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Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm

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Feifan Ouyang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • idiopathic Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm or ventricular tachycardia originating from the right bundle branch
    Circulation-arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Minglong Chen, Kai Gu, Bing Yang, Hongwu Chen, Weizhu Ju, Fengxiang Zhang, Gang Yang, Mingfang Li, Xinzheng Lu, Feifan Ouyang
    Abstract:

    Background—Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm (AIVR) or ventricular tachtachycardia (VT) originating from the right bundle branch (RBB) is rare and published clinical data on such arRhythmia are scarce…

  • idiopathic Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm or ventricular tachycardia originating from the right bundle branchclinical perspective
    Circulation-arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Minglong Chen, Kai Gu, Bing Yang, Hongwu Chen, Weizhu Ju, Fengxiang Zhang, Gang Yang, Mingfang Li, Xinzheng Lu, Feifan Ouyang
    Abstract:

    Background— Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm (AIVR) or ventricular tachtachycardia (VT) originating from the right bundle branch (RBB) is rare and published clinical data on such arRhythmia are scarce. In this study, we will describe the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of a cohort of patients with this novel arRhythmia. Methods and Results— Eight patients (5 men; median age, 25 years) with RBB-AIVR/VT were consecutively enrolled in the study. Pharmacological testing, exercise treadmill testing, electrophysiological study, and catheter ablation were performed in the study patients, and ECG features were characterized. All RBB-AIVR/VTs were of typical left bundle-branch block morphology with atrioventricular dissociation. The arRhythmias, which demonstrated chronotropic variability, were often isoRhythmic with sinus Rhythm and were Accelerated by physical exercise, stress, and intravenous isoprenaline infusion. The rate of RBB-AIVR/VT varied from 45 to 200 beats per minute. Two patients experienced syncope, and 3 had impaired left ventricular function. Metoprolol was proven to be the most effective drug to decelerate the arRhythmia rate and relieve symptoms. Electrophysiology study was performed in 5 patients and the earliest activation with a sharp RBB potential was localized in the mid or distal RBB area. Catheter ablation terminated the arRhythmia with subsequent RBB block morphology during sinus Rhythm. During follow-up, patients’ symptoms were controlled with normalization of left ventricular function either on metoprolol or by catheter ablation. Conclusions— RBB-AIVR/VT is an unusual type of ventricular arRhythmia. It can result in significant symptoms and depressed ventricular function and can be successfully treated with catheter ablation.

  • idiopathic Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm or ventricular tachycardia originating from the right bundle branchclinical perspective unusual type of ventricular arRhythmia
    Circulation-arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Minglong Chen, Kai Gu, Bing Yang, Hongwu Chen, Weizhu Ju, Fengxiang Zhang, Gang Yang, Mingfang Li, Xinzheng Lu, Feifan Ouyang
    Abstract:

    Background— Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm (AIVR) or ventricular tachtachycardia (VT) originating from the right bundle branch (RBB) is rare and published clinical data on such arRhythmia are scarce. In this study, we will describe the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of a cohort of patients with this novel arRhythmia. Methods and Results— Eight patients (5 men; median age, 25 years) with RBB-AIVR/VT were consecutively enrolled in the study. Pharmacological testing, exercise treadmill testing, electrophysiological study, and catheter ablation were performed in the study patients, and ECG features were characterized. All RBB-AIVR/VTs were of typical left bundle-branch block morphology with atrioventricular dissociation. The arRhythmias, which demonstrated chronotropic variability, were often isoRhythmic with sinus Rhythm and were Accelerated by physical exercise, stress, and intravenous isoprenaline infusion. The rate of RBB-AIVR/VT varied from 45 to 200 beats per minute. Two patients experienced syncope, and 3 had impaired left ventricular function. Metoprolol was proven to be the most effective drug to decelerate the arRhythmia rate and relieve symptoms. Electrophysiology study was performed in 5 patients and the earliest activation with a sharp RBB potential was localized in the mid or distal RBB area. Catheter ablation terminated the arRhythmia with subsequent RBB block morphology during sinus Rhythm. During follow-up, patients’ symptoms were controlled with normalization of left ventricular function either on metoprolol or by catheter ablation. Conclusions— RBB-AIVR/VT is an unusual type of ventricular arRhythmia. It can result in significant symptoms and depressed ventricular function and can be successfully treated with catheter ablation.

