Aboriginal Population - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Aboriginal Population

The Experts below are selected from a list of 312 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Aboriginal Population – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Christopher E. Lalonde – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Hospitalizations due to unintentional transport injuries among Aboriginal Population of British Columbia, Canada: Incidence, changes over time and ecological analysis of risk markers.
    PloS one, 2018
    Co-Authors: Mariana Brussoni, M. Anne George, Andrew Jin, Ofer Amram, Rod Mccormick, Christopher E. Lalonde
    Abstract:

    Background Worldwide, Indigenous people have disproportionately higher rates of transport injuries. We examined disparities in injury-related hospitalizations resulting from transport incidents for three Population groups in British Columbia (BC): total Population, Aboriginal off-reserve, and Aboriginal on-reserve Populations. We also examined sociodemographic, geographic and ethnic risk markers for disparities. Methods We identified Aboriginal people through BC’s universal health care insurance plan insurance premium group and birth and death record notations. We calculated crude incidence rate and Standardized Relative Risk (SRR) of hospitalization for unintentional transport injury, standardized for age, gender and Health Service Delivery Area (HSDA), relative to the total Population of BC. We tested hypothesized associations of geographic, socio-economic, and employment-related characteristics of Aboriginal communities with SRR of transport injury by multivariable linear regression. Results During the period 1991–2010, the SRR for the off-reserve Aboriginal Population was 1.77 (95% CI: 1.71 to 1.83); and 2.00 (95% CI: 1.93 to 2.07) among those living on-reserve. Decline in crude rate and SRRs was observed over this period among both the Aboriginal and total Populations of BC, but was proportionally greater among the Aboriginal Population. The best-fitting multivariable risk marker model was an excellent fit (R2 = 0.912, p

  • hospitalizations due to unintentional transport injuries among Aboriginal Population of british columbia canada incidence changes over time and ecological analysis of risk markers
    PLOS ONE, 2018
    Co-Authors: Mariana Brussoni, Andrew Jin, Ofer Amram, Rod Mccormick, Anne M George, Christopher E. Lalonde
    Abstract:

    Background Worldwide, Indigenous people have disproportionately higher rates of transport injuries. We examined disparities in injury-related hospitalizations resulting from transport incidents for three Population groups in British Columbia (BC): total Population, Aboriginal off-reserve, and Aboriginal on-reserve Populations. We also examined sociodemographic, geographic and ethnic risk markers for disparities. Methods We identified Aboriginal people through BC’s universal health care insurance plan insurance premium group and birth and death record notations. We calculated crude incidence rate and Standardized Relative Risk (SRR) of hospitalization for unintentional transport injury, standardized for age, gender and Health Service Delivery Area (HSDA), relative to the total Population of BC. We tested hypothesized associations of geographic, socio-economic, and employment-related characteristics of Aboriginal communities with SRR of transport injury by multivariable linear regression. Results During the period 1991–2010, the SRR for the off-reserve Aboriginal Population was 1.77 (95% CI: 1.71 to 1.83); and 2.00 (95% CI: 1.93 to 2.07) among those living on-reserve. Decline in crude rate and SRRs was observed over this period among both the Aboriginal and total Populations of BC, but was proportionally greater among the Aboriginal Population. The best-fitting multivariable risk marker model was an excellent fit (R2 = 0.912, p<0.001), predicted SRRs very close to observed values, and retained the following terms: urban residence, Population per room, proportion of the Population with a high school certificate, proportion of the Population employed; and multiplicative interactions of Aboriginal ethnicity with Population per room and proportion of the Population employed. Conclusions Disparities in risk of hospitalization due to unintentional transport injury have narrowed. Aboriginal ethnicity modifies the effects of socioeconomic risk factors. Continued improvement of socioeconomic conditions and implementation of culturally relevant injury prevention interventions are needed.

