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Catherine Boyen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Revisiting Australian Ectocarpus subulatus (Phaeophyceae) from the Hopkins River: distribution, Abiotic Environment, and associated microbiota
    Journal of Phycology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Simon M Dittami, Thierry Cariou, Hetty Kleinjan, Aurelie Prechoux, Suhelen Egan, Akira Peters, Bezhin Rosko, John West, Bertille Burgunter-delamare, Catherine Boyen

    Abstract:

    In 1995 a strain of Ectocarpus was isolated from Hopkins River Falls, Victoria, Australia, constituting one of few available freshwater or nearly freshwater brown algae, and the only one belonging to the genus Ectocarpus. It has since been used as a model to study acclimation and adaptation to low salinities and the role of its microbiota in these processes. To provide more background information on this model, we assessed if Ectocarpus was still present in the Hopkins river twenty-two years after the original finding, estimated its present distribution, described its Abiotic Environment, and determined its in situ microbial composition. We sampled for Ectocarpus at 15 sites along the Hopkins River as well as 10 neighboring sites and found individuals with ITS and cox1 sequences identical to the original isolate at three sites upstream of Hopkins River Falls. The salinity of the water at these sites ranged from 3.1-6.9 psu, and it was rich in sulfate (1-5 mM). The diversity of bacteria associated with the algae in situ (1312 operational taxonomic units) was one order of magnitude higher than in previous studies of the original laboratory culture, and 95 alga-associated bacterial strains were isolated from algal filaments on site. In particular, species of Planctomycetes were abundant in situ but rare in laboratory-cultures. Our results confirmed that Ectocarpus was still present in the Hopkins River, and the newly isolated algal and bacterial strains offer new possibilities to study the adaptation of Ectocarpus to low salinity and its interactions with its microbiome.

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  • revisiting australian ectocarpus subulatus phaeophyceae from the hopkins river distribution Abiotic Environment and associated microbiota
    Journal of Phycology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Simon M Dittami, Akira F. Peters, John A West, Thierry Cariou, Hetty Kleinjan, Bertille Burgunterdelamare, Aurelie Prechoux, Suhelen Egan, Catherine Boyen

    Abstract:

    : In 1995 a strain of Ectocarpus was isolated from Hopkins River Falls, Victoria, Australia, constituting one of few available freshwater or nearly freshwater brown algae, and the only one belonging to the genus Ectocarpus. It has since been used as a model to study acclimation and adaptation to low salinities and the role of its microbiota in these processes. To provide more background information on this model, we assessed if Ectocarpus was still present in the Hopkins river 22 years after the original finding, estimated its present distribution, described its Abiotic Environment, and determined its in situ microbial composition. We sampled for Ectocarpus at 15 sites along the Hopkins River as well as 10 neighboring sites and found individuals with ITS and cox1 sequences identical to the original isolate at three sites upstream of Hopkins River Falls. The salinity of the water at these sites ranged from 3.1 to 6.9, and it was rich in sulfate (1-5 mM). The diversity of bacteria associated with the algae in situ (1312 operational taxonomic units) was one order of magnitude higher than in previous studies of the original laboratory culture, and 95 alga-associated bacterial strains were isolated from algal filaments on site. In particular, species of Planctomycetes were abundant in situ but rare in laboratory cultures. Our results confirmed that Ectocarpus was still present in the Hopkins River, and the newly isolated algal and bacterial strains offer new possibilities to study the adaptation of Ectocarpus to low salinity and its interactions with its microbiome.

