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Abdominal Surgery

The Experts below are selected from a list of 294 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Harry Goor – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Prior Abdominal Surgery Jeopardizes Quality of Resection in Colorectal Cancer
    World Journal of Surgery, 2016
    Co-Authors: Martijn W. J. Stommel, Johannes H. W. Wilt, Richard P. G. Ten Broek, Chema Strik, Maroeska M. Rovers, Harry Goor

    Abstract:

    Background Prior Abdominal Surgery increases complexity of Abdominal operations. Effort to prevent injury during adhesiolysis might result in less extensive bowel resection in colorectal cancer Surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of prior Abdominal Surgery on the outcome of colorectal cancer Surgery. Methods A nationwide prospective database of patients with primary colorectal cancer resection in The Netherlands between 2010 and 2012 was reviewed for histopathology, morbidity and mortality in patients with compared to patients without prior Abdominal Surgery. Results 9042 patients with and 17,679 without prior Abdominal Surgery were analyzed. After prior Abdominal Surgery 20.7 % had less than 10 lymph nodes in the histopathological specimen compared to 17.8 % without prior Abdominal Surgery (adjusted OR 1.17, 95 % CI 1.09–1.26). Adjusted ORs for less than 10 and 12 lymph nodes were significant in colon cancer resection and not in rectal cancer resection. Subgroups of patients who had previous hepatobiliary Surgery or other Abdominal Surgery had a higher incidence of inadequate number of harvested lymph nodes. Prior colorectal Surgery increased the percentage of positive circumferential rectal resection margin by 64 % (12.5 and 7.6 %; adjusted OR 1.70, 95 % CI 1.21–2.39). For colon cancer morbidity was significantly higher in patients with prior Surgery (33.2 and 29.7 %; adjusted OR 1.18, 95 % CI 1.10–1.26), 30-day mortality was comparable (4.7 % prior Surgery and 3.8 % without prior Surgery; adjusted OR 1.01, 95 % CI 0.88–1.17). Conclusions Prior Abdominal Surgery compromises the quality of resection and increases postoperative morbidity in patients with primary colorectal cancer.

  • Risk factors for future repeat Abdominal Surgery.
    Langenbeck's Archives of Surgery, 2016
    Co-Authors: Chema Strik, Martijn W. J. Stommel, Harry Goor, Laura J. Schipper, Richard P. G. Ten Broek

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    Today, 40 to 66 % of elective procedures in Abdominal Surgery are reoperations. Reoperations show increased operative time and risk for intraoperative and postoperative complications, mainly due to the need to perform adhesiolysis. It is important to understand which patients will require repeat Surgery for optimal utilization and implementation of anti-adhesive strategies. Our aim is to assess the incidence and identify risk factors for repeat Abdominal Surgery.

  • Prior Abdominal Surgery Jeopardizes Quality of Resection in Colorectal Cancer
    World Journal of Surgery, 2016
    Co-Authors: Martijn W. J. Stommel, Johannes H. W. Wilt, Chema Strik, Maroeska M. Rovers, Richard P. G. Ten Broek, Harry Goor

    Abstract:

    Background
    Prior Abdominal Surgery increases complexity of Abdominal operations. Effort to prevent injury during adhesiolysis might result in less extensive bowel resection in colorectal cancer Surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of prior Abdominal Surgery on the outcome of colorectal cancer Surgery.

Chema Strik – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Prior Abdominal Surgery Jeopardizes Quality of Resection in Colorectal Cancer
    World Journal of Surgery, 2016
    Co-Authors: Martijn W. J. Stommel, Johannes H. W. Wilt, Richard P. G. Ten Broek, Chema Strik, Maroeska M. Rovers, Harry Goor

    Abstract:

    Background Prior Abdominal Surgery increases complexity of Abdominal operations. Effort to prevent injury during adhesiolysis might result in less extensive bowel resection in colorectal cancer Surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of prior Abdominal Surgery on the outcome of colorectal cancer Surgery. Methods A nationwide prospective database of patients with primary colorectal cancer resection in The Netherlands between 2010 and 2012 was reviewed for histopathology, morbidity and mortality in patients with compared to patients without prior Abdominal Surgery. Results 9042 patients with and 17,679 without prior Abdominal Surgery were analyzed. After prior Abdominal Surgery 20.7 % had less than 10 lymph nodes in the histopathological specimen compared to 17.8 % without prior Abdominal Surgery (adjusted OR 1.17, 95 % CI 1.09–1.26). Adjusted ORs for less than 10 and 12 lymph nodes were significant in colon cancer resection and not in rectal cancer resection. Subgroups of patients who had previous hepatobiliary Surgery or other Abdominal Surgery had a higher incidence of inadequate number of harvested lymph nodes. Prior colorectal Surgery increased the percentage of positive circumferential rectal resection margin by 64 % (12.5 and 7.6 %; adjusted OR 1.70, 95 % CI 1.21–2.39). For colon cancer morbidity was significantly higher in patients with prior Surgery (33.2 and 29.7 %; adjusted OR 1.18, 95 % CI 1.10–1.26), 30-day mortality was comparable (4.7 % prior Surgery and 3.8 % without prior Surgery; adjusted OR 1.01, 95 % CI 0.88–1.17). Conclusions Prior Abdominal Surgery compromises the quality of resection and increases postoperative morbidity in patients with primary colorectal cancer.