  • injury hospitalizations due to unintentional falls among the Aboriginal Population of british columbia canada incidence changes over time and ecological analysis of risk markers 1991 2010
    PLOS ONE, 2015
    Co-Authors: Andrew Jin, Mariana Brussoni, Christopher E. Lalonde, Rod Mccormick, Anne M George
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: Aboriginal people in British Columbia (BC) have higher injury incidence than the general Population. Our project describes variability among injury categories, time periods, and geographic, demographic and socio-economic groups. This report focuses on unintentional falls. METHODS: We used BC’s universal health care insurance plan as a Population registry, linked to hospital separation and vital statistics databases. We identified Aboriginal people by insurance premium group and birth and death record notations. We identified residents of specific Aboriginal communities by postal code. We calculated crude incidence and Standardized Relative Risk (SRR) of hospitalization for unintentional fall injury, standardized for age, gender and Health Service Delivery Area (HSDA), relative to the total Population of BC. We tested hypothesized associations of geographic, socio-economic, and employment-related characteristics with community SRR of injury by linear regression. RESULTS: During 1991 through 2010, the crude rate of hospitalization for unintentional fall injury in BC was 33.6 per 10,000 person-years. The Aboriginal rate was 49.9 per 10,000 and SRR was 1.89 (95% confidence interval 1.85-1.94). Among those living on reserves SRR was 2.00 (95% CI 1.93-2.07). Northern and non-urban HSDAs had higher SRRs, within both total and Aboriginal Populations. In every age and gender category, the HSDA-standardized SRR was higher among the Aboriginal than among the total Population. Between 1991 and 2010, crude rates and SRRs declined substantially, but proportionally more among the Aboriginal Population, so the gap between the Aboriginal and total Population is narrowing, particularly among females and older adults. These community characteristics were associated with higher risk: lower income, lower educational level, worse housing conditions, and more hazardous types of employment. CONCLUSIONS: Over the years, as socio-economic conditions improve, risk of hospitalization due to unintentional fall injury has declined among the Aboriginal Population. Women and older adults have benefited more. Language: en

Mariana Brussoni – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Hospitalizations due to unintentional transport injuries among Aboriginal Population of British Columbia, Canada: Incidence, changes over time and ecological analysis of risk markers.
    PloS one, 2018
    Co-Authors: Mariana Brussoni, M. Anne George, Andrew Jin, Ofer Amram, Rod Mccormick, Christopher E. Lalonde
    Abstract:

    Background Worldwide, Indigenous people have disproportionately higher rates of transport injuries. We examined disparities in injury-related hospitalizations resulting from transport incidents for three Population groups in British Columbia (BC): total Population, Aboriginal off-reserve, and Aboriginal on-reserve Populations. We also examined sociodemographic, geographic and ethnic risk markers for disparities. Methods We identified Aboriginal people through BC’s universal health care insurance plan insurance premium group and birth and death record notations. We calculated crude incidence rate and Standardized Relative Risk (SRR) of hospitalization for unintentional transport injury, standardized for age, gender and Health Service Delivery Area (HSDA), relative to the total Population of BC. We tested hypothesized associations of geographic, socio-economic, and employment-related characteristics of Aboriginal communities with SRR of transport injury by multivariable linear regression. Results During the period 1991–2010, the SRR for the off-reserve Aboriginal Population was 1.77 (95% CI: 1.71 to 1.83); and 2.00 (95% CI: 1.93 to 2.07) among those living on-reserve. Decline in crude rate and SRRs was observed over this period among both the Aboriginal and total Populations of BC, but was proportionally greater among the Aboriginal Population. The best-fitting multivariable risk marker model was an excellent fit (R2 = 0.912, p

  • hospitalizations due to unintentional transport injuries among Aboriginal Population of british columbia canada incidence changes over time and ecological analysis of risk markers
    PLOS ONE, 2018
    Co-Authors: Mariana Brussoni, Andrew Jin, Ofer Amram, Rod Mccormick, Anne M George, Christopher E. Lalonde
    Abstract:

    Background Worldwide, Indigenous people have disproportionately higher rates of transport injuries. We examined disparities in injury-related hospitalizations resulting from transport incidents for three Population groups in British Columbia (BC): total Population, Aboriginal off-reserve, and Aboriginal on-reserve Populations. We also examined sociodemographic, geographic and ethnic risk markers for disparities. Methods We identified Aboriginal people through BC’s universal health care insurance plan insurance premium group and birth and death record notations. We calculated crude incidence rate and Standardized Relative Risk (SRR) of hospitalization for unintentional transport injury, standardized for age, gender and Health Service Delivery Area (HSDA), relative to the total Population of BC. We tested hypothesized associations of geographic, socio-economic, and employment-related characteristics of Aboriginal communities with SRR of transport injury by multivariable linear regression. Results During the period 1991–2010, the SRR for the off-reserve Aboriginal Population was 1.77 (95% CI: 1.71 to 1.83); and 2.00 (95% CI: 1.93 to 2.07) among those living on-reserve. Decline in crude rate and SRRs was observed over this period among both the Aboriginal and total Populations of BC, but was proportionally greater among the Aboriginal Population. The best-fitting multivariable risk marker model was an excellent fit (R2 = 0.912, p<0.001), predicted SRRs very close to observed values, and retained the following terms: urban residence, Population per room, proportion of the Population with a high school certificate, proportion of the Population employed; and multiplicative interactions of Aboriginal ethnicity with Population per room and proportion of the Population employed. Conclusions Disparities in risk of hospitalization due to unintentional transport injury have narrowed. Aboriginal ethnicity modifies the effects of socioeconomic risk factors. Continued improvement of socioeconomic conditions and implementation of culturally relevant injury prevention interventions are needed.

