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Acetabulum Fracture

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Peter J Nowotarski – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • posterior wall Acetabulum Fracture dislocation with subsequent ipsilateral pipkin iv Fracture dislocation how many hits can a hip take
    Trauma Case Reports, 2015
    Co-Authors: Jonathan R Helms, Peter J Nowotarski

    Abstract:

    The treatment of Acetabulum Fractures is a technically-demanding task for orthopaedic trauma surgeons. The treatment of femoral head Fractures associated with Acetabulum Fractures, pipkin IV Fractures, presents difficulty as usually the femoral head Fracture requires treatment through an anterior approach and the Acetabulum Fracture, which is commonly a posterior wall Fracture, requires treatment through a posterior approach. Recently, surgical dislocation of the hip has become an accepted option for treatment of these Fractures as it allows treatment of the femoral head Fracture and posterior wall Acetabulum Fracture through one approach. However, dual anterior and posterior approaches are acceptable. We present 15 year follow up of an 18 year old female who underwent open reduction internal fixation of a posterior wall Acetabulum Fracture through a Kocher–Langenbeck approach. Four months later the patient sustained a second Fracture dislocation of the same hip, this time a femoral head Fracture with an associated posterior wall Acetabulum Fracture that was treated with a Kocher–Langenbeck approach for the revision Acetabulum and a approach for the femoral head Fracture. At fifteen years the patient had a Merle d’Aubigne score of 15 and a Harris hip score of 71. She was gainfully employed and subjectively happy with her surgical result. While treatment of pipkin IV Fracture dislocations can be treated through a surgical dislocation of the hip, dual surgical approaches are a viable option in certain cases.

  • Posterior wall Acetabulum Fracture–dislocation with subsequent ipsilateral pipkin IV Fracture–dislocation: How many hits can a hip take?
    Trauma Case Reports, 2015
    Co-Authors: Jonathan R Helms, Peter J Nowotarski

    Abstract:

    The treatment of Acetabulum Fractures is a technically-demanding task for orthopaedic trauma surgeons. The treatment of femoral head Fractures associated with Acetabulum Fractures, pipkin IV Fractures, presents difficulty as usually the femoral head Fracture requires treatment through an anterior approach and the Acetabulum Fracture, which is commonly a posterior wall Fracture, requires treatment through a posterior approach. Recently, surgical dislocation of the hip has become an accepted option for treatment of these Fractures as it allows treatment of the femoral head Fracture and posterior wall Acetabulum Fracture through one approach. However, dual anterior and posterior approaches are acceptable. We present 15 year follow up of an 18 year old female who underwent open reduction internal fixation of a posterior wall Acetabulum Fracture through a Kocher–Langenbeck approach. Four months later the patient sustained a second Fracture dislocation of the same hip, this time a femoral head Fracture with an associated posterior wall Acetabulum Fracture that was treated with a Kocher–Langenbeck approach for the revision Acetabulum and a approach for the femoral head Fracture. At fifteen years the patient had a Merle d’Aubigne score of 15 and a Harris hip score of 71. She was gainfully employed and subjectively happy with her surgical result. While treatment of pipkin IV Fracture dislocations can be treated through a surgical dislocation of the hip, dual surgical approaches are a viable option in certain cases.

Jonathan R Helms – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • posterior wall Acetabulum Fracture dislocation with subsequent ipsilateral pipkin iv Fracture dislocation how many hits can a hip take
    Trauma Case Reports, 2015
    Co-Authors: Jonathan R Helms, Peter J Nowotarski

    Abstract:

