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3-Methylthiophene

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Nobuhide Watanabe – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • convenient method for the preparation of the 2 methyl thiophen 3 yl magnesium bromide lithium chloride complex and its application to the synthesis of 3 substituted 2 methylthiophenes
    ChemInform, 2013
    Co-Authors: Masakazu Kogami, Nobuhide Watanabe
    Abstract:

    LiCl significantly accelerates the formation of Grignard reagent from inactive 3-bromo-2-methylthiophene (I) and thus provides access to a variety of 3-substituted 2-methylthiophenes (15 examples).

  • convenient method for the preparation of the 2 methyl thiophen 3 yl magnesium bromide lithium chloride complex and its application to the synthesis of 3 substituted 2 methylthiophenes
    Synthetic Communications, 2013
    Co-Authors: Masakazu Kogami, Nobuhide Watanabe
    Abstract:

    Abstract Lithium chloride was found to accelerate formation of the Grignard reagent from inactive 3-bromo-2-methylthiophene (1) and commercial magnesium metal. Based on this finding, a convenient and potentially scalable preparation of ethyl 2-methylthiophene-3-carboxylate (3) was achieved. In addition, this process has been found to provide a new, general approach to 3-substituted 2-methylthiophenes.

Masakazu Kogami – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • convenient method for the preparation of the 2 methyl thiophen 3 yl magnesium bromide lithium chloride complex and its application to the synthesis of 3 substituted 2 methylthiophenes
    ChemInform, 2013
    Co-Authors: Masakazu Kogami, Nobuhide Watanabe
    Abstract:

    LiCl significantly accelerates the formation of Grignard reagent from inactive 3-bromo-2-methylthiophene (I) and thus provides access to a variety of 3-substituted 2-methylthiophenes (15 examples).

  • convenient method for the preparation of the 2 methyl thiophen 3 yl magnesium bromide lithium chloride complex and its application to the synthesis of 3 substituted 2 methylthiophenes
    Synthetic Communications, 2013
    Co-Authors: Masakazu Kogami, Nobuhide Watanabe
    Abstract:

    Abstract Lithium chloride was found to accelerate formation of the Grignard reagent from inactive 3-bromo-2-methylthiophene (1) and commercial magnesium metal. Based on this finding, a convenient and potentially scalable preparation of ethyl 2-methylthiophene-3-carboxylate (3) was achieved. In addition, this process has been found to provide a new, general approach to 3-substituted 2-methylthiophenes.

Peter G. Pickup – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • X-ray emission analysis of thin poly(3-Methylthiophene) and poly{(3-Methylthiophene)-co-[1-methyl-3-(pyrrol-1-ylmethyl)pyridinium]} films. Composition, oxidation level, and overoxidation
    Analytical Chemistry, 1993
    Co-Authors: Peter G. Pickup
    Abstract:

    X-ray emission spectroscopy (electron microprobe analysis) has been to determine CI:S atomic ratios in thin (0.1-5 μm) films of poly(3-Methylthiophene) and poly{(3-Methylthiophene)-co-[1-methyl-3-(pyrrol-1-ylmethyl)pyridinium]} on carbon and Pt electrodes. The composition of a copolymer films is given directly by the CI:S ratio for the reduced copolymer with perchlorate counterions. The thiophene content of the copolymers increases with increasing polymerization current density

  • Reactivation of poly(3-Methylthiophene) following overoxidation in the presence of chloride
    Journal of the Chemical Society Chemical Communications, 1992
    Co-Authors: Peter G. Pickup
    Abstract:

    Poly(3-Methylthiophene) films made electrochemically inactive by overoxidation in the presence of Cl– can be reactivated both electrochemically and chemically to produce a partially chlorinated conducting polymer.

  • In situ conductivity of poly-(3-Methylthiophene) and (3-Methylthiophene)x-[Ru(2,2′-bipyridine)2(3-{pyrrol-1-ylmethyl}pyridine)2]2+
    Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry and Interfacial Electrochemistry, 1991
    Co-Authors: Jolanta Ochmanska, Peter G. Pickup
    Abstract:

    Abstract The in situ electronic conductivities of poly(3-Methylthiophene) and (3-Methylthiophene) x -[Ru(bp) 2 (pmp) 2 ](ClO 4 ) 2 copolymers (bp = 2,2′-bipyridine, pmp = 3-(pyrrol-1-ylmethyl)pyridine) have been investigated by dual (sandwich) electrode voltammetry and rotating disc voltammetry. The experimental data have been treated using an ohmic conductivity model which takes into account the variation in conductivity across the film. The conductivity of the methylthiophene homopolymer increases exponentially with a slope of 96 mV/decade from ca. 10 −8 Ω −1 cm −1 at 0 V vs. SSCE to ca. 1 Ω −1 cm −1 at +0.8 V. Significant hysteresis is observed in the conductivity vs potential data; the conductivity of the polymer is generally higher during reduction than during oxidation at the same potential. Copolymerization of the Ru complex with 3-Methylthiophene results in films with a much lower conductivity at all potentials. In terms of an electron hopping model the Ru sites lead to a substantial decrease in the electron hopping rate between oxidized poly(3-Methylthiophene) sites. The maximum conductivity of the copolymer films decreases exponentially with increasing Ru concentration as predicted by such a model. A secondary effect of the Ru sites is to increase the average redox potential of the poly(3-Methylthiophene) so that higher potentials are required to produce charge carriers (oxidized sites).