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  • revisiting australian ectocarpus subulatus phaeophyceae from the hopkins river distribution Abiotic Environment and associated microbiota
    bioRxiv, 2019
    Co-Authors: Simon M Dittami, Akira F. Peters, John A West, Thierry Cariou, Hetty Kleinjan, Bertille Burgunterdelamare, Aurelie Prechoux, Suhelen Egan, Catherine Boyen

    Abstract:

    Ectocarpus is a genus of common marine brown algae. In 1995 a strain of Ectocarpus was isolated from Hopkins River Falls, Victoria, Australia, constituting one of few available freshwater or nearly freshwater brown algae, and the only one belonging to Ectocarpus. It has since been used as a model to study acclimation and adaptation to low salinities and the role of its microbiota in these processes. However, little is known about the distribution of this strain or whether it represents a stable population. Furthermore, its microbiota may have been impacted by the long period of cultivation. Twenty-two years after the original finding we searched for Ectocarpus in the Hopkins River and surrounding areas. We found individuals with ITS and cox1 sequences identical to the original isolate at three sites upstream of Hopkins River Falls, but none at the original isolation site. The osmolarity of the water at these sites ranged from 74-170 mOsmol, and it was rich in sulfate. The diversity of bacteria associated with the algae in situ was approximately one order of magnitude higher than in previous studies of the original laboratory culture, and 95 alga-associated bacterial strains were isolated from E. subulatus filaments on site. In particular, Planctomycetes were abundant in situ but rare in the laboratory-cultured strain. Our results confirm that E. subulatus has stably colonized the Hopkins River, and the newly isolated algal and bacterial strains offer new possibilities to study the adaptation of Ectocarpus to low salinity and its interactions with its microbiome.

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Simon M Dittami – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Revisiting Australian Ectocarpus subulatus (Phaeophyceae) from the Hopkins River: distribution, Abiotic Environment, and associated microbiota
    Journal of Phycology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Simon M Dittami, Thierry Cariou, Hetty Kleinjan, Aurelie Prechoux, Suhelen Egan, Akira Peters, Bezhin Rosko, John West, Bertille Burgunter-delamare, Catherine Boyen

    Abstract:

    In 1995 a strain of Ectocarpus was isolated from Hopkins River Falls, Victoria, Australia, constituting one of few available freshwater or nearly freshwater brown algae, and the only one belonging to the genus Ectocarpus. It has since been used as a model to study acclimation and adaptation to low salinities and the role of its microbiota in these processes. To provide more background information on this model, we assessed if Ectocarpus was still present in the Hopkins river twenty-two years after the original finding, estimated its present distribution, described its Abiotic Environment, and determined its in situ microbial composition. We sampled for Ectocarpus at 15 sites along the Hopkins River as well as 10 neighboring sites and found individuals with ITS and cox1 sequences identical to the original isolate at three sites upstream of Hopkins River Falls. The salinity of the water at these sites ranged from 3.1-6.9 psu, and it was rich in sulfate (1-5 mM). The diversity of bacteria associated with the algae in situ (1312 operational taxonomic units) was one order of magnitude higher than in previous studies of the original laboratory culture, and 95 alga-associated bacterial strains were isolated from algal filaments on site. In particular, species of Planctomycetes were abundant in situ but rare in laboratory-cultures. Our results confirmed that Ectocarpus was still present in the Hopkins River, and the newly isolated algal and bacterial strains offer new possibilities to study the adaptation of Ectocarpus to low salinity and its interactions with its microbiome.

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  • revisiting australian ectocarpus subulatus phaeophyceae from the hopkins river distribution Abiotic Environment and associated microbiota
    Journal of Phycology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Simon M Dittami, Akira F. Peters, John A West, Thierry Cariou, Hetty Kleinjan, Bertille Burgunterdelamare, Aurelie Prechoux, Suhelen Egan, Catherine Boyen

    Abstract:

