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Academic Failure

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Rena L. Repetti – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the effects of perceived daily social and Academic Failure experiences on school age children s subsequent interactions with parents
    Child Development, 1996
    Co-Authors: Rena L. Repetti
    Abstract:

    The hypothesis that perceived Failure experiences at school would increase the likelihood of aversive parent-child interactions after school was supported in a study of 167 fourth, fifth, and sixth graders. Children completed measures of mood, school events, and parent-child interaction 3 times each day for 2 consecutive days. Reports of social and Academic Failure experiences at school (e.g., peer problems and difficulty with schoolwork) were associated with increases in child self-reports of demanding and aversive behavior toward parents that evening. There was no evidence of the reverse effect; aversive child behavior did not predict an increase in reports of negative events the next day. When children rated more Academic Failure events at school, they also described their parents as more disapproving and punishing after school. However, this effect was only partially mediated by increases in the child’s aversive behavior. It is argued that the findings cannot be explained solely by a response bias caused by the child’s general mood or frame of mind that day. First, school-to-home mood spillover effects were controlled in the analyses. Second, reports of problems at school were not associated with other aspects of parent-child interaction (e.g., the parent’s positive behavioral and emotional involvement with the child). In addition to its substantive findings, the study illustrates use of an unbiased method for assessing child responses to daily stressors.

  • The Effects of Perceived Daily Social and Academic Failure Experiences on School‐Age Children’s Subsequent Interactions with Parents
    Child Development, 1996
    Co-Authors: Rena L. Repetti
    Abstract:

    The hypothesis that perceived Failure experiences at school would increase the likelihood of aversive parent-child interactions after school was supported in a study of 167 fourth, fifth, and sixth graders. Children completed measures of mood, school events, and parent-child interaction 3 times each day for 2 consecutive days. Reports of social and Academic Failure experiences at school (e.g., peer problems and difficulty with schoolwork) were associated with increases in child self-reports of demanding and aversive behavior toward parents that evening. There was no evidence of the reverse effect; aversive child behavior did not predict an increase in reports of negative events the next day. When children rated more Academic Failure events at school, they also described their parents as more disapproving and punishing after school. However, this effect was only partially mediated by increases in the child’s aversive behavior. It is argued that the findings cannot be explained solely by a response bias caused by the child’s general mood or frame of mind that day. First, school-to-home mood spillover effects were controlled in the analyses. Second, reports of problems at school were not associated with other aspects of parent-child interaction (e.g., the parent’s positive behavioral and emotional involvement with the child). In addition to its substantive findings, the study illustrates use of an unbiased method for assessing child responses to daily stressors.

Chandra Muller – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Academic Failure in secondary school the inter related role of health problems and educational context
    Social Problems, 2004
    Co-Authors: Belinda L. Needham, Robert Crosnoe, Chandra Muller
    Abstract:

    This study explores whether the interplay of health problems and school environment predicts Academic Failure, an individual event with consequences for the life course, as well as for society at large. This exploration proceeds in three steps: 1) we examine whether physical and mental health problems are an Academic risk factor during secondary school; 2) we investigate the Academic mechanisms underlying this risk status; and 3) we explore whether this risk status varies by school context. A series of logistic regressions reveals that self-rated health and emotional distress are both associated with greater likelihood of failing one or more classes in the next year and that absenteeism, trouble with homework, and student-teacher bonding account for much of these associations. Associations of physical and mental health problems with Academic Failure vary only slightly across schools, however. We discuss the implications of these findings for both research and policy and argue that the examination of overlap among different domains of adolescent functioning can advance the sociological understanding of health, education, and social problems in general.

Robert Crosnoe – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The connection between Academic Failure and adolescent drinking in secondary school
    Sociology of education, 2006
    Co-Authors: Robert Crosnoe
    Abstract:

    Academic Failure and drinking are both problematic aspects of the adolescent stage of the life course, and the connection between these two behaviors can disrupt the basic functioning of individuals and schools. Drawing on theories of problem behavior from multiple disciplines, this study attempted to determine whether Academic Failure was a risk factor for adolescent drinking, and vice versa, and then to identify the mechanisms underlying these two longitudinal associations. Cross-lagged models of data from 11,927 middle school and high school students in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health revealed that the number of classes failed in one year predicted alcohol use a year later more than early alcohol use predicted later class Failures. Aspects of social bonding (e.g., attachments to adults) and symptoms of general maladjustment (e.g., delinquency) did more than opportunity structures (e.g., peer norms) to explain the connection between these two behaviors over one year of secondary school.