  • injury hospitalizations due to unintentional falls among the Aboriginal Population of british columbia canada incidence changes over time and ecological analysis of risk markers 1991 2010
    PLOS ONE, 2015
    Co-Authors: Andrew Jin, Mariana Brussoni, Christopher E. Lalonde, Rod Mccormick, Anne M George
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: Aboriginal people in British Columbia (BC) have higher injury incidence than the general Population. Our project describes variability among injury categories, time periods, and geographic, demographic and socio-economic groups. This report focuses on unintentional falls. METHODS: We used BC’s universal health care insurance plan as a Population registry, linked to hospital separation and vital statistics databases. We identified Aboriginal people by insurance premium group and birth and death record notations. We identified residents of specific Aboriginal communities by postal code. We calculated crude incidence and Standardized Relative Risk (SRR) of hospitalization for unintentional fall injury, standardized for age, gender and Health Service Delivery Area (HSDA), relative to the total Population of BC. We tested hypothesized associations of geographic, socio-economic, and employment-related characteristics with community SRR of injury by linear regression. RESULTS: During 1991 through 2010, the crude rate of hospitalization for unintentional fall injury in BC was 33.6 per 10,000 person-years. The Aboriginal rate was 49.9 per 10,000 and SRR was 1.89 (95% confidence interval 1.85-1.94). Among those living on reserves SRR was 2.00 (95% CI 1.93-2.07). Northern and non-urban HSDAs had higher SRRs, within both total and Aboriginal Populations. In every age and gender category, the HSDA-standardized SRR was higher among the Aboriginal than among the total Population. Between 1991 and 2010, crude rates and SRRs declined substantially, but proportionally more among the Aboriginal Population, so the gap between the Aboriginal and total Population is narrowing, particularly among females and older adults. These community characteristics were associated with higher risk: lower income, lower educational level, worse housing conditions, and more hazardous types of employment. CONCLUSIONS: Over the years, as socio-economic conditions improve, risk of hospitalization due to unintentional fall injury has declined among the Aboriginal Population. Women and older adults have benefited more. Language: en

Andrew Jin – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Hospitalizations due to unintentional transport injuries among Aboriginal Population of British Columbia, Canada: Incidence, changes over time and ecological analysis of risk markers.
    PloS one, 2018
    Co-Authors: Mariana Brussoni, M. Anne George, Andrew Jin, Ofer Amram, Rod Mccormick, Christopher E. Lalonde
    Abstract:

    Background Worldwide, Indigenous people have disproportionately higher rates of transport injuries. We examined disparities in injury-related hospitalizations resulting from transport incidents for three Population groups in British Columbia (BC): total Population, Aboriginal off-reserve, and Aboriginal on-reserve Populations. We also examined sociodemographic, geographic and ethnic risk markers for disparities. Methods We identified Aboriginal people through BC’s universal health care insurance plan insurance premium group and birth and death record notations. We calculated crude incidence rate and Standardized Relative Risk (SRR) of hospitalization for unintentional transport injury, standardized for age, gender and Health Service Delivery Area (HSDA), relative to the total Population of BC. We tested hypothesized associations of geographic, socio-economic, and employment-related characteristics of Aboriginal communities with SRR of transport injury by multivariable linear regression. Results During the period 1991–2010, the SRR for the off-reserve Aboriginal Population was 1.77 (95% CI: 1.71 to 1.83); and 2.00 (95% CI: 1.93 to 2.07) among those living on-reserve. Decline in crude rate and SRRs was observed over this period among both the Aboriginal and total Populations of BC, but was proportionally greater among the Aboriginal Population. The best-fitting multivariable risk marker model was an excellent fit (R2 = 0.912, p

  • hospitalizations due to unintentional transport injuries among Aboriginal Population of british columbia canada incidence changes over time and ecological analysis of risk markers
    PLOS ONE, 2018
    Co-Authors: Mariana Brussoni, Andrew Jin, Ofer Amram, Rod Mccormick, Anne M George, Christopher E. Lalonde
    Abstract:

    Background Worldwide, Indigenous people have disproportionately higher rates of transport injuries. We examined disparities in injury-related hospitalizations resulting from transport incidents for three Population groups in British Columbia (BC): total Population, Aboriginal off-reserve, and Aboriginal on-reserve Populations. We also examined sociodemographic, geographic and ethnic risk markers for disparities. Methods We identified Aboriginal people through BC’s universal health care insurance plan insurance premium group and birth and death record notations. We calculated crude incidence rate and Standardized Relative Risk (SRR) of hospitalization for unintentional transport injury, standardized for age, gender and Health Service Delivery Area (HSDA), relative to the total Population of BC. We tested hypothesized associations of geographic, socio-economic, and employment-related characteristics of Aboriginal communities with SRR of transport injury by multivariable linear regression. Results During the period 1991–2010, the SRR for the off-reserve Aboriginal Population was 1.77 (95% CI: 1.71 to 1.83); and 2.00 (95% CI: 1.93 to 2.07) among those living on-reserve. Decline in crude rate and SRRs was observed over this period among both the Aboriginal and total Populations of BC, but was proportionally greater among the Aboriginal Population. The best-fitting multivariable risk marker model was an excellent fit (R2 = 0.912, p<0.001), predicted SRRs very close to observed values, and retained the following terms: urban residence, Population per room, proportion of the Population with a high school certificate, proportion of the Population employed; and multiplicative interactions of Aboriginal ethnicity with Population per room and proportion of the Population employed. Conclusions Disparities in risk of hospitalization due to unintentional transport injury have narrowed. Aboriginal ethnicity modifies the effects of socioeconomic risk factors. Continued improvement of socioeconomic conditions and implementation of culturally relevant injury prevention interventions are needed.

  • injury hospitalizations due to unintentional falls among the Aboriginal Population of british columbia canada incidence changes over time and ecological analysis of risk markers 1991 2010
    PLOS ONE, 2015
    Co-Authors: Andrew Jin, Mariana Brussoni, Christopher E. Lalonde, Rod Mccormick, Anne M George
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: Aboriginal people in British Columbia (BC) have higher injury incidence than the general Population. Our project describes variability among injury categories, time periods, and geographic, demographic and socio-economic groups. This report focuses on unintentional falls. METHODS: We used BC’s universal health care insurance plan as a Population registry, linked to hospital separation and vital statistics databases. We identified Aboriginal people by insurance premium group and birth and death record notations. We identified residents of specific Aboriginal communities by postal code. We calculated crude incidence and Standardized Relative Risk (SRR) of hospitalization for unintentional fall injury, standardized for age, gender and Health Service Delivery Area (HSDA), relative to the total Population of BC. We tested hypothesized associations of geographic, socio-economic, and employment-related characteristics with community SRR of injury by linear regression. RESULTS: During 1991 through 2010, the crude rate of hospitalization for unintentional fall injury in BC was 33.6 per 10,000 person-years. The Aboriginal rate was 49.9 per 10,000 and SRR was 1.89 (95% confidence interval 1.85-1.94). Among those living on reserves SRR was 2.00 (95% CI 1.93-2.07). Northern and non-urban HSDAs had higher SRRs, within both total and Aboriginal Populations. In every age and gender category, the HSDA-standardized SRR was higher among the Aboriginal than among the total Population. Between 1991 and 2010, crude rates and SRRs declined substantially, but proportionally more among the Aboriginal Population, so the gap between the Aboriginal and total Population is narrowing, particularly among females and older adults. These community characteristics were associated with higher risk: lower income, lower educational level, worse housing conditions, and more hazardous types of employment. CONCLUSIONS: Over the years, as socio-economic conditions improve, risk of hospitalization due to unintentional fall injury has declined among the Aboriginal Population. Women and older adults have benefited more. Language: en

Ravi Retnakaran – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Rod Mccormick – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Hospitalizations due to unintentional transport injuries among Aboriginal Population of British Columbia, Canada: Incidence, changes over time and ecological analysis of risk markers.
    PloS one, 2018
    Co-Authors: Mariana Brussoni, M. Anne George, Andrew Jin, Ofer Amram, Rod Mccormick, Christopher E. Lalonde
    Abstract:

    Background Worldwide, Indigenous people have disproportionately higher rates of transport injuries. We examined disparities in injury-related hospitalizations resulting from transport incidents for three Population groups in British Columbia (BC): total Population, Aboriginal off-reserve, and Aboriginal on-reserve Populations. We also examined sociodemographic, geographic and ethnic risk markers for disparities. Methods We identified Aboriginal people through BC’s universal health care insurance plan insurance premium group and birth and death record notations. We calculated crude incidence rate and Standardized Relative Risk (SRR) of hospitalization for unintentional transport injury, standardized for age, gender and Health Service Delivery Area (HSDA), relative to the total Population of BC. We tested hypothesized associations of geographic, socio-economic, and employment-related characteristics of Aboriginal communities with SRR of transport injury by multivariable linear regression. Results During the period 1991–2010, the SRR for the off-reserve Aboriginal Population was 1.77 (95% CI: 1.71 to 1.83); and 2.00 (95% CI: 1.93 to 2.07) among those living on-reserve. Decline in crude rate and SRRs was observed over this period among both the Aboriginal and total Populations of BC, but was proportionally greater among the Aboriginal Population. The best-fitting multivariable risk marker model was an excellent fit (R2 = 0.912, p