Minglong Chen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • DOI: 10.1161/CIRCEP.114.002112 1 Idiopathic Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm or Ventricular Tachycardia Originating from the Right Bundle Branch: An Unusual Type
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Of Ventricular Arrhythmia, Kejiang Cao, Md Feifan Ouyang, Abteilung Allgemeines Krankenhaus St. Georg, Contributed Equally, Minglong Chen
    Abstract:

    Background- Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm (AIVR) or ventricular tachtachycardia (VT) originating from the right bundle branch (RBB) is rare and published clinical data regarding such arRhythmia is scarce. In this study, we will describe the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management of a cohort of patients with this novel arRhythmia. Methods and Results- Eight patients (5 males; median age 25 years) with RBB-AIVR/VT were consecutively enrolled in the study. Pharmacologic testing, exercise treadmill testing, electrophysiological study and catheter ablation were performed in the study patients and ECG features were characterized. All RBB-AIVR/VTs were of typical LBBB morphology with atrio-ventricular dissociation. The arRhythmias demonstrated chronotropic variability, were often isoRhythmic with sinus Rhythm, and were Accelerated by physical exercise, stress, and intravenous isoprenaline infusion. The rate of RBB-AIVR/VT varied from 45 to 200 bpm. Two patients experienced syncope and three had impaired LV function. Metoprolol was proven to be the most effective drug to decelerate the arRhythmia rate and relieve symptoms. Electrophysiology study was performed in 5 patients and the earliest activation with a sharp RBB potential was localized in the mid or distal RBB area. Catheter ablation terminated th

  • idiopathic Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm or ventricular tachycardia originating from the right bundle branch
    Circulation-arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Minglong Chen, Kai Gu, Bing Yang, Hongwu Chen, Weizhu Ju, Fengxiang Zhang, Gang Yang, Mingfang Li, Xinzheng Lu, Feifan Ouyang
    Abstract:

    Background—Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm (AIVR) or ventricular tachycardia (VT) originating from the right bundle branch (RBB) is rare and published clinical data on such arRhythmia are scarce…

  • idiopathic Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm or ventricular tachycardia originating from the right bundle branchclinical perspective
    Circulation-arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Minglong Chen, Kai Gu, Bing Yang, Hongwu Chen, Weizhu Ju, Fengxiang Zhang, Gang Yang, Mingfang Li, Xinzheng Lu, Feifan Ouyang
    Abstract:

    Background— Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm (AIVR) or ventricular tachycardia (VT) originating from the right bundle branch (RBB) is rare and published clinical data on such arRhythmia are scarce. In this study, we will describe the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of a cohort of patients with this novel arRhythmia. Methods and Results— Eight patients (5 men; median age, 25 years) with RBB-AIVR/VT were consecutively enrolled in the study. Pharmacological testing, exercise treadmill testing, electrophysiological study, and catheter ablation were performed in the study patients, and ECG features were characterized. All RBB-AIVR/VTs were of typical left bundle-branch block morphology with atrioventricular dissociation. The arRhythmias, which demonstrated chronotropic variability, were often isoRhythmic with sinus Rhythm and were Accelerated by physical exercise, stress, and intravenous isoprenaline infusion. The rate of RBB-AIVR/VT varied from 45 to 200 beats per minute. Two patients experienced syncope, and 3 had impaired left ventricular function. Metoprolol was proven to be the most effective drug to decelerate the arRhythmia rate and relieve symptoms. Electrophysiology study was performed in 5 patients and the earliest activation with a sharp RBB potential was localized in the mid or distal RBB area. Catheter ablation terminated the arRhythmia with subsequent RBB block morphology during sinus Rhythm. During follow-up, patients’ symptoms were controlled with normalization of left ventricular function either on metoprolol or by catheter ablation. Conclusions— RBB-AIVR/VT is an unusual type of ventricular arRhythmia. It can result in significant symptoms and depressed ventricular function and can be successfully treated with catheter ablation.