  • Academic Failure in secondary school the inter related role of health problems and educational context
    Social Problems, 2004
    Co-Authors: Belinda L. Needham, Robert Crosnoe, Chandra Muller
    Abstract:

    This study explores whether the interplay of health problems and school environment predicts Academic Failure, an individual event with consequences for the life course, as well as for society at large. This exploration proceeds in three steps: 1) we examine whether physical and mental health problems are an Academic risk factor during secondary school; 2) we investigate the Academic mechanisms underlying this risk status; and 3) we explore whether this risk status varies by school context. A series of logistic regressions reveals that self-rated health and emotional distress are both associated with greater likelihood of failing one or more classes in the next year and that absenteeism, trouble with homework, and student-teacher bonding account for much of these associations. Associations of physical and mental health problems with Academic Failure vary only slightly across schools, however. We discuss the implications of these findings for both research and policy and argue that the examination of overlap among different domains of adolescent functioning can advance the sociological understanding of health, education, and social problems in general.

Belinda L. Needham – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Academic Failure in secondary school the inter related role of health problems and educational context
    Social Problems, 2004
    Co-Authors: Belinda L. Needham, Robert Crosnoe, Chandra Muller
    Abstract:

    This study explores whether the interplay of health problems and school environment predicts Academic Failure, an individual event with consequences for the life course, as well as for society at large. This exploration proceeds in three steps: 1) we examine whether physical and mental health problems are an Academic risk factor during secondary school; 2) we investigate the Academic mechanisms underlying this risk status; and 3) we explore whether this risk status varies by school context. A series of logistic regressions reveals that self-rated health and emotional distress are both associated with greater likelihood of failing one or more classes in the next year and that absenteeism, trouble with homework, and student-teacher bonding account for much of these associations. Associations of physical and mental health problems with Academic Failure vary only slightly across schools, however. We discuss the implications of these findings for both research and policy and argue that the examination of overlap among different domains of adolescent functioning can advance the sociological understanding of health, education, and social problems in general.

Howard B. Kaplan – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Decomposing the Academic Failure-dropout relationship : A longitudinal analysis
    The Journal of Educational Research, 1997
    Co-Authors: Diane S. Kaplan, B. Mitchell Peck, Howard B. Kaplan
    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT Data from a 4-wave panel (N = 1,195), tested in the 7th, 8th, and 9th grades and as young adults, were used to estimate a causal model. The model was used to decompose a previously observed relationship between 7th-grade Academic Failure and later dropout behavior in terms of 5 theoretically informed mediating variables. The Academic Failure–dropout relationship was partially decomposed by the mediating effects of low motivation, association with deviant peers, and perception of rejection by the students at school. Although perception of rejection by teachers and resistance toward school were, as hypothesized, influenced by earlier negative Academic experiences, they had no independent effects on dropping out net of their relationship to association with deviant peers or low motivation. Implications for current practice and future research are also discussed.

  • Structural Relations Model of Self-Rejection, Disposition to Deviance, and Academic Failure
    The Journal of Educational Research, 1994
    Co-Authors: Diane S. Kaplan, B. Mitchell Peck, Howard B. Kaplan
    Abstract:

    Abstract Using three-wave panel data from 1,756 junior high school students, and LISREL VII, the authors estimated a theoretically informed structural model that specifies a linkage between self-derogation in a school context and subsequent Academic Failure that is mediated by a disposition to deviate from conventional expectations. The model is a specific application in the school setting of a general model of deviant adaptations in response to context-specific self-devaluing experiences. Results support the idea that Academic Failure, in part, is motivated behavior that may be viewed as an adaptation to previous self-devaluing experiences within a school context.