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Absorbable Suture Material

The Experts below are selected from a list of 156 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Takahiro Mimae – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • advantage of Absorbable Suture Material for pulmonary artery ligation
    The Japanese Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, 2010
    Co-Authors: Takahiro Mimae, Tsuneo Hirayasu, Keiko B. Kimura, Yoshihiro Miyata, Morihito Okada

    Abstract:

    The applicability of Absorbable Materials as ligatures of pulmonary vessels has not been described. The present study compares tissue reactions around sites of pulmonary arteries ligated with Absorbable Material (Vicryl) and with nonAbsorbable Material (silk). Beagle dogs underwent thoracotomy and the pulmonary artery branches were ligated with silk or Vicryl under general anesthesia. The ligated arterial tissues were obtained at 4 and 8 weeks after thoracotomy and processed for pathological analysis. The arteries ligated using Vicryl or silk were clinically completely sealed at 4 weeks after ligation. More inflammation and granuloma were evident at tissues surrounding ligations made with silk than with Vicryl at 8 weeks. Hyperplasia of the arterial intima continued at 8 weeks after ligation with both Vicryl and silk Sutures, although some hyperplasia similar to that in nonligated arterial intima appeared at 4 weeks after ligation. Less inflammation and granuloma are caused at arterial tissues around ligations accomplished with Absorbable Vicryl than those done with nonAbsorbable silk Sutures, although both are equally effective. Absorbable Sutures might be suitable for ligating pulmonary arteries.

  • Advantage of Absorbable Suture Material for pulmonary artery ligation
    General Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, 2010
    Co-Authors: Takahiro Mimae, Tsuneo Hirayasu, Keiko B. Kimura, Yoshihiro Miyata, Morihito Okada

    Abstract:

    Purpose The applicability of Absorbable Materials as ligatures of pulmonary vessels has not been described. The present study compares tissue reactions around sites of pulmonary arteries ligated with Absorbable Material (Vicryl) and with nonAbsorbable Material (silk). Methods Beagle dogs underwent thoracotomy and the pulmonary artery branches were ligated with silk or Vicryl under general anesthesia. The ligated arterial tissues were obtained at 4 and 8 weeks after thoracotomy and processed for pathological analysis. Results The arteries ligated using Vicryl or silk were clinically completely sealed at 4 weeks after ligation. More inflammation and granuloma were evident at tissues surrounding ligations made with silk than with Vicryl at 8 weeks. Hyperplasia of the arterial intima continued at 8 weeks after ligation with both Vicryl and silk Sutures, although some hyperplasia similar to that in nonligated arterial intima appeared at 4 weeks after ligation. Conclusion Less inflammation and granuloma are caused at arterial tissues around ligations accomplished with Absorbable Vicryl than those done with nonAbsorbable silk Sutures, although both are equally effective. Absorbable Sutures might be suitable for ligating pulmonary arteries.

Morihito Okada – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • advantage of Absorbable Suture Material for pulmonary artery ligation
    The Japanese Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, 2010
    Co-Authors: Takahiro Mimae, Tsuneo Hirayasu, Keiko B. Kimura, Yoshihiro Miyata, Morihito Okada

    Abstract:

    The applicability of Absorbable Materials as ligatures of pulmonary vessels has not been described. The present study compares tissue reactions around sites of pulmonary arteries ligated with Absorbable Material (Vicryl) and with nonAbsorbable Material (silk). Beagle dogs underwent thoracotomy and the pulmonary artery branches were ligated with silk or Vicryl under general anesthesia. The ligated arterial tissues were obtained at 4 and 8 weeks after thoracotomy and processed for pathological analysis. The arteries ligated using Vicryl or silk were clinically completely sealed at 4 weeks after ligation. More inflammation and granuloma were evident at tissues surrounding ligations made with silk than with Vicryl at 8 weeks. Hyperplasia of the arterial intima continued at 8 weeks after ligation with both Vicryl and silk Sutures, although some hyperplasia similar to that in nonligated arterial intima appeared at 4 weeks after ligation. Less inflammation and granuloma are caused at arterial tissues around ligations accomplished with Absorbable Vicryl than those done with nonAbsorbable silk Sutures, although both are equally effective. Absorbable Sutures might be suitable for ligating pulmonary arteries.

  • Advantage of Absorbable Suture Material for pulmonary artery ligation
    General Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, 2010
    Co-Authors: Takahiro Mimae, Tsuneo Hirayasu, Keiko B. Kimura, Yoshihiro Miyata, Morihito Okada

    Abstract:

    Purpose The applicability of Absorbable Materials as ligatures of pulmonary vessels has not been described. The present study compares tissue reactions around sites of pulmonary arteries ligated with Absorbable Material (Vicryl) and with nonAbsorbable Material (silk). Methods Beagle dogs underwent thoracotomy and the pulmonary artery branches were ligated with silk or Vicryl under general anesthesia. The ligated arterial tissues were obtained at 4 and 8 weeks after thoracotomy and processed for pathological analysis. Results The arteries ligated using Vicryl or silk were clinically completely sealed at 4 weeks after ligation. More inflammation and granuloma were evident at tissues surrounding ligations made with silk than with Vicryl at 8 weeks. Hyperplasia of the arterial intima continued at 8 weeks after ligation with both Vicryl and silk Sutures, although some hyperplasia similar to that in nonligated arterial intima appeared at 4 weeks after ligation. Conclusion Less inflammation and granuloma are caused at arterial tissues around ligations accomplished with Absorbable Vicryl than those done with nonAbsorbable silk Sutures, although both are equally effective. Absorbable Sutures might be suitable for ligating pulmonary arteries.

Shirou Kuwabara – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Bile duct stone formation around a nylon Suture after gastrectomy: A case report
    BMC Research Notes, 2013
    Co-Authors: Chiyo Maeda, Naoyuki Yokoyama, Tetsuya Otani, Tomohiro Katada, Natsuru Sudo, Yoshinobu Ikeno, Fumiaki Matsuura, Akira Iwaya, Toshiyuki Yamazaki, Shirou Kuwabara

    Abstract:

    Background Many cases of choledocholiths formed around Sutures and clips used during cholecystectomy have been reported. We describe a case of gallstone formation around a nylon Suture after non-biliary surgery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of such a case. Case presentation A 75-year-old Japanese man, who had undergone distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer and reconstruction with the Billroth II method 8 years earlier, presented with gastric discomfort. Abdominal ultrasonography was conducted and we diagnosed cholecysto-choledocholithiasis with dilatation of the intrahepatic bile duct. He underwent cholecystectomy and cholangioduodenostomy for choledocholith removal. Gallstones, which had formed around a nylon Suture used during the previous gastrectomy, were found in the bile duct. Sutures of the same Material had also been placed on the duodenum. Chemical analysis revealed that the stones were composed of calcium bilirubinate. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 19, and choledocholithiasis has not recurred thus far. Conclusion The findings from this case suggest that standard, non-resorbable Sutures used in gastrectomy may be associated with the formation of bile duct stones; therefore, Absorbable Suture Material may be required to avert gallstone formation even in the case of gastrectomy.