Hongwu Chen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • idiopathic Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm or ventricular tachycardia originating from the right bundle branch
    Circulation-arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Minglong Chen, Kai Gu, Bing Yang, Hongwu Chen, Weizhu Ju, Fengxiang Zhang, Gang Yang, Mingfang Li, Xinzheng Lu, Feifan Ouyang
    Abstract:

    Background—Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm (AIVR) or ventricular tachycardia (VT) originating from the right bundle branch (RBB) is rare and published clinical data on such arRhythmia are scarce…

  • idiopathic Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm or ventricular tachycardia originating from the right bundle branchclinical perspective
    Circulation-arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Minglong Chen, Kai Gu, Bing Yang, Hongwu Chen, Weizhu Ju, Fengxiang Zhang, Gang Yang, Mingfang Li, Xinzheng Lu, Feifan Ouyang
    Abstract:

    Background— Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm (AIVR) or ventricular tachycardia (VT) originating from the right bundle branch (RBB) is rare and published clinical data on such arRhythmia are scarce. In this study, we will describe the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of a cohort of patients with this novel arRhythmia. Methods and Results— Eight patients (5 men; median age, 25 years) with RBB-AIVR/VT were consecutively enrolled in the study. Pharmacological testing, exercise treadmill testing, electrophysiological study, and catheter ablation were performed in the study patients, and ECG features were characterized. All RBB-AIVR/VTs were of typical left bundle-branch block morphology with atrioventricular dissociation. The arRhythmias, which demonstrated chronotropic variability, were often isoRhythmic with sinus Rhythm and were Accelerated by physical exercise, stress, and intravenous isoprenaline infusion. The rate of RBB-AIVR/VT varied from 45 to 200 beats per minute. Two patients experienced syncope, and 3 had impaired left ventricular function. Metoprolol was proven to be the most effective drug to decelerate the arRhythmia rate and relieve symptoms. Electrophysiology study was performed in 5 patients and the earliest activation with a sharp RBB potential was localized in the mid or distal RBB area. Catheter ablation terminated the arRhythmia with subsequent RBB block morphology during sinus Rhythm. During follow-up, patients’ symptoms were controlled with normalization of left ventricular function either on metoprolol or by catheter ablation. Conclusions— RBB-AIVR/VT is an unusual type of ventricular arRhythmia. It can result in significant symptoms and depressed ventricular function and can be successfully treated with catheter ablation.

  • idiopathic Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm or ventricular tachycardia originating from the right bundle branchclinical perspective unusual type of ventricular arRhythmia
    Circulation-arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Minglong Chen, Kai Gu, Bing Yang, Hongwu Chen, Weizhu Ju, Fengxiang Zhang, Gang Yang, Mingfang Li, Xinzheng Lu, Feifan Ouyang
    Abstract:

    Background— Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm (AIVR) or ventricular tachycardia (VT) originating from the right bundle branch (RBB) is rare and published clinical data on such arRhythmia are scarce. In this study, we will describe the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of a cohort of patients with this novel arRhythmia. Methods and Results— Eight patients (5 men; median age, 25 years) with RBB-AIVR/VT were consecutively enrolled in the study. Pharmacological testing, exercise treadmill testing, electrophysiological study, and catheter ablation were performed in the study patients, and ECG features were characterized. All RBB-AIVR/VTs were of typical left bundle-branch block morphology with atrioventricular dissociation. The arRhythmias, which demonstrated chronotropic variability, were often isoRhythmic with sinus Rhythm and were Accelerated by physical exercise, stress, and intravenous isoprenaline infusion. The rate of RBB-AIVR/VT varied from 45 to 200 beats per minute. Two patients experienced syncope, and 3 had impaired left ventricular function. Metoprolol was proven to be the most effective drug to decelerate the arRhythmia rate and relieve symptoms. Electrophysiology study was performed in 5 patients and the earliest activation with a sharp RBB potential was localized in the mid or distal RBB area. Catheter ablation terminated the arRhythmia with subsequent RBB block morphology during sinus Rhythm. During follow-up, patients’ symptoms were controlled with normalization of left ventricular function either on metoprolol or by catheter ablation. Conclusions— RBB-AIVR/VT is an unusual type of ventricular arRhythmia. It can result in significant symptoms and depressed ventricular function and can be successfully treated with catheter ablation.

