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Acentric Fragment

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Edwin H. Goodwin – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Transmission of radiation-induced Acentric chromosomal Fragments to micronuclei in normal human fibroblasts.
    Radiation research, 1991
    Co-Authors: Michael N. Cornforth, Edwin H. Goodwin
    Abstract:

    A simplifying assumption made when calculating the probability of a chromosomal aberration resulting in a micronucleus is that virtually all radiation-induced micronuclei result from Acentric Fragments. In the present study we used antibodies to chromosomal centromeres (kinetochores) to determine the frequency of centric versus Acentric micronuclei in normal human fibroblasts exposed to 6 Gy of60 Co γ rays while they were in density-inhibited growth. Up to 14% of the micronuclei induced by this exposure contained one or more kinetochores; i.e., they were not composed of Acentric chromatin. By deleting kinetochore-positive micronuclei from the analysis, and by reconstructing micronucleus frequencies based on the fraction of cells that had divided following radiation exposure, a direct comparison between micronuclei and Acentric chromosome Fragments was made. On that basis, the probability of an Acentric Fragment becoming a visible micronucleus in either daughter cell of a dividing pair was estimated to be …

Jonathan D G Jones – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • aberrant transpositions of maize double ds like elements usually involve ds ends on sister chromatids
    The Plant Cell, 1995
    Co-Authors: James J English, Kate Harrison, Jonathan D G Jones
    Abstract:

    McClintock9s analysis of chromosome-breaking Dissociation (Ds) elements in maize demonstrated that sister chromatids fuse at the position of Ds, forming a dicentric chromosome and an Acentric Fragment. In tobacco, Ds left and right ends in direct orientation (that is, half a double Ds) are sufficient to promote Activator-dependent marker gene loss. We present here a detailed analysis of germinally inherited rearrangements promoted by “half double Ds” elements and a characterization of rearrangements that involve inversion of the segment between the Ds ends and/or deletion of a segment adjacent to the Ds construct. The results support a model in which chromosome breakage promoted by these elements, and presumably by double Ds elements, involves Ds ends on sister chromatids.

Michael N. Cornforth – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Transmission of radiation-induced Acentric chromosomal Fragments to micronuclei in normal human fibroblasts.
    Radiation research, 1991
    Co-Authors: Michael N. Cornforth, Edwin H. Goodwin
    Abstract:

    A simplifying assumption made when calculating the probability of a chromosomal aberration resulting in a micronucleus is that virtually all radiation-induced micronuclei result from Acentric Fragments. In the present study we used antibodies to chromosomal centromeres (kinetochores) to determine the frequency of centric versus Acentric micronuclei in normal human fibroblasts exposed to 6 Gy of60 Co γ rays while they were in density-inhibited growth. Up to 14% of the micronuclei induced by this exposure contained one or more kinetochores; i.e., they were not composed of Acentric chromatin. By deleting kinetochore-positive micronuclei from the analysis, and by reconstructing micronucleus frequencies based on the fraction of cells that had divided following radiation exposure, a direct comparison between micronuclei and Acentric chromosome Fragments was made. On that basis, the probability of an Acentric Fragment becoming a visible micronucleus in either daughter cell of a dividing pair was estimated to be …