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Acer Saccharinum

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John E. Preece – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The influence of plant growth regulators on explant performance, bud break, and shoot growth from large stem segments of Acer Saccharinum L
    Plant Cell Tissue and Organ Culture (PCTOC), 2009
    Co-Authors: Katayoun Mansouri, John E. Preece
    Abstract:

    Benzyladenine (BA) and/or gibberellic acid (GA3) were applied in 20% white exterior latex paint separately at 0, 0.3, 1, 3, 10, or 30 mM; and at 1, 10, or 30 mM of each plant growth regulator (PGR) in a 3 × 3 factorial to 40 cm long stem segments of Acer Saccharinum L. Softwood shoots were forced from these stem segments at various times of the year in a greenhouse and in a laboratory, these resulting shoots were surface disinfested and used as explants in vitro on Driver and Kuniyuki Walnut medium with 0 or 0.01 μM thidiazuron (TDZ). There was some response to the plant growth regulators applied in paint for shoot production from the stem segments and in vitro. Explants from softwood shoots forced from stems painted with 3 mM BA and cultured on medium with 0.01 μM TDZ produced more shoots than explants taken from softwood shoots forced with other BA concentrations or controls. Callus also grew significantly more on explants from stems treated with 3 mM BA cultured on 0.01 μM TDZ than explants harvested from stems painted with other concentrations of BA excluding 10 mM BA. When stem segments treated with BA plus GA3 were compared as a group to controls, more and longer softwood shoots grew on the stems painted with PGRs when all four runs were pooled (Sept. 2005 through Feb. 2006). Application of PGRs in paint extends the season of production of softwood shoots that may be used as explant materials and their subsequent performance in vitro.

  • The Influence of Plant Growth Regulators on Budbreak and Shoot Growth from Large Stem Segments of Acer Saccharinum L.
    HortScience, 2006
    Co-Authors: Katayoun Mansouri, John E. Preece
    Abstract:

    A factorial combination of gibberellic acid (GA3) and benzyladenine (BA) was applied in 20% white exterior latex paint to large (40 cm long, >2.5 cm diameter) stem segments of Acer Saccharinum L. (silver maple) to determine the effects on forcing new softwood shoots in the greenhouse or laboratory and the subsequent growth of these new shoots in vitro. Stem segments were harvested from 10-year-old field-grown coppice shoots. The GA3/BA-paint mixes were applied to the entire stem segments that were forced in plastic flats filled with 1 perlite: 1 vermiculite (by volume) and watered with care so as not to wet the new softwood shoots. The flats and stem segments were drenched weekly with Zerotol (0.18% H2O2). The softwood shoots were harvested when they were at least 3 cm long. After disinfesting and rinsing, the nodal and shoot tip explants were established aseptically in vitro on DKW medium with no cytokinin or with 10-8M thidiazuron. Coppice shoots were harvested, cut, and painted on 9 Sept., 28 Oct., and 12 Dec. 2005. Although there were no significant differences in shoot production among stem segments painted with various combinations of GA3/BA, stems treated with plant growth regulators produced a mean of 2.7, 1.8, or 0.5 shoots for the three harvest dates compared to 0.5, 0.0, or 0.25 shoots on control stem segments. It is well-known that shoot forcing is poor from September through January; however, use of GA3/BA resulted in growth of dormant epicormic shoots. Shoot tip explants produced the most shoots in vitro after 8 weeks if they were harvested from stem segments treated with 0.03 mM GA3, whereas nodal explants produced the most shoots if harvested from segments that had been treated with 0.01 mM GA3.

  • POPULATION VARIATION IN LOW-TEMPERATURE TOLERANCE OF Acer Saccharinum
    HortScience, 1995
    Co-Authors: Paul E. Cappiello, John E. Preece
    Abstract:

    A single clone of Acer Saccharinum was selected and propagated from each of 15 provenances across the plant native range. The clones were field grown in Carbondale, Ill., during the study period. Plants were sampled during Winter 1992-93 and 1993-94 and assayed for low-temptemperature tolerance. During both winters, plants exhibited greatest variation in tolerance around the November and April sampling dates. In midwinter, there was little variation observed and 13 of 15 clones were tolerant to at least -40C. The relationship among Acer Saccharinum provenance and cold tolerance curves will be discussed.

Noriaki Murakami – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Ikuyo Saeki, Christopher W Dick, Burton V Barnes, Noriaki Murakami
    Abstract:

    Comparative phylogeography of red maple (Acer rubrum L.) and silver maple (Acer Saccharinum L.): impacts of habitat specialization, hybridization and glacial histor

  • comparative phylogeography of red maple Acer rubrum l and silver maple Acer Saccharinum l impacts of habitat specialization hybridization and glacial history
    Journal of Biogeography, 2011
    Co-Authors: Ikuyo Saeki, Christopher W Dick, Burton V Barnes, Noriaki Murakami
    Abstract:

    Aim  We analysed variation in chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) in red maple (Acer rubrum L.) and silver maple (Acer Saccharinum L.) across a large part of their geographic ranges. Acer rubrum is one of the most common and morphologically variable deciduous trees of eastern North America, while its sister species A. Saccharinum has a more restricted habitat distribution and displays markedly less morphological variation. Our objective was to infer the impact of biogeographic history on cpDNA diversity and phylogeographic structure in both species. Location  Deciduous forests of eastern North America. Methods  We sequenced 1289 to 1645 bp of non-coding cpDNA from A. rubrum (n = 258) and A. Saccharinum (n = 83). Maximum parsimony networks and spatial analysis of molecular variance (SAMOVA) were used to analyse phylogeographic structure. Rarefaction analyses were used to compare genetic diversity. Results  A total of 40 cpDNA haplotypes were recovered from A. rubrum (38 haplotypes) and A. Saccharinum (7 haplotypes). Five of the seven A. Saccharinum haplotypes were shared with nearby samples of A. rubrum. SAMOVA recovered four phylogeographic groups for A. rubrum in: (1) south-eastern USA, (2) the Gulf and south-eastern Coastal Plain, (3) the lower Mississippi River Valley, and (4) the central and northern regions of eastern North America. Acer Saccharinum had significantly lower haplotype diversity than A. rubrum, and novel haplotypes in post-glaciated northern limits of its range were shared with A. rubrum. Main conclusions  This is the first study of A. rubrum to report a distinct phylogeographic group centred on the lower Mississippi River, and the first to examine data comparatively with A. Saccharinum. We hypothesized that A. rubrum would display stronger phylogeographic structure and greater haplotype diversity than A. Saccharinum because of its greater geographic range, and ecological and morphological variation. This hypothesis was supported by the cpDNA analysis. The sharing of cpDNA and chloroplast simple sequence repeat (cpSSR) haplotypes in areas of geographic overlap provides evidence of introgression, which led to an increase in haplotype diversity in both species, and to novel phylogeographic structure in A. rubrum. We recommend that introgression be considered, along with other potential causes, as an explanation for the phylogeographic structure of cpDNA in plants.

Mier Durante M. Pilar – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Detection of Drepanaphis Acerifoliae (Thomas) [Hemiptera: Aphididae: Drepanosiphinae] Sugar maple trees, Acer Saccharinum, in Spain
    Sociedad Entomológica Aragonesa, 2008
    Co-Authors: Pérez Hidalgo Nicolás, Pons Domènech I Xavier, Mier Durante M. Pilar
    Abstract:

    The nearctic species Drepanaphis Acerifoliae (Thomas) is reported for the first time in the Iberian Peninsula, on sugar maple trees (Acer Saccharinum) used in landscape gardening. The species, already known in Europe (Italy), was detected in Lleida, Spain, in 2006 and in two localities in León province in 2007, where abundant colonies were causing problems due to the honeydew they excreted. Metric and meristic data on the alatae viviparous females and sexuals (oviparous females and males) are given

  • Detection of Drepanaphis Acerifoliae (Thomas) [Hemiptera: Aphididae: Drepanosiphinae] Sugar maple trees, Acer Saccharinum, in Spain
    Sociedad Entomológica Aragonesa, 2008
    Co-Authors: Pérez Hidalgo Nicolás, Pons Domènech I Xavier, Mier Durante M. Pilar
    Abstract:

    The nearctic species Drepanaphis Acerifoliae (Thomas) is reported for the first time in the Iberian Peninsula, on sugar maple trees (Acer Saccharinum) used in landscape gardening. The species, already known in Europe (Italy), was detected in Lleida, Spain, in 2006 and in two localities in León province in 2007, where abundant colonies were causing problems due to the honeydew they excreted. Metric and meristic data on the alatae viviparous females and sexuals (oviparous females and males) are given.This paper was written within the framework of the Iberian Fauna project: Aphidinae (Hemiptera: Aphididae), 3: segunda parte de la tribu Macrosiphini, funded by the Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia (CGL2004-04680-C10-04/BOS

Katayoun Mansouri – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The influence of plant growth regulators on explant performance, bud break, and shoot growth from large stem segments of Acer Saccharinum L
    Plant Cell Tissue and Organ Culture (PCTOC), 2009
    Co-Authors: Katayoun Mansouri, John E. Preece
    Abstract:

    Benzyladenine (BA) and/or gibberellic acid (GA3) were applied in 20% white exterior latex paint separately at 0, 0.3, 1, 3, 10, or 30 mM; and at 1, 10, or 30 mM of each plant growth regulator (PGR) in a 3 × 3 factorial to 40 cm long stem segments of Acer Saccharinum L. Softwood shoots were forced from these stem segments at various times of the year in a greenhouse and in a laboratory, these resulting shoots were surface disinfested and used as explants in vitro on Driver and Kuniyuki Walnut medium with 0 or 0.01 μM thidiazuron (TDZ). There was some response to the plant growth regulators applied in paint for shoot production from the stem segments and in vitro. Explants from softwood shoots forced from stems painted with 3 mM BA and cultured on medium with 0.01 μM TDZ produced more shoots than explants taken from softwood shoots forced with other BA concentrations or controls. Callus also grew significantly more on explants from stems treated with 3 mM BA cultured on 0.01 μM TDZ than explants harvested from stems painted with other concentrations of BA excluding 10 mM BA. When stem segments treated with BA plus GA3 were compared as a group to controls, more and longer softwood shoots grew on the stems painted with PGRs when all four runs were pooled (Sept. 2005 through Feb. 2006). Application of PGRs in paint extends the season of production of softwood shoots that may be used as explant materials and their subsequent performance in vitro.