    : In 1995 a strain of Ectocarpus was isolated from Hopkins River Falls, Victoria, Australia, constituting one of few available freshwater or nearly freshwater brown algae, and the only one belonging to the genus Ectocarpus. It has since been used as a model to study acclimation and adaptation to low salinities and the role of its microbiota in these processes. To provide more background information on this model, we assessed if Ectocarpus was still present in the Hopkins river 22 years after the original finding, estimated its present distribution, described its Abiotic Environment, and determined its in situ microbial composition. We sampled for Ectocarpus at 15 sites along the Hopkins River as well as 10 neighboring sites and found individuals with ITS and cox1 sequences identical to the original isolate at three sites upstream of Hopkins River Falls. The salinity of the water at these sites ranged from 3.1 to 6.9, and it was rich in sulfate (1-5 mM). The diversity of bacteria associated with the algae in situ (1312 operational taxonomic units) was one order of magnitude higher than in previous studies of the original laboratory culture, and 95 alga-associated bacterial strains were isolated from algal filaments on site. In particular, species of Planctomycetes were abundant in situ but rare in laboratory cultures. Our results confirmed that Ectocarpus was still present in the Hopkins River, and the newly isolated algal and bacterial strains offer new possibilities to study the adaptation of Ectocarpus to low salinity and its interactions with its microbiome.

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  • revisiting australian ectocarpus subulatus phaeophyceae from the hopkins river distribution Abiotic Environment and associated microbiota
    bioRxiv, 2019
    Co-Authors: Simon M Dittami, Akira F. Peters, John A West, Thierry Cariou, Hetty Kleinjan, Bertille Burgunterdelamare, Aurelie Prechoux, Suhelen Egan, Catherine Boyen

    Abstract:

    Ectocarpus is a genus of common marine brown algae. In 1995 a strain of Ectocarpus was isolated from Hopkins River Falls, Victoria, Australia, constituting one of few available freshwater or nearly freshwater brown algae, and the only one belonging to Ectocarpus. It has since been used as a model to study acclimation and adaptation to low salinities and the role of its microbiota in these processes. However, little is known about the distribution of this strain or whether it represents a stable population. Furthermore, its microbiota may have been impacted by the long period of cultivation. Twenty-two years after the original finding we searched for Ectocarpus in the Hopkins River and surrounding areas. We found individuals with ITS and cox1 sequences identical to the original isolate at three sites upstream of Hopkins River Falls, but none at the original isolation site. The osmolarity of the water at these sites ranged from 74-170 mOsmol, and it was rich in sulfate. The diversity of bacteria associated with the algae in situ was approximately one order of magnitude higher than in previous studies of the original laboratory culture, and 95 alga-associated bacterial strains were isolated from E. subulatus filaments on site. In particular, Planctomycetes were abundant in situ but rare in the laboratory-cultured strain. Our results confirm that E. subulatus has stably colonized the Hopkins River, and the newly isolated algal and bacterial strains offer new possibilities to study the adaptation of Ectocarpus to low salinity and its interactions with its microbiome.

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Suhelen Egan – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Revisiting Australian Ectocarpus subulatus (Phaeophyceae) from the Hopkins River: distribution, Abiotic Environment, and associated microbiota
    Journal of Phycology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Simon M Dittami, Thierry Cariou, Hetty Kleinjan, Aurelie Prechoux, Suhelen Egan, Akira Peters, Bezhin Rosko, John West, Bertille Burgunter-delamare, Catherine Boyen

    Abstract:

    In 1995 a strain of Ectocarpus was isolated from Hopkins River Falls, Victoria, Australia, constituting one of few available freshwater or nearly freshwater brown algae, and the only one belonging to the genus Ectocarpus. It has since been used as a model to study acclimation and adaptation to low salinities and the role of its microbiota in these processes. To provide more background information on this model, we assessed if Ectocarpus was still present in the Hopkins river twenty-two years after the original finding, estimated its present distribution, described its Abiotic Environment, and determined its in situ microbial composition. We sampled for Ectocarpus at 15 sites along the Hopkins River as well as 10 neighboring sites and found individuals with ITS and cox1 sequences identical to the original isolate at three sites upstream of Hopkins River Falls. The salinity of the water at these sites ranged from 3.1-6.9 psu, and it was rich in sulfate (1-5 mM). The diversity of bacteria associated with the algae in situ (1312 operational taxonomic units) was one order of magnitude higher than in previous studies of the original laboratory culture, and 95 alga-associated bacterial strains were isolated from algal filaments on site. In particular, species of Planctomycetes were abundant in situ but rare in laboratory-cultures. Our results confirmed that Ectocarpus was still present in the Hopkins River, and the newly isolated algal and bacterial strains offer new possibilities to study the adaptation of Ectocarpus to low salinity and its interactions with its microbiome.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • revisiting australian ectocarpus subulatus phaeophyceae from the hopkins river distribution Abiotic Environment and associated microbiota
    Journal of Phycology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Simon M Dittami, Akira F. Peters, John A West, Thierry Cariou, Hetty Kleinjan, Bertille Burgunterdelamare, Aurelie Prechoux, Suhelen Egan, Catherine Boyen

