Abdominal Tumor - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab


Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Abdominal Tumor

The Experts below are selected from a list of 35742 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Abdominal Tumor – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Sylvie Bonvalot – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Abdominal desmoplastic small round cell Tumor multimodal treatment combining chemotherapy surgery and radiotherapy is the best option
    Annals of Surgical Oncology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Charles Honore, Koceila Amroun, Laurence Vilcot, Julien Domont, Philippe Terrier, Axel Le Cesne, Cecile Le Pechoux, Sylvie Bonvalot

    Abstract:

    Background
    With nearly 450 cases reported since 1991, desmoplastic small round cell Tumor (DSRCT) is a rare Abdominal Tumor typically arising in adolescent and young adult white men. With no large series described, the best therapeutic strategy remains unclear.

    Free Register to Access Article

Charles Honore – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Abdominal desmoplastic small round cell Tumor multimodal treatment combining chemotherapy surgery and radiotherapy is the best option
    Annals of Surgical Oncology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Charles Honore, Koceila Amroun, Laurence Vilcot, Julien Domont, Philippe Terrier, Axel Le Cesne, Cecile Le Pechoux, Sylvie Bonvalot

    Abstract:

    Background
    With nearly 450 cases reported since 1991, desmoplastic small round cell Tumor (DSRCT) is a rare Abdominal Tumor typically arising in adolescent and young adult white men. With no large series described, the best therapeutic strategy remains unclear.

    Free Register to Access Article

John A Kalapurakal – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • intraoperative spillage of favorable histology wilms Tumor cells influence of irradiation and chemotherapy regimens on Abdominal recurrence a report from the national wilms Tumor study group
    International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, 2010
    Co-Authors: John A Kalapurakal, Sierra M Li, Norman E Breslow, Bruce J Beckwith, Patrick R M Thomas, Michael L Ritchey, Robert C Shamberger, Gerald M Haase, Paul E Grundy, Daniel M Green

    Abstract:

    Purpose We undertook this study to determine ( 1 ) the frequency with which spilled Tumor cells of favorable histology produced intra-Abdominal disease in patients treated with differing chemotherapy regimens and Abdominal radiation therapy (RT) and ( 2 ) the patterns of relapse and outcomes in such patients. Methods and Materials The influence of RT dose (0, 10, and 20 Gy), RT fields (flank, whole abdomen), and chemotherapy with dactinomycin and vincristine (2 drugs) vs. added doxorubicin (three drugs) on intra-Abdominal Tumor recurrence rates was analyzed by logistic regression in 450 patients. Each patient was considered at risk for two types of failure: flank and subdiaphragmatic beyond-flank recurrence, with the correlation between the two outcomes accounted for in the analyses. Results The crude odds ratio for the risk of recurrence relative to no RT was 0.35 (0.15–0.78) for 10Gy and 0.08 (0.01–0.58) for 20Gy. The odds ratio for the risk of recurrence for doxorubicin to two drugs after adjusting for RT was not significant. For Stage II patients (NWTS-4), the 8-year event rates with and without spillage, respectively, were 79% and 87% for relapse-free survival ( p = 0.07) and 90% and 95% for overall survival ( p = 0.04). Conclusions Irradiation (10 Gy or 20 Gy) reduced Abdominal Tumor recurrence rates after Tumor spillage. Tumor spillage in Stage II patients reduced relapse-free survival and overall survival, but only the latter was of statistical significance. These data provide a basis for assessing the risks vs. benefits when considering treatment for children with favorable histology Wilms Tumor and surgical spillage.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • influence of radiation therapy delay on Abdominal Tumor recurrence in patients with favorable histology wilms Tumor treated on nwts 3 and nwts 4 a report from the national wilms Tumor study group
    International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, 2003
    Co-Authors: John A Kalapurakal, Sierra M Li, Norman E Breslow, Bruce J Beckwith, Roger M Macklis, Patrick R M Thomas, G J Dangio, Alfred De Lorimier, Panayotis P Kelalis, Steven Shochat

    Abstract:

    Abstract Purpose This study was undertaken to determine whether radiation therapy (RT) delay of ≥10 days had an adverse impact on Abdominal Tumor recurrence among children with favorable histology (FH) Wilms’ Tumor enrolled in National Wilms’ Tumor Study (NWTS) 3 and 4. Methods and materials A total of 1226 patients with Stage II–IV FH Tumors who received flank or Abdominal RT in NWTS-3 and NWTS-4 were included in this analysis. Recurrent disease in the operative bed was classified as flank recurrence. Abdominal recurrence included all infradiaphragmatic Tumor recurrences, including flank recurrences. This analysis included all flank/Abdominal Tumor recurrences, regardless of whether they might have been the initial or subsequent site of relapse. Based on the NWTS-1 results, RT delay was analyzed in two categories: 0–9 days and ≥10 days. Results The mean RT delay was 10.9 days; median delay was 9 days (range: 1–277 days). The RT delay was concentrated in a relatively narrow range of 8 to 12 days after nephrectomy in the majority of patients (59%). Univariate and multivariate analysis did not reveal RT delay of ≥10 days to significantly influence flank and Abdominal Tumor recurrence rates in NWTS-3 or NWTS-4. The 8-year flank Tumor recurrence rates for 0–9 days and 10+ days RT delay were 1.9% and 1.2%, respectively ( p value=0.3). The 8-year Abdominal Tumor recurrence rates for 0–9 days and 10+ days RT delay were 4.8% and 5.3%, respectively ( p value=0.7). Conclusions RT delay of ≥10 days did not significantly influence flank or Abdominal Tumor recurrence rates among children with FH Tumors treated on NWTS-3 and NWTS-4. However, we were unable to test for a meaningful difference, because of the concentration of RT delay close to 10 days.

    Free Register to Access Article