Mingfang Li – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • idiopathic Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm or ventricular tachycardia originating from the right bundle branch
    Circulation-arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Minglong Chen, Kai Gu, Bing Yang, Hongwu Chen, Weizhu Ju, Fengxiang Zhang, Gang Yang, Mingfang Li, Xinzheng Lu, Feifan Ouyang
    Abstract:

    Background—Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm (AIVR) or ventricular tachycardia (VT) originating from the right bundle branch (RBB) is rare and published clinical data on such arRhythmia are scarce…

  • idiopathic Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm or ventricular tachycardia originating from the right bundle branchclinical perspective
    Circulation-arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Minglong Chen, Kai Gu, Bing Yang, Hongwu Chen, Weizhu Ju, Fengxiang Zhang, Gang Yang, Mingfang Li, Xinzheng Lu, Feifan Ouyang
    Abstract:

    Background— Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm (AIVR) or ventricular tachycardia (VT) originating from the right bundle branch (RBB) is rare and published clinical data on such arRhythmia are scarce. In this study, we will describe the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of a cohort of patients with this novel arRhythmia. Methods and Results— Eight patients (5 men; median age, 25 years) with RBB-AIVR/VT were consecutively enrolled in the study. Pharmacological testing, exercise treadmill testing, electrophysiological study, and catheter ablation were performed in the study patients, and ECG features were characterized. All RBB-AIVR/VTs were of typical left bundle-branch block morphology with atrioventricular dissociation. The arRhythmias, which demonstrated chronotropic variability, were often isoRhythmic with sinus Rhythm and were Accelerated by physical exercise, stress, and intravenous isoprenaline infusion. The rate of RBB-AIVR/VT varied from 45 to 200 beats per minute. Two patients experienced syncope, and 3 had impaired left ventricular function. Metoprolol was proven to be the most effective drug to decelerate the arRhythmia rate and relieve symptoms. Electrophysiology study was performed in 5 patients and the earliest activation with a sharp RBB potential was localized in the mid or distal RBB area. Catheter ablation terminated the arRhythmia with subsequent RBB block morphology during sinus Rhythm. During follow-up, patients’ symptoms were controlled with normalization of left ventricular function either on metoprolol or by catheter ablation. Conclusions— RBB-AIVR/VT is an unusual type of ventricular arRhythmia. It can result in significant symptoms and depressed ventricular function and can be successfully treated with catheter ablation.

  • idiopathic Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm or ventricular tachycardia originating from the right bundle branchclinical perspective unusual type of ventricular arRhythmia
    Circulation-arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Minglong Chen, Kai Gu, Bing Yang, Hongwu Chen, Weizhu Ju, Fengxiang Zhang, Gang Yang, Mingfang Li, Xinzheng Lu, Feifan Ouyang
    Abstract:

    Background— Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm (AIVR) or ventricular tachycardia (VT) originating from the right bundle branch (RBB) is rare and published clinical data on such arRhythmia are scarce. In this study, we will describe the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of a cohort of patients with this novel arRhythmia. Methods and Results— Eight patients (5 men; median age, 25 years) with RBB-AIVR/VT were consecutively enrolled in the study. Pharmacological testing, exercise treadmill testing, electrophysiological study, and catheter ablation were performed in the study patients, and ECG features were characterized. All RBB-AIVR/VTs were of typical left bundle-branch block morphology with atrioventricular dissociation. The arRhythmias, which demonstrated chronotropic variability, were often isoRhythmic with sinus Rhythm and were Accelerated by physical exercise, stress, and intravenous isoprenaline infusion. The rate of RBB-AIVR/VT varied from 45 to 200 beats per minute. Two patients experienced syncope, and 3 had impaired left ventricular function. Metoprolol was proven to be the most effective drug to decelerate the arRhythmia rate and relieve symptoms. Electrophysiology study was performed in 5 patients and the earliest activation with a sharp RBB potential was localized in the mid or distal RBB area. Catheter ablation terminated the arRhythmia with subsequent RBB block morphology during sinus Rhythm. During follow-up, patients’ symptoms were controlled with normalization of left ventricular function either on metoprolol or by catheter ablation. Conclusions— RBB-AIVR/VT is an unusual type of ventricular arRhythmia. It can result in significant symptoms and depressed ventricular function and can be successfully treated with catheter ablation.