  • Risk factors for future repeat Abdominal Surgery.
    Langenbeck's Archives of Surgery, 2016
    Co-Authors: Chema Strik, Martijn W. J. Stommel, Harry Goor, Laura J. Schipper, Richard P. G. Ten Broek

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    Today, 40 to 66 % of elective procedures in Abdominal Surgery are reoperations. Reoperations show increased operative time and risk for intraoperative and postoperative complications, mainly due to the need to perform adhesiolysis. It is important to understand which patients will require repeat Surgery for optimal utilization and implementation of anti-adhesive strategies. Our aim is to assess the incidence and identify risk factors for repeat Abdominal Surgery.

  • Prior Abdominal Surgery Jeopardizes Quality of Resection in Colorectal Cancer
    World Journal of Surgery, 2016
    Co-Authors: Martijn W. J. Stommel, Johannes H. W. Wilt, Chema Strik, Maroeska M. Rovers, Richard P. G. Ten Broek, Harry Goor

    Abstract:

    Background
    Prior Abdominal Surgery increases complexity of Abdominal operations. Effort to prevent injury during adhesiolysis might result in less extensive bowel resection in colorectal cancer Surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of prior Abdominal Surgery on the outcome of colorectal cancer Surgery.

Martijn W. J. Stommel – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Prior Abdominal Surgery Jeopardizes Quality of Resection in Colorectal Cancer
    World Journal of Surgery, 2016
    Co-Authors: Martijn W. J. Stommel, Johannes H. W. Wilt, Richard P. G. Ten Broek, Chema Strik, Maroeska M. Rovers, Harry Goor

    Abstract:

    Background Prior Abdominal Surgery increases complexity of Abdominal operations. Effort to prevent injury during adhesiolysis might result in less extensive bowel resection in colorectal cancer Surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of prior Abdominal Surgery on the outcome of colorectal cancer Surgery. Methods A nationwide prospective database of patients with primary colorectal cancer resection in The Netherlands between 2010 and 2012 was reviewed for histopathology, morbidity and mortality in patients with compared to patients without prior Abdominal Surgery. Results 9042 patients with and 17,679 without prior Abdominal Surgery were analyzed. After prior Abdominal Surgery 20.7 % had less than 10 lymph nodes in the histopathological specimen compared to 17.8 % without prior Abdominal Surgery (adjusted OR 1.17, 95 % CI 1.09–1.26). Adjusted ORs for less than 10 and 12 lymph nodes were significant in colon cancer resection and not in rectal cancer resection. Subgroups of patients who had previous hepatobiliary Surgery or other Abdominal Surgery had a higher incidence of inadequate number of harvested lymph nodes. Prior colorectal Surgery increased the percentage of positive circumferential rectal resection margin by 64 % (12.5 and 7.6 %; adjusted OR 1.70, 95 % CI 1.21–2.39). For colon cancer morbidity was significantly higher in patients with prior Surgery (33.2 and 29.7 %; adjusted OR 1.18, 95 % CI 1.10–1.26), 30-day mortality was comparable (4.7 % prior Surgery and 3.8 % without prior Surgery; adjusted OR 1.01, 95 % CI 0.88–1.17). Conclusions Prior Abdominal Surgery compromises the quality of resection and increases postoperative morbidity in patients with primary colorectal cancer.

  • Risk factors for future repeat Abdominal Surgery.
    Langenbeck's Archives of Surgery, 2016
    Co-Authors: Chema Strik, Martijn W. J. Stommel, Harry Goor, Laura J. Schipper, Richard P. G. Ten Broek

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    Today, 40 to 66 % of elective procedures in Abdominal Surgery are reoperations. Reoperations show increased operative time and risk for intraoperative and postoperative complications, mainly due to the need to perform adhesiolysis. It is important to understand which patients will require repeat Surgery for optimal utilization and implementation of anti-adhesive strategies. Our aim is to assess the incidence and identify risk factors for repeat Abdominal Surgery.

  • Prior Abdominal Surgery Jeopardizes Quality of Resection in Colorectal Cancer
    World Journal of Surgery, 2016
    Co-Authors: Martijn W. J. Stommel, Johannes H. W. Wilt, Chema Strik, Maroeska M. Rovers, Richard P. G. Ten Broek, Harry Goor

    Abstract:

    Background
    Prior Abdominal Surgery increases complexity of Abdominal operations. Effort to prevent injury during adhesiolysis might result in less extensive bowel resection in colorectal cancer Surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of prior Abdominal Surgery on the outcome of colorectal cancer Surgery.