    Abstract:

    : In 1995 a strain of Ectocarpus was isolated from Hopkins River Falls, Victoria, Australia, constituting one of few available freshwater or nearly freshwater brown algae, and the only one belonging to the genus Ectocarpus. It has since been used as a model to study acclimation and adaptation to low salinities and the role of its microbiota in these processes. To provide more background information on this model, we assessed if Ectocarpus was still present in the Hopkins river 22 years after the original finding, estimated its present distribution, described its Abiotic Environment, and determined its in situ microbial composition. We sampled for Ectocarpus at 15 sites along the Hopkins River as well as 10 neighboring sites and found individuals with ITS and cox1 sequences identical to the original isolate at three sites upstream of Hopkins River Falls. The salinity of the water at these sites ranged from 3.1 to 6.9, and it was rich in sulfate (1-5 mM). The diversity of bacteria associated with the algae in situ (1312 operational taxonomic units) was one order of magnitude higher than in previous studies of the original laboratory culture, and 95 alga-associated bacterial strains were isolated from algal filaments on site. In particular, species of Planctomycetes were abundant in situ but rare in laboratory cultures. Our results confirmed that Ectocarpus was still present in the Hopkins River, and the newly isolated algal and bacterial strains offer new possibilities to study the adaptation of Ectocarpus to low salinity and its interactions with its microbiome.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • revisiting australian ectocarpus subulatus phaeophyceae from the hopkins river distribution Abiotic Environment and associated microbiota
    bioRxiv, 2019
    Co-Authors: Simon M Dittami, Akira F. Peters, John A West, Thierry Cariou, Hetty Kleinjan, Bertille Burgunterdelamare, Aurelie Prechoux, Suhelen Egan, Catherine Boyen

    Abstract:

    Ectocarpus is a genus of common marine brown algae. In 1995 a strain of Ectocarpus was isolated from Hopkins River Falls, Victoria, Australia, constituting one of few available freshwater or nearly freshwater brown algae, and the only one belonging to Ectocarpus. It has since been used as a model to study acclimation and adaptation to low salinities and the role of its microbiota in these processes. However, little is known about the distribution of this strain or whether it represents a stable population. Furthermore, its microbiota may have been impacted by the long period of cultivation. Twenty-two years after the original finding we searched for Ectocarpus in the Hopkins River and surrounding areas. We found individuals with ITS and cox1 sequences identical to the original isolate at three sites upstream of Hopkins River Falls, but none at the original isolation site. The osmolarity of the water at these sites ranged from 74-170 mOsmol, and it was rich in sulfate. The diversity of bacteria associated with the algae in situ was approximately one order of magnitude higher than in previous studies of the original laboratory culture, and 95 alga-associated bacterial strains were isolated from E. subulatus filaments on site. In particular, Planctomycetes were abundant in situ but rare in the laboratory-cultured strain. Our results confirm that E. subulatus has stably colonized the Hopkins River, and the newly isolated algal and bacterial strains offer new possibilities to study the adaptation of Ectocarpus to low salinity and its interactions with its microbiome.

    Free Register to Access Article