Xinzheng Lu – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • idiopathic Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm or ventricular tachycardia originating from the right bundle branch
    Circulation-arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Minglong Chen, Kai Gu, Bing Yang, Hongwu Chen, Weizhu Ju, Fengxiang Zhang, Gang Yang, Mingfang Li, Xinzheng Lu, Feifan Ouyang
    Abstract:

    Background—Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm (AIVR) or ventricular tachycardia (VT) originating from the right bundle branch (RBB) is rare and published clinical data on such arRhythmia are scarce…

  • idiopathic Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm or ventricular tachycardia originating from the right bundle branchclinical perspective
    Circulation-arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Minglong Chen, Kai Gu, Bing Yang, Hongwu Chen, Weizhu Ju, Fengxiang Zhang, Gang Yang, Mingfang Li, Xinzheng Lu, Feifan Ouyang
    Abstract:

    Background— Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm (AIVR) or ventricular tachycardia (VT) originating from the right bundle branch (RBB) is rare and published clinical data on such arRhythmia are scarce. In this study, we will describe the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of a cohort of patients with this novel arRhythmia. Methods and Results— Eight patients (5 men; median age, 25 years) with RBB-AIVR/VT were consecutively enrolled in the study. Pharmacological testing, exercise treadmill testing, electrophysiological study, and catheter ablation were performed in the study patients, and ECG features were characterized. All RBB-AIVR/VTs were of typical left bundle-branch block morphology with atrioventricular dissociation. The arRhythmias, which demonstrated chronotropic variability, were often isoRhythmic with sinus Rhythm and were Accelerated by physical exercise, stress, and intravenous isoprenaline infusion. The rate of RBB-AIVR/VT varied from 45 to 200 beats per minute. Two patients experienced syncope, and 3 had impaired left ventricular function. Metoprolol was proven to be the most effective drug to decelerate the arRhythmia rate and relieve symptoms. Electrophysiology study was performed in 5 patients and the earliest activation with a sharp RBB potential was localized in the mid or distal RBB area. Catheter ablation terminated the arRhythmia with subsequent RBB block morphology during sinus Rhythm. During follow-up, patients’ symptoms were controlled with normalization of left ventricular function either on metoprolol or by catheter ablation. Conclusions— RBB-AIVR/VT is an unusual type of ventricular arRhythmia. It can result in significant symptoms and depressed ventricular function and can be successfully treated with catheter ablation.

  • idiopathic Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm or ventricular tachycardia originating from the right bundle branchclinical perspective unusual type of ventricular arRhythmia
    Circulation-arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Minglong Chen, Kai Gu, Bing Yang, Hongwu Chen, Weizhu Ju, Fengxiang Zhang, Gang Yang, Mingfang Li, Xinzheng Lu, Feifan Ouyang
    Abstract:

    Background— Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm (AIVR) or ventricular tachycardia (VT) originating from the right bundle branch (RBB) is rare and published clinical data on such arRhythmia are scarce. In this study, we will describe the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of a cohort of patients with this novel arRhythmia. Methods and Results— Eight patients (5 men; median age, 25 years) with RBB-AIVR/VT were consecutively enrolled in the study. Pharmacological testing, exercise treadmill testing, electrophysiological study, and catheter ablation were performed in the study patients, and ECG features were characterized. All RBB-AIVR/VTs were of typical left bundle-branch block morphology with atrioventricular dissociation. The arRhythmias, which demonstrated chronotropic variability, were often isoRhythmic with sinus Rhythm and were Accelerated by physical exercise, stress, and intravenous isoprenaline infusion. The rate of RBB-AIVR/VT varied from 45 to 200 beats per minute. Two patients experienced syncope, and 3 had impaired left ventricular function. Metoprolol was proven to be the most effective drug to decelerate the arRhythmia rate and relieve symptoms. Electrophysiology study was performed in 5 patients and the earliest activation with a sharp RBB potential was localized in the mid or distal RBB area. Catheter ablation terminated the arRhythmia with subsequent RBB block morphology during sinus Rhythm. During follow-up, patients’ symptoms were controlled with normalization of left ventricular function either on metoprolol or by catheter ablation. Conclusions— RBB-AIVR/VT is an unusual type of ventricular arRhythmia. It can result in significant symptoms and depressed ventricular function and can be successfully treated with catheter ablation.