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Absorption Chiller

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Jocelyn Millette – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • simulation of an ammonia water Absorption Chiller
    Renewable Energy, 2013
    Co-Authors: Brice Le Lostec, Nicolas Galanis, Jocelyn Millette

    Abstract:

    An increased interest in Absorption Chillers has been observed [1] because these systems can utilize solar, geothermal and biomass energy sources, but also because they are quiet, vibration-free, require little maintenance and are ecological [2]. Instead of a compressor system, which uses electricity, an Absorption cooling system, using renewable energy and kinds of waste heat energy, may be used for cooling. This paper presents the simulation of a single stage solar Absorption Chiller operating with an ammonia–water mixture under steady state conditions. This simulation is based on heat and mass balances for each component. The heat and mass transfers in the absorber, the condensation of binary vapor of ammonia–water in the condenser and a thermosyphon desorber placed under the purification column were modeled. The numerical model was compared and validated with experimental data obtained with a solar Absorption Chiller. The calculated results agree well with experimental data. Simulations based on experimental data were used to predict the temperature and concentration profiles in each heat exchanger. A parametric study was conducted to investigate the effect of evaporator and desorber temperature on the Absorption Chiller‘s performance. The COP decreases by 25% with a decrease of 10 °C in evaporator temperature and the COP increases by 4% with an increase of 10 °C in desorber temperature.

  • Simulation of an ammonia–water Absorption Chiller
    Renewable Energy, 2013
    Co-Authors: Brice Le Lostec, Nicolas Galanis, Jocelyn Millette

    Abstract:

    An increased interest in Absorption Chillers has been observed [1] because these systems can utilize solar, geothermal and biomass energy sources, but also because they are quiet, vibration-free, require little maintenance and are ecological [2]. Instead of a compressor system, which uses electricity, an Absorption cooling system, using renewable energy and kinds of waste heat energy, may be used for cooling. This paper presents the simulation of a single stage solar Absorption Chiller operating with an ammonia–water mixture under steady state conditions. This simulation is based on heat and mass balances for each component. The heat and mass transfers in the absorber, the condensation of binary vapor of ammonia–water in the condenser and a thermosyphon desorber placed under the purification column were modeled. The numerical model was compared and validated with experimental data obtained with a solar Absorption Chiller. The calculated results agree well with experimental data. Simulations based on experimental data were used to predict the temperature and concentration profiles in each heat exchanger. A parametric study was conducted to investigate the effect of evaporator and desorber temperature on the Absorption Chiller‘s performance. The COP decreases by 25% with a decrease of 10 °C in evaporator temperature and the COP increases by 4% with an increase of 10 °C in desorber temperature.

  • Simulation of an ammonia-water Absorption Chiller
    Renewable Energy, 2013
    Co-Authors: Brice Le Lostec, Nicolas Galanis, Jocelyn Millette

    Abstract:

    An increased interest in Absorption Chillers has been observed [1] because these systems can utilize solar, geothermal and biomass energy sources, but also because they are quiet, vibration-free, require little maintenance and are ecological [2]. Instead of a compressor system, which uses electricity, an Absorption cooling system, using renewable energy and kinds of waste heat energy, may be used for cooling. This paper presents the simulation of a single stage solar Absorption Chiller operating with an ammonia-water mixture under steady state conditions. This simulation is based on heat and mass balances for each component. The heat and mass transfers in the absorber, the condensation of binary vapor of ammonia-water in the condenser and a thermosyphon desorber placed under the purification column were modeled. The numerical model was compared and validated with experimental data obtained with a solar Absorption Chiller. The calculated results agree well with experimental data. Simulations based on experimental data were used to predict the temperature and concentration profiles in each heat exchanger. A parametric study was conducted to investigate the effect of evaporator and desorber temperature on the Absorption Chiller‘s performance. The COP decreases by 25% with a decrease of 10°C in evaporator temperature and the COP increases by 4% with an increase of 10°C in desorber temperature. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

Dapeng Hu – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • performance simulation of the Absorption Chiller using water and ionic liquid 1 ethyl 3 methylimidazolium dimethylphosphate as the working pair
    Applied Thermal Engineering, 2011
    Co-Authors: Xiaodong Zhang, Dapeng Hu

    Abstract:

    Abstract The thermodynamic performance of the Absorption Chiller using water and ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethylphosphate ([EMIM][DMP]) as the working pair was simulated. In addition, the effects of evaporation temperature on the performance coefficient, COP, generation temperature, concentration of strong solution and flow rate ratio were also analyzed. At the same condensing and absorbing temperature, the simulating results indicated that the performance coefficient for the water + [EMIM][DMP] was lower than that for aqueous solution of lithium bromide (H2O + LiBr) but still higher than 0.7, while the generation temperature was lower than that for H2O + LiBr, which indicated that the working pair, water + [EMIM][DMP], was capable of being used as a novel working pair for the Absorption Chiller driven by lower temperature level waste heat or hot water generated by common solar collector.