    The treatment of Acetabulum Fractures is a technically-demanding task for orthopaedic trauma surgeons. The treatment of femoral head Fractures associated with Acetabulum Fractures, pipkin IV Fractures, presents difficulty as usually the femoral head Fracture requires treatment through an anterior approach and the Acetabulum Fracture, which is commonly a posterior wall Fracture, requires treatment through a posterior approach. Recently, surgical dislocation of the hip has become an accepted option for treatment of these Fractures as it allows treatment of the femoral head Fracture and posterior wall Acetabulum Fracture through one approach. However, dual anterior and posterior approaches are acceptable. We present 15 year follow up of an 18 year old female who underwent open reduction internal fixation of a posterior wall Acetabulum Fracture through a Kocher–Langenbeck approach. Four months later the patient sustained a second Fracture dislocation of the same hip, this time a femoral head Fracture with an associated posterior wall Acetabulum Fracture that was treated with a Kocher–Langenbeck approach for the revision Acetabulum and a approach for the femoral head Fracture. At fifteen years the patient had a Merle d’Aubigne score of 15 and a Harris hip score of 71. She was gainfully employed and subjectively happy with her surgical result. While treatment of pipkin IV Fracture dislocations can be treated through a surgical dislocation of the hip, dual surgical approaches are a viable option in certain cases.

  • Posterior wall Acetabulum Fracture–dislocation with subsequent ipsilateral pipkin IV Fracture–dislocation: How many hits can a hip take?
    Trauma Case Reports, 2015
    Co-Authors: Jonathan R Helms, Peter J Nowotarski

    Abstract:

    The treatment of Acetabulum Fractures is a technically-demanding task for orthopaedic trauma surgeons. The treatment of femoral head Fractures associated with Acetabulum Fractures, pipkin IV Fractures, presents difficulty as usually the femoral head Fracture requires treatment through an anterior approach and the Acetabulum Fracture, which is commonly a posterior wall Fracture, requires treatment through a posterior approach. Recently, surgical dislocation of the hip has become an accepted option for treatment of these Fractures as it allows treatment of the femoral head Fracture and posterior wall Acetabulum Fracture through one approach. However, dual anterior and posterior approaches are acceptable. We present 15 year follow up of an 18 year old female who underwent open reduction internal fixation of a posterior wall Acetabulum Fracture through a Kocher–Langenbeck approach. Four months later the patient sustained a second Fracture dislocation of the same hip, this time a femoral head Fracture with an associated posterior wall Acetabulum Fracture that was treated with a Kocher–Langenbeck approach for the revision Acetabulum and a approach for the femoral head Fracture. At fifteen years the patient had a Merle d’Aubigne score of 15 and a Harris hip score of 71. She was gainfully employed and subjectively happy with her surgical result. While treatment of pipkin IV Fracture dislocations can be treated through a surgical dislocation of the hip, dual surgical approaches are a viable option in certain cases.

Peter V Giannoudis – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • unique combination of lumbosacral junction injury with open pelvic ring disruption and Acetabulum Fracture case report
    Spine, 2005
    Co-Authors: C Papakostidis, Paul Harwood, Rozalia Dimitriou, Robert Dunsmuir, Peter Millner, Peter V Giannoudis

    Abstract:

    STUDY DESIGN: A case report of a complex spondylo-pelvic injury combining a traumatic spondylolysis and burst Fracture of the fifth lumbar vertebra, with an open pelvic ring disruption and a Fracture of the Acetabulum. OBJECTIVES: To describe the mechanism, diagnostic approach, and rationale for treatment of this very rare and complex injury pattern, and finally to present the results of the treatment. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Traumatic spondylolysis of the fifth lumbar vertebra is a very uncommon type of injury, with few cases being reported in the literature. Combination of such an injury with pelvic ring and acetabular Fractures has never been reported in the past. METHODS: The patient was referred to our institution for definitive treatment after initial treatment at a local hospital involving laparotomy, defunctioning colostomy, and symphyseal plating. Accurate delineation of the complex injury pattern was established on computerized tomography with 3-dimensional multiplanar reconstruction, and magnetic resonance imaging of both the spine and pelvis. Definitive stabilization of the injury was made by posterior lumbopelvic segmental fixation with posterolateral fusion and open reduction and internal fixation of the acetabular Fracture. RESULTS: At 2 years after surgery, the patient was ambulatory, with an ankle-foot orthosis, and almost completely pain free. He was able to perform manual work. CONCLUSIONS: Complex associated injuries of the spondylo-pelvic junction and pelvis are always a challenge to treat because they demand careful assessment, stabilization of the patient, meticulous imaging, and a multidisciplinary approach.