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ABCA7

The Experts below are selected from a list of 1722 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Brett Garner – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • ABCA7 deletion does not affect adult neurogenesis in the mouse
    Bioscience Reports, 2016
    Co-Authors: Brett Garner, Tim Karl, Hongyun Li

    Abstract:

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A7 (ABCA7) is highly expressed in the brain. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified ABCA7 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that increase Alzheimer’s disease (AD) risk, however, the mechanisms by which ABCA7 may control AD risk remain to be fully elucidated. Based on previous research suggesting that certain ABC transporters may play a role in the regulation of neurogenesis, we conducted a study of cell proliferation and neurogenic potential using cellular bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and doublecortin (DCX) immunostaining in adult ABCA7 deficient mice and wild-type-like (WT) littermates. In the present study counting of BrdU-positive and DCX-positive cells in an established adult neurogenesis site in the dentate gyrus (DG) indicated there were no significant differences when WT and ABCA7 deficient mice were compared. We also measured the area occupied by immunohistochemical staining for BrdU and DCX in the DG and the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the same mice and this confirmed that ABCA7 does not play a significant role in the regulation of cell proliferation or neurogenesis in the adult mouse.

  • understanding the function of ABCA7 in alzheimer s disease
    Biochemical Society Transactions, 2015
    Co-Authors: Brett Garner, Tim Karl, Hongyun Li

    Abstract:

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A7 (ABCA7) is highly expressed in the brain. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identify ABCA7 single nt polymorphisms (SNPs) that increase Alzheimer9s disease (AD) risk. It is now important to understand the true function of ABCA7 in the AD context. We have begun to address this using in vitro and in vivo AD models. Our initial studies showed that transient overexpression of ABCA7 in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing human amyloid precursor protein (APP) resulted in an approximate 50% inhibition in the production of the AD-related amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide as compared with mock-transfected cells. This increased ABCA7 expression was also associated with alterations in other markers of APP processing and an accumulation of cellular APP. To probe for a function of ABCA7 in vivo , we crossed ABCA7 −/− mice with J20 mice, an amyloidogenic transgenic AD mouse model [B6.Cg-Tg(PDGFB-APPSwInd)20Lms/J] expressing a mutant form of human APP bearing both the Swedish (K670N/M671L) and Indiana (V717F) familial AD mutations. We found that ABCA7 loss doubled insoluble Aβ levels and amyloid plaques in the brain. This did not appear to be related to changes in APP processing (C-terminal fragment analysis), which led us to assess other mechanism by which ABCA7 may modulate Aβ homoeostasis. As we have shown that microglia express high levels of ABCA7, we examined a role for ABCA7 in the phagocytic clearance of Aβ. Our data indicated that the capacity for bone marrow-derived macrophages derived from ABCA7 −/− mice to phagocytose Aβ was reduced by 51% compared with wild-type (WT) mice. This suggests ABCA7 plays a role in the regulation of Aβ homoeostasis in the brain and that this may be related to Aβ clearance by microglia.

  • role of ABCA7 in mouse behaviours relevant to neurodegenerative diseases
    PLOS ONE, 2012
    Co-Authors: Warren Logge, Brett Garner, David Cheng, Rose Chesworth, Surabhi Bhatia, Tim Karl

    Abstract:

    ATP-binding cassette transporters of the subfamily A (ABCA) are responsible for the translocation of lipids including cholesterol, which is crucial for neurological function. Recent studies suggest that the ABC transporter ABCA7 may play a role in the development of brain disorders such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease. However, ABCA7’s role in cognition and other behaviours has not been investigated. Therefore, we characterised homozygous ABCA7 knockout mice in a battery of tests for baseline behaviours (i.e. physical exam, baseline locomotion and anxiety) and behaviours relevant to schizophrenia (i.e. prepulse inhibition and locomotor response to psychotropic drugs) and Alzheimer’s disease (i.e. cognitive domains). Knockout mice had normal motor functions and sensory abilities and performed the same as wild type-like animals in anxiety tasks. Short-term spatial memory and fear-associated learning was also intact in ABCA7 knockout mice. However, male knockout mice exhibited significantly impaired novel object recognition memory. Task acquisition was unaffected in the cheeseboard task. Female mice exhibited impaired spatial reference memory. This phenomenon was more pronounced in female ABCA7 null mice. Acoustic startle response, sensorimotor gating and baseline locomotion was unaltered in ABCA7 knockout mice. Female knockouts showed a moderately increased motor response to MK-801 than control mice. In conclusion, ABCA7 appears to play only a minor role in behavioural domains with a subtle sex-specific impact on particular cognitive domains.