  • Performance simulation of the Absorption Chiller using water and ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethylphosphate as the working pair
    Applied Thermal Engineering, 2011
    Co-Authors: Xiaodong Zhang, Dapeng Hu

    Abstract:

    The thermodynamic performance of the Absorption Chiller using water and ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethylphosphate ([EMIM][DMP]) as the working pair was simulated. In addition, the effects of evaporation temperature on the performance coefficient, COP, generation temperature, concentration of strong solution and flow rate ratio were also analyzed. At the same condensing and absorbing temperature, the simulating results indicated that the performance coefficient for the water + [EMIM][DMP] was lower than that for aqueous solution of lithium bromide (H2O + LiBr) but still higher than 0.7, while the generation temperature was lower than that for H2O + LiBr, which indicated that the working pair, water + [EMIM][DMP], was capable of being used as a novel working pair for the Absorption Chiller driven by lower temperature level waste heat or hot water generated by common solar collector. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

Brice Le Lostec – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • simulation of an ammonia water Absorption Chiller
    Renewable Energy, 2013
    Co-Authors: Brice Le Lostec, Nicolas Galanis, Jocelyn Millette

    Abstract:

    An increased interest in Absorption Chillers has been observed [1] because these systems can utilize solar, geothermal and biomass energy sources, but also because they are quiet, vibration-free, require little maintenance and are ecological [2]. Instead of a compressor system, which uses electricity, an Absorption cooling system, using renewable energy and kinds of waste heat energy, may be used for cooling. This paper presents the simulation of a single stage solar Absorption Chiller operating with an ammonia–water mixture under steady state conditions. This simulation is based on heat and mass balances for each component. The heat and mass transfers in the absorber, the condensation of binary vapor of ammonia–water in the condenser and a thermosyphon desorber placed under the purification column were modeled. The numerical model was compared and validated with experimental data obtained with a solar Absorption Chiller. The calculated results agree well with experimental data. Simulations based on experimental data were used to predict the temperature and concentration profiles in each heat exchanger. A parametric study was conducted to investigate the effect of evaporator and desorber temperature on the Absorption Chiller‘s performance. The COP decreases by 25% with a decrease of 10 °C in evaporator temperature and the COP increases by 4% with an increase of 10 °C in desorber temperature.

  • Simulation of an ammonia–water Absorption Chiller
    Renewable Energy, 2013
    Co-Authors: Brice Le Lostec, Nicolas Galanis, Jocelyn Millette

    Abstract:

    An increased interest in Absorption Chillers has been observed [1] because these systems can utilize solar, geothermal and biomass energy sources, but also because they are quiet, vibration-free, require little maintenance and are ecological [2]. Instead of a compressor system, which uses electricity, an Absorption cooling system, using renewable energy and kinds of waste heat energy, may be used for cooling. This paper presents the simulation of a single stage solar Absorption Chiller operating with an ammonia–water mixture under steady state conditions. This simulation is based on heat and mass balances for each component. The heat and mass transfers in the absorber, the condensation of binary vapor of ammonia–water in the condenser and a thermosyphon desorber placed under the purification column were modeled. The numerical model was compared and validated with experimental data obtained with a solar Absorption Chiller. The calculated results agree well with experimental data. Simulations based on experimental data were used to predict the temperature and concentration profiles in each heat exchanger. A parametric study was conducted to investigate the effect of evaporator and desorber temperature on the Absorption Chiller‘s performance. The COP decreases by 25% with a decrease of 10 °C in evaporator temperature and the COP increases by 4% with an increase of 10 °C in desorber temperature.

  • Simulation of an ammonia-water Absorption Chiller
    Renewable Energy, 2013
    Co-Authors: Brice Le Lostec, Nicolas Galanis, Jocelyn Millette

    Abstract:

    An increased interest in Absorption Chillers has been observed [1] because these systems can utilize solar, geothermal and biomass energy sources, but also because they are quiet, vibration-free, require little maintenance and are ecological [2]. Instead of a compressor system, which uses electricity, an Absorption cooling system, using renewable energy and kinds of waste heat energy, may be used for cooling. This paper presents the simulation of a single stage solar Absorption Chiller operating with an ammonia-water mixture under steady state conditions. This simulation is based on heat and mass balances for each component. The heat and mass transfers in the absorber, the condensation of binary vapor of ammonia-water in the condenser and a thermosyphon desorber placed under the purification column were modeled. The numerical model was compared and validated with experimental data obtained with a solar Absorption Chiller. The calculated results agree well with experimental data. Simulations based on experimental data were used to predict the temperature and concentration profiles in each heat exchanger. A parametric study was conducted to investigate the effect of evaporator and desorber temperature on the Absorption Chiller‘s performance. The COP decreases by 25% with a decrease of 10°C in evaporator temperature and the COP increases by 4% with an increase of 10°C in desorber temperature. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.