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Johan Jendle – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Costs of diabetes complications: hospital-based care and Absence from Work for 392,200 people with type 2 diabetes and matched control participants in Sweden
    Diabetologia, 2020
    Co-Authors: Emelie Andersson, Sofie Persson, Nino Hallén, Åsa Ericsson, Desirée Thielke, Peter Lindgren, Katarina Steen Carlsson, Johan Jendle
    Abstract:

    Aims/hypothesis The risk of complications and medical consequences of type 2 diabetes are well known. Hospital costs have been identified as a key driver of total costs in studies of the economic burden of type 2 diabetes. Less evidence has been generated on the impact of individual diabetic complications on the overall societal burden. The objective of this study was to analyse costs of hospital-based healthcare (inpatient and outpatient care) and Work Absence related to individual macrovascular and microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes in Sweden in 2016. Methods Data for 2016 were retrieved from a Swedish national retrospective observational database cross-linking individual-level data for 1997–2016. The database contained information from population-based health, social insurance and socioeconomic registers for 392,200 people with type 2 diabetes and matched control participants (5:1). Presence of type 2 diabetes and of diabetes complications were derived using all years, 1997–2016. Costs of hospital-based care and of Absence from Work due to diabetes complications were estimated for the year 2016. Regression analysis was used for comparison with control participants to attribute Absence from Work to individual complications, and to account for joint presence of complications. Results Use of hospital care for complications was higher in type 2 diabetes compared with control participants in 2016: 26% vs 12% had ≥1 hospital contact; there were 86,104 vs 24,608 outpatient visits per 100,000 people; and there were 9894 vs 2546 inpatient admissions per 100,000 people (all p  

  • Costs of diabetes complications: hospital-based care and Absence from Work for 392,200 people with type 2 diabetes and matched control participants in Sweden
    Diabetologia, 2020
    Co-Authors: Emelie Andersson, Sofie Persson, Nino Hallén, Åsa Ericsson, Desirée Thielke, Peter Lindgren, Katarina Steen Carlsson, Johan Jendle
    Abstract:

    The risk of complications and medical consequences of type 2 diabetes are well known. Hospital costs have been identified as a key driver of total costs in studies of the economic burden of type 2 diabetes. Less evidence has been generated on the impact of individual diabetic complications on the overall societal burden. The objective of this study was to analyse costs of hospital-based healthcare (inpatient and outpatient care) and Work Absence related to individual macrovascular and microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes in Sweden in 2016. Data for 2016 were retrieved from a Swedish national retrospective observational database cross-linking individual-level data for 1997–2016. The database contained information from population-based health, social insurance and socioeconomic registers for 392,200 people with type 2 diabetes and matched control participants (5:1). Presence of type 2 diabetes and of diabetes complications were derived using all years, 1997–2016. Costs of hospital-based care and of Absence from Work due to diabetes complications were estimated for the year 2016. Regression analysis was used for comparison with control participants to attribute Absence from Work to individual complications, and to account for joint presence of complications. Use of hospital care for complications was higher in type 2 diabetes compared with control participants in 2016: 26% vs 12% had ≥1 hospital contact; there were 86,104 vs 24,608 outpatient visits per 100,000 people; and there were 9894 vs 2546 inpatient admissions per 100,000 people (all p 

  • costs of diabetes complications hospital based care and Absence from Work for 392 200 people with type 2 diabetes and matched control participants in sweden
    Diabetologia, 2020
    Co-Authors: Emelie Andersson, Sofie Persson, Nino Hallén, Åsa Ericsson, Desirée Thielke, Peter Lindgren, Katarina Steen Carlsson, Johan Jendle
    Abstract:

    The risk of complications and medical consequences of type 2 diabetes are well known. Hospital costs have been identified as a key driver of total costs in studies of the economic burden of type 2 diabetes. Less evidence has been generated on the impact of individual diabetic complications on the overall societal burden. The objective of this study was to analyse costs of hospital-based healthcare (inpatient and outpatient care) and Work Absence related to individual macrovascular and microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes in Sweden in 2016. Data for 2016 were retrieved from a Swedish national retrospective observational database cross-linking individual-level data for 1997–2016. The database contained information from population-based health, social insurance and socioeconomic registers for 392,200 people with type 2 diabetes and matched control participants (5:1). Presence of type 2 diabetes and of diabetes complications were derived using all years, 1997–2016. Costs of hospital-based care and of Absence from Work due to diabetes complications were estimated for the year 2016. Regression analysis was used for comparison with control participants to attribute Absence from Work to individual complications, and to account for joint presence of complications. Use of hospital care for complications was higher in type 2 diabetes compared with control participants in 2016: 26% vs 12% had ≥1 hospital contact; there were 86,104 vs 24,608 outpatient visits per 100,000 people; and there were 9894 vs 2546 inpatient admissions per 100,000 people (all p < 0.001). The corresponding total costs of hospital-based care for complications were €919 vs €232 per person (p < 0.001), and 74.7% of costs were then directly attributed to diabetes (€687 per person). Regression analyses distributed the costs of days absent from Work across diabetes complications per se, basic type 2 diabetes effect and unattributed causes. Diabetes complications amounted to €1317 per person in 2016, accounting for possible complex interactions (25% of total costs of days absent). Key drivers of costs were the macrovascular complications angina pectoris, heart failure and stroke; and the microvascular complications eye diseases, including retinopathy, kidney disease and neuropathy. Early mortality in Working ages cost an additional €579 per person and medications used in risk-factor treatment amounted to €418 per person. The economic burden of complications in type 2 diabetes is substantial. Costs of Absence from Work in this study were found to be greater than of hospital-based care, highlighting the need for considering treatment consequences in a societal perspective in research and policy. Graphical abstract