Robert S Molday – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • differential phospholipid substrates and directional transport by atp binding cassette proteins abca1 ABCA7 and abca4 and disease causing mutants
    Journal of Biological Chemistry, 2013
    Co-Authors: Faraz Quazi, Robert S Molday

    Abstract:

    Abstract ABCA1, ABCA7, and ABCA4 are members of the ABCA subfamily of ATP-binding cassette transporters which share extensive sequence and structural similarity. Mutations in ABCA1 cause Tangier disease characterized by defective cholesterol homeostasis and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) deficiency. Mutations in ABCA4 are responsible for Stargardt disease, a degenerative disorder associated with severe loss in central vision. Although cell-based studies have implicated ABCA proteins in lipid transport, the substrates and direction of transport have not been firmly established. We have purified and reconstituted ABCA1, ABCA7 and ABCA4 into liposomes for fluorescent-lipid transport studies. ABCA1 actively exported or flipped phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylserine (PS), and sphingomyelin (SM) from the cytoplasmic to the exocytoplasmic leaflet of membranes, whereas ABCA7 preferentially exported PS. In contrast ABCA4 transported phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in the reverse direction. The same phospholipids stimulated the ATPase activity of these ABCA transporters. The transport activity and ATPase activity of ABCA1 and ABCA4 was reduced by 25% in the presence of 20% cholesterol. Nine ABCA1 Tangier mutants and corresponding ABCA4 Stargardt mutants showed significantly reduced phospholipid transport activity and subcellular mislocalization. These studies provide the first direct evidence for ABCA1 and ABCA7 functioning as phospholipid transporters and suggest that this activity is an essential step in the loading of ApoA-1 with phospholipids for HDL formation.

  • differential phospholipid substrates and directional transport by atp binding cassette proteins abca1 ABCA7 and abca4 and disease causing mutants
    Journal of Biological Chemistry, 2013
    Co-Authors: Faraz Quazi, Robert S Molday

    Abstract:

    ABCA1, ABCA7, and ABCA4 are members of the ABCA subfamily of ATP-binding cassette transporters that share extensive sequence and structural similarity. Mutations in ABCA1 cause Tangier disease characterized by defective cholesterol homeostasis and high density lipoprotein (HDL) deficiency. Mutations in ABCA4 are responsible for Stargardt disease, a degenerative disorder associated with severe loss in central vision. Although cell-based studies have implicated ABCA proteins in lipid transport, the substrates and direction of transport have not been firmly established. We have purified and reconstituted ABCA1, ABCA7, and ABCA4 into liposomes for fluorescent-lipid transport studies. ABCA1 actively exported or flipped phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, and sphingomyelin from the cytoplasmic to the exocytoplasmic leaflet of membranes, whereas ABCA7 preferentially exported phosphatidylserine. In contrast, ABCA4 transported phosphatidylethanolamine in the reverse direction. The same phospholipids stimulated the ATPase activity of these ABCA transporters. The transport and ATPase activities of ABCA1 and ABCA4 were reduced by 25% in the presence of 20% cholesterol. Nine ABCA1 Tangier mutants and the corresponding ABCA4 Stargardt mutants showed significantly reduced phospholipid transport activity and subcellular mislocalization. These studies provide the first direct evidence for ABCA1 and ABCA7 functioning as phospholipid transporters and suggest that this activity is an essential step in the loading of apoA-1 with phospholipids for HDL formation.

  • the role of the photoreceptor abc transporter abca4 in lipid transport and stargardt macular degeneration
    Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, 2009
    Co-Authors: Robert S Molday, Ming Zhong, Faraz Quazi

    Abstract:

    Abstract ABCA4 is a member of the ABCA subfamily of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters that is expressed in rod and cone photoreceptors of the vertebrate retina. ABCA4, also known as the Rim protein and ABCR, is a large 2273 amino acid glycoprotein organized as two tandem halves, each containing a single membrane spanning segment followed sequentially by a large exocytoplasmic domain, a multispanning membrane domain and a nucleotide binding domain. Over 500 mutations in the gene encoding ABCA4 are associated with a spectrum of related autosomal recessive retinal degenerative diseases including Stargardt macular degeneration, cone–rod dystrophy and a subset of retinitis pigmentosa. Biochemical studies on the purified ABCA4 together with analysis of abca4 knockout mice and patients with Stargardt disease have implicated ABCA4 as a retinylidene-phosphatidylethanolamine transporter that facilitates the removal of potentially reactive retinal derivatives from photoreceptors following photoexcitation. Knowledge of the genetic and molecular basis for ABCA4 related retinal degenerative diseases is being used to develop rationale therapeutic treatments for this set of disorders.

