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Accessory Muscle

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Nayak Satheesha – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • jugulo facial venous circle Accessory slip of trapezius and absence of typical facial vein clinically important anatomical variations
    Journal of The Anatomical Society of India, 2017
    Co-Authors: Nayak Satheesha

    Abstract:

    Abstract Knowledge of facial and external jugular vein variations is useful for medical disciplines such as radiology, anesthesia, general surgery and plastic surgery for the success in their procedures in the head and neck region. I report a unique combination of venous and muscular variation in the left side of the neck of an adult male cadaver. The typical facial vein was absent. Facial vein was represented as a vena comitans of facial artery. The common facial vein joined with the external jugular vein to form a jugulo-facial venous circle above the lateral part of the clavicle. This circle was closely related to an Accessory Muscle slip from the trapezius. Further, the common facial vein was connected to the anterior jugular vein through a large anonymous vein. I discuss the clinical implications of these variations.

  • Jugulo-facial venous circle, Accessory slip of trapezius and absence of typical facial vein—Clinically important anatomical variations
    Journal of The Anatomical Society of India, 2017
    Co-Authors: Nayak Satheesha

    Abstract:

    Abstract Knowledge of facial and external jugular vein variations is useful for medical disciplines such as radiology, anesthesia, general surgery and plastic surgery for the success in their procedures in the head and neck region. I report a unique combination of venous and muscular variation in the left side of the neck of an adult male cadaver. The typical facial vein was absent. Facial vein was represented as a vena comitans of facial artery. The common facial vein joined with the external jugular vein to form a jugulo-facial venous circle above the lateral part of the clavicle. This circle was closely related to an Accessory Muscle slip from the trapezius. Further, the common facial vein was connected to the anterior jugular vein through a large anonymous vein. I discuss the clinical implications of these variations.

Gayatri Rath – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • A CLINICO-ANATOMICAL REPORT OF AN Accessory Muscle FASCICLE EMANATING FROM SARTORIUS Muscle
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Vandana Mehta, Ashwini Kumar, Jyoti Arora, Gayatri Rath

    Abstract:

    Accessory Muscle fascicles are rarely observed in relation to the sartorius Muscle (SM) of the lower extremity. The existing case description reports a rare presence of an Accessory Muscle fascicle seen to pass from the SM to the vastus medialis Muscle (VM) found unilaterally in the anterior aspect of the right thigh of an adult Indian male cadaver. The anomaly was observed accidentally while demonstrating the extensor aspect of the thigh to the undergraduate students. We wish to bring attention to the various aspects of clinical usages of such a supernumerary Muscle. Ultrasonologists should be aware of the possible presence of Accessory Muscle fascicles while investigating this region prior to anesthesia or exploration of this area. This unusual Accessory Muscle should be cited in clinical texts for cautioning the reconstructive surgeons and the radiologists.

  • Anomalous constitution of the brachioradialis Muscle: a potential site of radial nerve entrapment.
    Clinica Terapeutica, 2020
    Co-Authors: Vandana Mehta, Jyoti Arora, Rajesh Kumar Suri, Gayatri Rath

    Abstract:

    : The anatomical relationships of structures in the elbow region in the context of surgical approaches require to be studied carefully and diligently. The main aim of the present study is to report an Accessory Muscle in the elbow region which was detected during routine anatomical dissection and discuss its clinical importance. The Muscle belly measured 4.8 x 2.1cm and it fused with the brachioradialis distally. Proximally, it was seen to blend with the deltoid and the brachialis Muscles. The radial nerve was observed to interpose between this Accessory Muscle and the brachioradialis. This could act as a potential site of compression neuropathy. The present study seeks to elucidate the morphology and potential function of an additional Muscle belly in relation to the brachioradialis Muscle. A comprehensive knowledge of the anatomical characteristics of brachialis, brachioradialis and radial nerve should prove extremely helpful for the hand surgeons to considerably reduce the risk of injury during operative maneuvers.

  • Clinico-anatomical description of an Accessory flexor pollicis longus.
    Clinica Terapeutica, 2020
    Co-Authors: Mehta, Suri Rk, Arora J, Gayatri Rath

    Abstract:

    : Several instances of Accessory musculature of the upper extremity are now recognized. During regular dissection class of undergraduate medical students, we observed an important anatomic variation pertaining to the flexor pollicis longus Muscle (FPL) in the left upper limb of an adult male cadaver. An Accessory Muscle belly extending from the deep aspect of flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) to the tendon of the FPL was observed in the flexor surface of the antebrachium. The description of Gantzer’s Muscle (GM) is well elucidated in anatomical archives and is described as an Accessory Muscle extending from the superficial to the deep flexors of the digits.

Mehmet Tevfik Demir – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Accessory Muscle in the forearm a clinical and embryological approach
    Anatomy & Cell Biology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Engin Ciftcioglu, Cem Kopuz, Ufuk Corumlu, Mehmet Tevfik Demir

    Abstract:

    Muscular variations of the flexor compartment of forearm are usual and can result in multiple clinical conditions limiting the functions of forearm and hand. The variations of the Muscles, especially Accessory Muscles may simulate soft tissue tumors and can result in nerve compressions. During a routine dissection of the anterior region of the forearm and hand, an unusual Muscle was observed on the left side of a 65-year-old male cadaver. The anomalous Muscle belly arose from the medial epicondyle approxiamately 1 cm posterolateral to origin of normal flexor carpi ulnaris Muscle (FCU), and from proximal part of the flexor digitorum superficialis Muscle. It inserted to the triquetral, hamate bones and flexor retinaculum. Passive traction on the tendon of Accessory Muscle resulted in flexion of radiocarpal junction. The FCU which had one head, inserted to the pisiform bone hook of hamate and palmar aponeurosis. Its contiguous Muscles displayed normal morphology. Knowledge of the existence of Muscle anomalies as well as the location of compression is useful in determining the pathology and appropriate treatment for compressive neuropathies. In this study, a rare Accessory Muscle has been described.