Emelie Andersson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Costs of diabetes complications: hospital-based care and Absence from Work for 392,200 people with type 2 diabetes and matched control participants in Sweden
    Diabetologia, 2020
    Co-Authors: Emelie Andersson, Sofie Persson, Nino Hallén, Åsa Ericsson, Desirée Thielke, Peter Lindgren, Katarina Steen Carlsson, Johan Jendle
    Abstract:

    Aims/hypothesis The risk of complications and medical consequences of type 2 diabetes are well known. Hospital costs have been identified as a key driver of total costs in studies of the economic burden of type 2 diabetes. Less evidence has been generated on the impact of individual diabetic complications on the overall societal burden. The objective of this study was to analyse costs of hospital-based healthcare (inpatient and outpatient care) and Work Absence related to individual macrovascular and microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes in Sweden in 2016. Methods Data for 2016 were retrieved from a Swedish national retrospective observational database cross-linking individual-level data for 1997–2016. The database contained information from population-based health, social insurance and socioeconomic registers for 392,200 people with type 2 diabetes and matched control participants (5:1). Presence of type 2 diabetes and of diabetes complications were derived using all years, 1997–2016. Costs of hospital-based care and of Absence from Work due to diabetes complications were estimated for the year 2016. Regression analysis was used for comparison with control participants to attribute Absence from Work to individual complications, and to account for joint presence of complications. Results Use of hospital care for complications was higher in type 2 diabetes compared with control participants in 2016: 26% vs 12% had ≥1 hospital contact; there were 86,104 vs 24,608 outpatient visits per 100,000 people; and there were 9894 vs 2546 inpatient admissions per 100,000 people (all p  

  • Costs of diabetes complications: hospital-based care and Absence from Work for 392,200 people with type 2 diabetes and matched control participants in Sweden
    Diabetologia, 2020
    Co-Authors: Emelie Andersson, Sofie Persson, Nino Hallén, Åsa Ericsson, Desirée Thielke, Peter Lindgren, Katarina Steen Carlsson, Johan Jendle
    Abstract:

    The risk of complications and medical consequences of type 2 diabetes are well known. Hospital costs have been identified as a key driver of total costs in studies of the economic burden of type 2 diabetes. Less evidence has been generated on the impact of individual diabetic complications on the overall societal burden. The objective of this study was to analyse costs of hospital-based healthcare (inpatient and outpatient care) and Work Absence related to individual macrovascular and microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes in Sweden in 2016. Data for 2016 were retrieved from a Swedish national retrospective observational database cross-linking individual-level data for 1997–2016. The database contained information from population-based health, social insurance and socioeconomic registers for 392,200 people with type 2 diabetes and matched control participants (5:1). Presence of type 2 diabetes and of diabetes complications were derived using all years, 1997–2016. Costs of hospital-based care and of Absence from Work due to diabetes complications were estimated for the year 2016. Regression analysis was used for comparison with control participants to attribute Absence from Work to individual complications, and to account for joint presence of complications. Use of hospital care for complications was higher in type 2 diabetes compared with control participants in 2016: 26% vs 12% had ≥1 hospital contact; there were 86,104 vs 24,608 outpatient visits per 100,000 people; and there were 9894 vs 2546 inpatient admissions per 100,000 people (all p 

  • costs of diabetes complications hospital based care and Absence from Work for 392 200 people with type 2 diabetes and matched control participants in sweden
    Diabetologia, 2020
    Co-Authors: Emelie Andersson, Sofie Persson, Nino Hallén, Åsa Ericsson, Desirée Thielke, Peter Lindgren, Katarina Steen Carlsson, Johan Jendle
    Abstract:

