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Abducens Nerve Paralysis

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Li Ming-hu – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Cheho Park – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Sphenoid wing dural arteriovenous fistula: A case report and literature review.
    Surgical neurology international, 2020
    Co-Authors: Yu Shimizu, Kazuhiko Tokuda, Cheho Park
    Abstract:

    Background Sphenoid wing dural arteriovenous fistfistula (SWDAVF) is rare that is typically fed by middle meningeal artery feeders and that drain through the sphenoparietal sinusinus or middle cerebral vein. Here, we report a case of SWDAVF treated by coils placed in the venous aneurysm through the contralateral cavernous sinus (CS). Case Description A 37-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with headache and bilateral oculomotor Nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance images and an angiogram showed a venous aneurysm in the right middle cranial fossa. A DAVF, consisting of two main feeders, was diagnosed based on the angiogram findings. The fistula drained into the left inferior petrosal sinusinus (IPS) through the left CS and right IPS. Given the remarkable extent of venous ectasia together with the headache and right Abducens Nerve Paralysis, endovascular treatment was initiated. A transvenous approach through the right IPS was not feasible, as it is strenuous to insert the microcatheter into the right IPS. Thus, we tried an approach through the left IPS. The venous aneurysm was embolized with coils. The postoperative course was uneventful, and postoperative cerebral angiography confirmed disappearance of the fistula. Conclusion A SWDAVF is extremely rare. In our case, since the AVF drained into the contralateral CS, contralateral ocular symptoms occurred. Endovascular occlusion of the venous aneurysm and fistula was achieved through a transvenous approach.

H. Bozkuş – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Yu Shimizu – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Sphenoid wing dural arteriovenous fistula: A case report and literature review.
    Surgical neurology international, 2020
    Co-Authors: Yu Shimizu, Kazuhiko Tokuda, Cheho Park
    Abstract:

    Background Sphenoid wing dural arteriovenous fistula (SWDAVF) is rare that is typically fed by middle meningeal artery feeders and that drain through the sphenoparietal sinus or middle cerebral vein. Here, we report a case of SWDAVF treated by coils placed in the venous aneurysm through the contralateral cavernous sinus (CS). Case Description A 37-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with headache and bilateral oculomotor Nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance images and an angiogram showed a venous aneurysm in the right middle cranial fossa. A DAVF, consisting of two main feeders, was diagnosed based on the angiogram findings. The fistula drained into the left inferior petrosal sinus (IPS) through the left CS and right IPS. Given the remarkable extent of venous ectasia together with the headache and right Abducens Nerve Paralysis, endovascular treatment was initiated. A transvenous approach through the right IPS was not feasible, as it is strenuous to insert the microcatheter into the right IPS. Thus, we tried an approach through the left IPS. The venous aneurysm was embolized with coils. The postoperative course was uneventful, and postoperative cerebral angiography confirmed disappearance of the fistula. Conclusion A SWDAVF is extremely rare. In our case, since the AVF drained into the contralateral CS, contralateral ocular symptoms occurred. Endovascular occlusion of the venous aneurysm and fistula was achieved through a transvenous approach.

Hyung-chang Lee – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Abducens Nerve palsy as a postoperative complication of minimally invasive thoracic spine surgery: a case report
    BMC Surgery, 2016
    Co-Authors: Luiz Henrique Dias Sandon, Gun Choi, Eunsoo Park, Hyung-chang Lee
    Abstract:

    Background Thoracic disc surgeries make up only a small number of all spine surgeries performed, but they can have a considerable number of postoperative complications. Numerous approaches have been developed and studied in an attempt to reduce the morbidity associated with the procedure; however, we still encounter cases that develop serious and unexpected outcomes. Case Presentation This case report presents a patient with Abducens Nerve palsy after minimally invainvasive surgery for thoracic disc herniation with an intraoperative spinal fluid fistula. A literature review of all cases related to this complication after spine surgery is included. Despite the uncommon nature of this type of complication, understanding the procedure itself, the principle occurrences and outcomes following the procedure, the physiopathogical features of Abducens Nerve palsy, and the possible adverse effects of spinal surgery, including minimally invasive procedures, can enable an early diagnosis of complications and facilitate the procedure. Conclusions In spite of being very rare and multifactorial, uni- or bilateral Abducens Nerve Paralysis carries significant morbidity and can occur as a postoperative complication after conventional or minimally invasive spine surgery. This condition requires an accurate diagnosis and adequate multidisciplinary follow up.

  • Abducens Nerve palsy as a postoperative complication of minimally invasive thoracic spine surgery: a case report
    BMC surgery, 2016
    Co-Authors: Luiz Henrique Dias Sandon, Gun Choi, Eunsoo Park, Hyung-chang Lee
    Abstract:

    Thoracic disc surgeries make up only a small number of all spine surgeries performed, but they can have a considerable number of postoperative complications. Numerous approaches have been developed and studied in an attempt to reduce the morbidity associated with the procedure; however, we still encounter cases that develop serious and unexpected outcomes. This case report presents a patient with Abducens Nerve palsy after minimally invainvasive surgery for thoracic disc herniation with an intraoperative spinal fluid fistula. A literature review of all cases related to this complication after spine surgery is included. Despite the uncommon nature of this type of complication, understanding the procedure itself, the principle occurrences and outcomes following the procedure, the physiopathogical features of Abducens Nerve palsy, and the possible adverse effects of spinal surgery, including minimally invasive procedures, can enable an early diagnosis of complications and facilitate the procedure. In spite of being very rare and multifactorial, uni- or bilateral Abducens Nerve Paralysis carries significant morbidity and can occur as a postoperative complication after conventional or minimally invasive spine surgery. This condition requires an accurate diagnosis and adequate multidisciplinary follow up.