  • The Influence of Plant Growth Regulators on Budbreak and Shoot Growth from Large Stem Segments of Acer Saccharinum L.
    HortScience, 2006
    Co-Authors: Katayoun Mansouri, John E. Preece
    Abstract:

    A factorial combination of gibberellic acid (GA3) and benzyladenine (BA) was applied in 20% white exterior latex paint to large (40 cm long, >2.5 cm diameter) stem segments of Acer Saccharinum L. (silver maple) to determine the effects on forcing new softwood shoots in the greenhouse or laboratory and the subsequent growth of these new shoots in vitro. Stem segments were harvested from 10-year-old field-grown coppice shoots. The GA3/BA-paint mixes were applied to the entire stem segments that were forced in plastic flats filled with 1 perlite: 1 vermiculite (by volume) and watered with care so as not to wet the new softwood shoots. The flats and stem segments were drenched weekly with Zerotol (0.18% H2O2). The softwood shoots were harvested when they were at least 3 cm long. After disinfesting and rinsing, the nodal and shoot tip explants were established aseptically in vitro on DKW medium with no cytokinin or with 10-8M thidiazuron. Coppice shoots were harvested, cut, and painted on 9 Sept., 28 Oct., and 12 Dec. 2005. Although there were no significant differences in shoot production among stem segments painted with various combinations of GA3/BA, stems treated with plant growth regulators produced a mean of 2.7, 1.8, or 0.5 shoots for the three harvest dates compared to 0.5, 0.0, or 0.25 shoots on control stem segments. It is well-known that shoot forcing is poor from September through January; however, use of GA3/BA resulted in growth of dormant epicormic shoots. Shoot tip explants produced the most shoots in vitro after 8 weeks if they were harvested from stem segments treated with 0.03 mM GA3, whereas nodal explants produced the most shoots if harvested from segments that had been treated with 0.01 mM GA3.

Ikuyo Saeki – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Ikuyo Saeki, Christopher W Dick, Burton V Barnes, Noriaki Murakami
    Abstract:

    Comparative phylogeography of red maple (Acer rubrum L.) and silver maple (Acer Saccharinum L.): impacts of habitat specialization, hybridization and glacial histor

  • comparative phylogeography of red maple Acer rubrum l and silver maple Acer Saccharinum l impacts of habitat specialization hybridization and glacial history
    Journal of Biogeography, 2011
    Co-Authors: Ikuyo Saeki, Christopher W Dick, Burton V Barnes, Noriaki Murakami
    Abstract:

    Aim  We analysed variation in chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) in red maple (Acer rubrum L.) and silver maple (Acer Saccharinum L.) across a large part of their geographic ranges. Acer rubrum is one of the most common and morphologically variable deciduous trees of eastern North America, while its sister species A. Saccharinum has a more restricted habitat distribution and displays markedly less morphological variation. Our objective was to infer the impact of biogeographic history on cpDNA diversity and phylogeographic structure in both species. Location  Deciduous forests of eastern North America. Methods  We sequenced 1289 to 1645 bp of non-coding cpDNA from A. rubrum (n = 258) and A. Saccharinum (n = 83). Maximum parsimony networks and spatial analysis of molecular variance (SAMOVA) were used to analyse phylogeographic structure. Rarefaction analyses were used to compare genetic diversity. Results  A total of 40 cpDNA haplotypes were recovered from A. rubrum (38 haplotypes) and A. Saccharinum (7 haplotypes). Five of the seven A. Saccharinum haplotypes were shared with nearby samples of A. rubrum. SAMOVA recovered four phylogeographic groups for A. rubrum in: (1) south-eastern USA, (2) the Gulf and south-eastern Coastal Plain, (3) the lower Mississippi River Valley, and (4) the central and northern regions of eastern North America. Acer Saccharinum had significantly lower haplotype diversity than A. rubrum, and novel haplotypes in post-glaciated northern limits of its range were shared with A. rubrum. Main conclusions  This is the first study of A. rubrum to report a distinct phylogeographic group centred on the lower Mississippi River, and the first to examine data comparatively with A. Saccharinum. We hypothesized that A. rubrum would display stronger phylogeographic structure and greater haplotype diversity than A. Saccharinum because of its greater geographic range, and ecological and morphological variation. This hypothesis was supported by the cpDNA analysis. The sharing of cpDNA and chloroplast simple sequence repeat (cpSSR) haplotypes in areas of geographic overlap provides evidence of introgression, which led to an increase in haplotype diversity in both species, and to novel phylogeographic structure in A. rubrum. We recommend that introgression be considered, along with other potential causes, as an explanation for the phylogeographic structure of cpDNA in plants.