    The risk of complications and medical consequences of type 2 diabetes are well known. Hospital costs have been identified as a key driver of total costs in studies of the economic burden of type 2 diabetes. Less evidence has been generated on the impact of individual diabetic complications on the overall societal burden. The objective of this study was to analyse costs of hospital-based healthcare (inpatient and outpatient care) and Work Absence related to individual macrovascular and microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes in Sweden in 2016. Data for 2016 were retrieved from a Swedish national retrospective observational database cross-linking individual-level data for 1997–2016. The database contained information from population-based health, social insurance and socioeconomic registers for 392,200 people with type 2 diabetes and matched control participants (5:1). Presence of type 2 diabetes and of diabetes complications were derived using all years, 1997–2016. Costs of hospital-based care and of Absence from Work due to diabetes complications were estimated for the year 2016. Regression analysis was used for comparison with control participants to attribute Absence from Work to individual complications, and to account for joint presence of complications. Use of hospital care for complications was higher in type 2 diabetes compared with control participants in 2016: 26% vs 12% had ≥1 hospital contact; there were 86,104 vs 24,608 outpatient visits per 100,000 people; and there were 9894 vs 2546 inpatient admissions per 100,000 people (all p < 0.001). The corresponding total costs of hospital-based care for complications were €919 vs €232 per person (p < 0.001), and 74.7% of costs were then directly attributed to diabetes (€687 per person). Regression analyses distributed the costs of days absent from Work across diabetes complications per se, basic type 2 diabetes effect and unattributed causes. Diabetes complications amounted to €1317 per person in 2016, accounting for possible complex interactions (25% of total costs of days absent). Key drivers of costs were the macrovascular complications angina pectoris, heart failure and stroke; and the microvascular complications eye diseases, including retinopathy, kidney disease and neuropathy. Early mortality in Working ages cost an additional €579 per person and medications used in risk-factor treatment amounted to €418 per person. The economic burden of complications in type 2 diabetes is substantial. Costs of Absence from Work in this study were found to be greater than of hospital-based care, highlighting the need for considering treatment consequences in a societal perspective in research and policy. Graphical abstract

J. B. Staal – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Imaging versus no imaging for low back pain: a systematic review, measuring costs, healthcare utilization and Absence from Work
    European Spine Journal, 2019
    Co-Authors: G. P. G. Lemmers, W. Lankveld, G. P. Westert, P. J. Wees, J. B. Staal
    Abstract:

    Purpose Imaging (X-ray, CT and MRI) provides no health benefits for low back pain (LBP) patients and is not recommended in clinical practice guidelines. Whether imaging leads to increased costs, healthcare utilization or Absence from Work is unclear. Therefore, this study systematically reviews if imaging in patients with LBP leads to an increase in these outcomes. Methods We searched PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, Cochrane Library and Web of Science until October 2017 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies (OSs), comparing imaging versus no imaging on targeted outcomes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment was performed independently by two reviewers. The quality of the body of evidence was determined using GRADE methodology. Results Moderate-quality evidence (1 RCT; n  = 421) supports that direct costs increase for patients undergoing X-ray. Low-quality evidence (3 OSs; n  = 9535) supports that early MRI may lead to an increase in costs. There is moderate-quality evidence (1 RCT, 2 OSs; n  = 3897) that performing MRI or imaging (MRI or CT) is associated with an increase in healthcare utilization (e.g., future injections, surgery, medication, etc.). There is low-quality evidence (5 OSs; n  = 15,493) that performing X-ray or MRI is associated with an increase in healthcare utilization. Moderate-quality evidence (2 RCTs; n  = 667) showed no significant differences between X-ray or MRI groups compared with non-imaging groups on Absence from Work. However, low-quality evidence (2 Oss; n  = 7765) did show significantly greater mean Absence from Work in the MRI groups in comparison with the non-imaging groups. Conclusions Imaging in LBP may be associated with higher medical costs, increased healthcare utilization and more Absence from Work. Graphical abstract These slides can be retrieved under Electronic Supplementary Material.

  • Imaging versus no imaging for low back pain: a systematic review, measuring costs, healthcare utilization and Absence from Work.
    European spine journal : official publication of the European Spine Society the European Spinal Deformity Society and the European Section of the Cerv, 2019
    Co-Authors: G. P. G. Lemmers, G. P. Westert, W. Van Lankveld, P.j. Van Der Wees, J. B. Staal
    Abstract:

    Imaging (X-ray, CT and MRI) provides no health benefits for low back pain (LBP) patients and is not recommended in clinical practice guidelines. Whether imaging leads to increased costs, healthcare utilization or Absence from Work is unclear. Therefore, this study systematically reviews if imaging in patients with LBP leads to an increase in these outcomes. We searched PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, Cochrane Library and Web of Science until October 2017 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies (OSs), comparing imaging versus no imaging on targeted outcomes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment was performed independently by two reviewers. The quality of the body of evidence was determined using GRADE methodology. Moderate-quality evidence (1 RCT; n = 421) supports that direct costs increase for patients undergoing X-ray. Low-quality evidence (3 OSs; n = 9535) supports that early MRI may lead to an increase in costs. There is moderate-quality evidence (1 RCT, 2 OSs; n = 3897) that performing MRI or imaging (MRI or CT) is associated with an increase in healthcare utilization (e.g., future injections, surgery, medication, etc.). There is low-quality evidence (5 OSs; n = 15,493) that performing X-ray or MRI is associated with an increase in healthcare utilization. Moderate-quality evidence (2 RCTs; n = 667) showed no significant differences between X-ray or MRI groups compared with non-imaging groups on Absence from Work. However, low-quality evidence (2 Oss; n = 7765) did show significantly greater mean Absence from Work in the MRI groups in comparison with the non-imaging groups. Imaging in LBP may be associated with higher medical costs, increased healthcare utilization and more Absence from Work. These slides can be retrieved under Electronic Supplementary Material.