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Michael Savin – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Greenfield filter fixation in large venae cavae.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology : JVIR, 1998
    Co-Authors: Michael Savin, Richard D. Shlansky-goldberg
    Abstract:

    It is generally thought that the Greenfield filter should not be placed in inferior venae cavae (IVCs) that are larger than 28 mm in diameter because of its base diameter. However, the newer versions have larger base diameters. The purpose of this study was to evaluate fixation of the three currently available Greenfield filters in large IVCs. Filter fixation was tested in an ex vivo perfusion system with a 34-mm-diameter equine IVC. Greenfield filters with base diameters of 30 mm (original 24-F version [24-F GF]), 38 mm (percutaneous titanium [TGF]), and 32 mm (percutaneous stainless steel [SGF]) were deployed. Increasing force was then applied in a cephalic direction and the resultant movement was measured. In a 34-mm-diameter IVC, the TGF and SGF demonstrated significantly less movement than did the 24-F GF (P < .001). None of the TGFs or SGFs moved above the renal veins with a 480-g pull. Three of the seven 24-F GFs moved above the renal veins at 30 g. No significant difference in fixation was demonstrated between the TGF and the SGF (P = .6). In a 34-mm-diameter IVC, fixation of the TGF and SGF was significantly better than the 24-F GF. The TGF and SGF may not be subject to the same 28-mm-diameter IVC size limitation as the 24-F GF.

  • greenfield filter fixation in large venae cavae
    Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, 1998
    Co-Authors: Michael Savin, Richard D Shlanskygoldberg
    Abstract:

    Purpose It is generally thought that the Greenfield filter should not be placed in inferior venae cavae (IVCs) that are larger than 28 mm in diameter because of its base diameter. However, the newer versions have larger base diameters. The purpose of this study was to evaluate fixation of the three currently available Greenfield filters in large IVCs. Materials and Methods Filter fixation was tested in an ex vivo perfusion system with a 34-mm-diameter equine IVC. Greenfield filters with base diameters of 30 mm (original 24-F version [24-F GF]), 38 mm (percutaneous titanium [TGF]), and 32 mm (percutaneous stainless steel [SGF]) were deployed. Increasing force was then applied in a cephalic direction and the resultant movement was measured. Results In a 34-mm-diameter IVC, the TGF and SGF demonstrated significantly less movement than did the 24-F GF ( P P =.6). Conclusions In a 34-mm-diameter IVC, fixation of the TGF and SGF was significantly better than the 24-F GF. The TGF and SGF may not be subject to the same 28-mm-diameter IVC size limitation as the 24-F GF.

Josef Havel – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • formation of aluminium aluminium nitride and nitrogen clusters via laser ablation of nano aluminium nitride laser desorption ionisation and matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation time of flight mass spectrometry
    Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 2011
    Co-Authors: Nagender Reddy Panyala, Vadym Prysiazhnyi, Pavel Slavíček, Mirko Černák, Josef Havel
    Abstract:

    Laser Desorption Ionisation (LDI) and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation (MALDI) Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (TOFMS) were used to study the pulsed laser ablation of aluminium nitride (AlN) nano powder. The formation of Alm+ (m = 1–3), Nn+ (n = 4, 5), AlNn+ (n = 1–5, 19, 21), AlmN+ (m = 2–3), Al3N2+, Al9Nn+ (n = 5, 7, 9, 11 and 15), Al11Nn+ (n = 4, 6, 10, 12, 19, 21, 23, and 25), and Al13Nn+ (n = 25, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, and 36) clusters was detected in positive ion mode. Similarly, Alm– (m = 1–3), AlNn– (n = 1–3, 5), AlmN– (m = 2, 3), Al2Nn– (n = 2–4, 28, 30), Nn– (n = 2, 3), Al4N7–, Al8Nn– (n = 1–6), and Al13Nn– (n = 9, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 33, 35, 37, 39, 41 and 43) clusters were observed in negative ion mode. The formation of the stoichiometric Al10N10 cluster was shown to be of low abundance. On the contrary, the laser ablation of nano-AlN led mainly to the formation of nitrogen-rich AlmNn clusters in both negative and positive ion mode. The stoichiometry of the AlmNn clusters was determined via isotopic envelope analysis and computer modelling. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Mirko Černák – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • formation of aluminium aluminium nitride and nitrogen clusters via laser ablation of nano aluminium nitride laser desorption ionisation and matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation time of flight mass spectrometry
    Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 2011
    Co-Authors: Nagender Reddy Panyala, Vadym Prysiazhnyi, Pavel Slavíček, Mirko Černák, Josef Havel
    Abstract:

    Laser Desorption Ionisation (LDI) and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation (MALDI) Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (TOFMS) were used to study the pulsed laser ablation of aluminium nitride (AlN) nano powder. The formation of Alm+ (m = 1–3), Nn+ (n = 4, 5), AlNn+ (n = 1–5, 19, 21), AlmN+ (m = 2–3), Al3N2+, Al9Nn+ (n = 5, 7, 9, 11 and 15), Al11Nn+ (n = 4, 6, 10, 12, 19, 21, 23, and 25), and Al13Nn+ (n = 25, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, and 36) clusters was detected in positive ion mode. Similarly, Alm– (m = 1–3), AlNn– (n = 1–3, 5), AlmN– (m = 2, 3), Al2Nn– (n = 2–4, 28, 30), Nn– (n = 2, 3), Al4N7–, Al8Nn– (n = 1–6), and Al13Nn– (n = 9, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 33, 35, 37, 39, 41 and 43) clusters were observed in negative ion mode. The formation of the stoichiometric Al10N10 cluster was shown to be of low abundance. On the contrary, the laser ablation of nano-AlN led mainly to the formation of nitrogen-rich AlmNn clusters in both negative and positive ion mode. The stoichiometry of the AlmNn clusters was determined via isotopic envelope analysis and computer modelling. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.