Arne De Roeck – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • the role of ABCA7 in alzheimer s disease evidence from genomics transcriptomics and methylomics
    Acta Neuropathologica, 2019
    Co-Authors: Arne De Roeck, Christine Van Broeckhoven, Kristel Sleegers

    Abstract:

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) originally identified ATP-binding cassette, sub-family A, member 7 (ABCA7), as a novel risk gene of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Since then, accumulating evidence from in vitro, in vivo, and human-based studies has corroborated and extended this association, promoting ABCA7 as one of the most important risk genes of both early-onset and late-onset AD, harboring both common and rare risk variants with relatively large effect on AD risk. Within this review, we provide a comprehensive assessment of the literature on ABCA7, with a focus on AD-related human -omics studies (e.g. genomics, transcriptomics, and methylomics). In European and African American populations, indirect ABCA7 GWAS associations are explained by expansion of an ABCA7 variable number tandem repeat (VNTR), and a common premature termination codon (PTC) variant, respectively. Rare ABCA7 PTC variants are strongly enriched in AD patients, and some of these have displayed inheritance patterns resembling autosomal dominant AD. In addition, rare missense variants are more frequent in AD patients than healthy controls, whereas a common ABCA7 missense variant may protect from disease. Methylation at several CpG sites in the ABCA7 locus is significantly associated with AD. Furthermore, ABCA7 contains many different isoforms and ABCA7 splicing has been shown to associate with AD. Besides associations with disease status, these genetic and epigenetic ABCA7 markers also showed significant correlations with AD endophenotypes; in particular amyloid deposition and brain morphology. In conclusion, human-based –omics studies provide converging evidence of (partial) ABCA7 loss as an AD pathomechanism, and future studies should make clear if interventions on ABCA7 expression can serve as a valuable therapeutic target for AD.

  • The role of ABCA7 in Alzheimer’s disease: evidence from genomics, transcriptomics and methylomics
    Acta Neuropathologica, 2019
    Co-Authors: Arne De Roeck, Christine Van Broeckhoven, Kristel Sleegers

    Abstract:

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) originally identified ATP-binding cassette, sub-family A, member 7 (ABCA7), as a novel risk gene of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Since then, accumulating evidence from in vitro, in vivo, and human-based studies has corroborated and extended this association, promoting ABCA7 as one of the most important risk genes of both early-onset and late-onset AD, harboring both common and rare risk variants with relatively large effect on AD risk. Within this review, we provide a comprehensive assessment of the literature on ABCA7, with a focus on AD-related human -omics studies (e.g. genomics, transcriptomics, and methylomics). In European and African American populations, indirect ABCA7 GWAS associations are explained by expansion of an ABCA7 variable number tandem repeat (VNTR), and a common premature termination codon (PTC) variant, respectively. Rare ABCA7 PTC variants are strongly enriched in AD patients, and some of these have displayed inheritance patterns resembling autosomal dominant AD. In addition, rare missense variants are more frequent in AD patients than healthy controls, whereas a common ABCA7 missense variant may protect from disease. Methylation at several CpG sites in the ABCA7 locus is significantly associated with AD. Furthermore, ABCA7 contains many different isoforms and ABCA7 splicing has been shown to associate with AD. Besides associations with disease status, these genetic and epigenetic ABCA7 markers also showed significant correlations with AD endophenotypes; in particular amyloid deposition and brain morphology. In conclusion, human-based –omics studies provide converging evidence of (partial) ABCA7 loss as an AD pathomechanism, and future studies should make clear if interventions on ABCA7 expression can serve as a valuable therapeutic target for AD.

  • An intronic VNTR affects splicing of ABCA7 and increases risk of Alzheimer’s disease
    Acta Neuropathologica, 2018
    Co-Authors: Arne De Roeck, Tobi Bossche, Jasper Dongen, Lena Duchateau, Rita Cacace, Maria Bjerke, Patrick Cras, Rik Vandenberghe, Peter P. De Deyn, Sebastiaan Engelborghs

    Abstract:

    Mutations leading to premature termination codons in ATP-Binding Cassette Subfamily A Member 7 ( ABCA7 ) are high penetrant risk factors of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The influence of other genetic variants in ABCA7 and downstream functional mechanisms, however, is poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, we investigated tandem repetitive regions in ABCA7 in a Belgian cohort of 1529 AD patients and control individuals and identified an intronic variable number tandem repeat (VNTR). We observed strong association between VNTR length and a genome-wide associated signal for AD in the ABCA7 locus. Expanded VNTR alleles were highly enriched in AD patients [odds ratio = 4.5 (1.3–24.2)], and VNTR length inversely correlated with amyloid β_1–42 in cerebrospinal fluid and ABCA7 expression. In addition, we identified three novel ABCA7 alternative splicing events. One isoform in particular—which is formed through exon 19 skipping—lacks the first nucleotide binding domain of ABCA7 and is abundant in brain tissue. We observed a tight correlation between exon 19 skipping and VNTR length. Our findings underline the importance of studying repetitive DNA in complex disorders and expand the contribution of genetic and transcript variation in ABCA7 to AD.