  • hospitalizations due to unintentional transport injuries among Aboriginal Population of british columbia canada incidence changes over time and ecological analysis of risk markers
    PLOS ONE, 2018
    Co-Authors: Mariana Brussoni, Andrew Jin, Ofer Amram, Rod Mccormick, Anne M George, Christopher E. Lalonde
    Abstract:

    Background Worldwide, Indigenous people have disproportionately higher rates of transport injuries. We examined disparities in injury-related hospitalizations resulting from transport incidents for three Population groups in British Columbia (BC): total Population, Aboriginal off-reserve, and Aboriginal on-reserve Populations. We also examined sociodemographic, geographic and ethnic risk markers for disparities. Methods We identified Aboriginal people through BC’s universal health care insurance plan insurance premium group and birth and death record notations. We calculated crude incidence rate and Standardized Relative Risk (SRR) of hospitalization for unintentional transport injury, standardized for age, gender and Health Service Delivery Area (HSDA), relative to the total Population of BC. We tested hypothesized associations of geographic, socio-economic, and employment-related characteristics of Aboriginal communities with SRR of transport injury by multivariable linear regression. Results During the period 1991–2010, the SRR for the off-reserve Aboriginal Population was 1.77 (95% CI: 1.71 to 1.83); and 2.00 (95% CI: 1.93 to 2.07) among those living on-reserve. Decline in crude rate and SRRs was observed over this period among both the Aboriginal and total Populations of BC, but was proportionally greater among the Aboriginal Population. The best-fitting multivariable risk marker model was an excellent fit (R2 = 0.912, p<0.001), predicted SRRs very close to observed values, and retained the following terms: urban residence, Population per room, proportion of the Population with a high school certificate, proportion of the Population employed; and multiplicative interactions of Aboriginal ethnicity with Population per room and proportion of the Population employed. Conclusions Disparities in risk of hospitalization due to unintentional transport injury have narrowed. Aboriginal ethnicity modifies the effects of socioeconomic risk factors. Continued improvement of socioeconomic conditions and implementation of culturally relevant injury prevention interventions are needed.

  • injury hospitalizations due to unintentional falls among the Aboriginal Population of british columbia canada incidence changes over time and ecological analysis of risk markers 1991 2010
    PLOS ONE, 2015
    Co-Authors: Andrew Jin, Mariana Brussoni, Christopher E. Lalonde, Rod Mccormick, Anne M George
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: Aboriginal people in British Columbia (BC) have higher injury incidence than the general Population. Our project describes variability among injury categories, time periods, and geographic, demographic and socio-economic groups. This report focuses on unintentional falls. METHODS: We used BC’s universal health care insurance plan as a Population registry, linked to hospital separation and vital statistics databases. We identified Aboriginal people by insurance premium group and birth and death record notations. We identified residents of specific Aboriginal communities by postal code. We calculated crude incidence and Standardized Relative Risk (SRR) of hospitalization for unintentional fall injury, standardized for age, gender and Health Service Delivery Area (HSDA), relative to the total Population of BC. We tested hypothesized associations of geographic, socio-economic, and employment-related characteristics with community SRR of injury by linear regression. RESULTS: During 1991 through 2010, the crude rate of hospitalization for unintentional fall injury in BC was 33.6 per 10,000 person-years. The Aboriginal rate was 49.9 per 10,000 and SRR was 1.89 (95% confidence interval 1.85-1.94). Among those living on reserves SRR was 2.00 (95% CI 1.93-2.07). Northern and non-urban HSDAs had higher SRRs, within both total and Aboriginal Populations. In every age and gender category, the HSDA-standardized SRR was higher among the Aboriginal than among the total Population. Between 1991 and 2010, crude rates and SRRs declined substantially, but proportionally more among the Aboriginal Population, so the gap between the Aboriginal and total Population is narrowing, particularly among females and older adults. These community characteristics were associated with higher risk: lower income, lower educational level, worse housing conditions, and more hazardous types of employment. CONCLUSIONS: Over the years, as socio-economic conditions improve, risk of hospitalization due to unintentional fall injury has declined among the Aboriginal Population. Women and older adults have benefited more. Language: en