and alpha1 helices, the length of the alpha1 helix and the charges in the alpha2-beta3 and beta4-beta5 linkers are found to correlate with the protein influence on the 2Oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes (the secondary structural elements of thioredoxin are defined according to Eklund H et al., 1991, Proteins 11:13-28). The distribution of the charges on the surface of the thioredoxin molecules is analyzed. The analysis reveals the species specific polarization of the thioredoxin active site surroundings, which corresponds to the efficiency of the thioredoxin interplay with the 2Oxoacid dehydrogenase systems. The most effective mitochondrial thioredoxin is characterized by the strongest polarization of this area and the highest value of the electrostatic dipole vector of the molecule. Not only the magnitude, but also the orientation of the dipole vector show correlation with the thioredoxin action. The dipole direction is found to be significantly influenced by the charges of the residues 13/14, 51, and 83/85, which distinguish the activating and inhibiting thioredoxin disulfides.

David W. Hough – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Why are the 2Oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes so large? Generation of an active trimeric complex
    Biochemical Journal, 2014
    Co-Authors: Nia L. Marrott, David W. Hough, Jacqueline J. T. Marshall, Dmitri I. Svergun, Susan J. Crennell, Jean M. H. Van Den Elsen, Michael J. Danson

    Abstract:

    The four-component polypeptides of the 2Oxoacid dehydrogenase complex from the thermophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum assemble to give an active multienzyme complex possessing activity with the branched-chain 2Oxoacids derived from leucine, isoleucine and valine, and with pyruvate. The dihydrolipoyl acyl-transferase (E2) core of the complex is composed of identical trimer-forming units that assemble into a novel 42-mer structure comprising octahedral and icosahedral geometric aspects. From our previously determined structure of this catalytic core, the inter-trimer interactions involve a tyrosine residue near the C-terminus secured in a hydrophobic pocket of an adjacent trimer like a ball-and-socket joint. In the present study, we have deleted the five C-terminal amino acids of the E2 polypeptide (IIYEI) and shown by equilibrium centrifugation that it now only assembles into a trimeric enzyme. This was confirmed by SAXS analysis, although this technique showed the presence of approximately 20% hexamers. The crystal structure of the trimeric truncated E2 core has been determined and shown to be virtually identical with the ones observed in the 42-mer, demonstrating that removal of the C-terminal anchor does not significantly affect the individual monomer or trimer structures. The truncated E2 is still able to bind both 2Oxoacid decarboxylase (E1) and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3) components to give an active complex with catalytic activity similar to the native multienzyme complex. This is the first report of an active mini-complex for this enzyme, and raises the question of why all 2Oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes assemble into such large structures.

  • the catalytic core of an archaeal 2 Oxoacid dehydrogenase multienzyme complex is a 42 mer protein assembly
    FEBS Journal, 2012
    Co-Authors: Nia L. Marrott, Michael J. Danson, David W. Hough, Jacqueline J. T. Marshall, Dmitri I. Svergun, Susan J. Crennell, Jean M. H. Van Den Elsen

    Abstract:

    The dihydrolipoyl acyl-transferase (E2) enzyme forms the structural and catalytic core of the tripartite 2Oxoacid dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes of the central metabolic pathways. Although this family of multienzyme complexes shares a common architecture, their E2 cores form homo-trimers that, depending on the source, further associate into either octahedral (24-mer) or icosahedral (60-mer) assemblies, as predicted by the principles of quasi-equivalence. In the crystal structure of the E2 core from Thermoplasma acidophilum, a thermophilic archaeon, the homo-trimers assemble into a unique 42-mer oblate spheroid. Analytical equilibrium centrifugation and small-angle X-ray scattering analyses confirm that this catalytically active 1.08 MDa assembly exists as a single species in solution, forming a hollow spheroid with a maximum diameter of 220 A. In this paper we show that a monodisperse macromolecular assembly, built from identical subunits in non-identical environments, forms an irregular protein shell via non-equivalent interactions. This unusually irregular protein shell, combining cubic and dodecahedral geometrical elements, expands on the concept of quasi-equivalence as a basis for understanding macromolecular assemblies by showing that cubic point group symmetry is not a physical requirement in multienzyme assembly. These results extend our basic knowledge of protein assembly and greatly expand the number of possibilities to manipulate self-assembling biological complexes to be utilized in innovative nanotechnology applications.

    Database

    The final coordinates of the E2 structure have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB accession code 3RQC)

    Structured digital abstract


     E2 and E2 bind by x-ray crystallography (View interaction)


     E2 and E2 bind by x ray scattering (View interaction)

  • The catalytic core of an archaeal 2Oxoacid dehydrogenase multienzyme complex is a 42‐mer protein assembly
    FEBS Journal, 2012
    Co-Authors: Nia L. Marrott, Michael J. Danson, David W. Hough, Jacqueline J. T. Marshall, Dmitri I. Svergun, Susan J. Crennell, Jean M. H. Van Den Elsen

    Abstract:

    The dihydrolipoyl acyl-transferase (E2) enzyme forms the structural and catalytic core of the tripartite 2Oxoacid dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes of the central metabolic pathways. Although this family of multienzyme complexes shares a common architecture, their E2 cores form homo-trimers that, depending on the source, further associate into either octahedral (24-mer) or icosahedral (60-mer) assemblies, as predicted by the principles of quasi-equivalence. In the crystal structure of the E2 core from Thermoplasma acidophilum, a thermophilic archaeon, the homo-trimers assemble into a unique 42-mer oblate spheroid. Analytical equilibrium centrifugation and small-angle X-ray scattering analyses confirm that this catalytically active 1.08 MDa assembly exists as a single species in solution, forming a hollow spheroid with a maximum diameter of 220 A. In this paper we show that a monodisperse macromolecular assembly, built from identical subunits in non-identical environments, forms an irregular protein shell via non-equivalent interactions. This unusually irregular protein shell, combining cubic and dodecahedral geometrical elements, expands on the concept of quasi-equivalence as a basis for understanding macromolecular assemblies by showing that cubic point group symmetry is not a physical requirement in multienzyme assembly. These results extend our basic knowledge of protein assembly and greatly expand the number of possibilities to manipulate self-assembling biological complexes to be utilized in innovative nanotechnology applications.

    Database

    The final coordinates of the E2 structure have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB accession code 3RQC)

    Structured digital abstract


     E2 and E2 bind by x-ray crystallography (View interaction)


     E2 and E2 bind by x ray scattering (View interaction)