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The Experts below are selected from a list of 261 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Roger Frech – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • ion transport with charge protected and non charge protected cations using the compensated arrhenius formalism part 2 relationship between ionic conductivity and diffusion
    Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 2012
    Co-Authors: Matt Petrowsky, Allison M Fleshman, Dharshani N Bopege, Roger Frech

    Abstract:

    Temperature-dependent ionic conductivities and cation/anion self-diffusion coefficients are measured for four electrolyte families: TbaTf-linear primary alcohols, LiTf-linear primary alcohols, TbaTf-n-alkyl Acetates, and LiTf-n-alkyl Acetates. The Nernst–Einstein equation does not adequately describe the data. Instead, the compensated Arrhenius formalism is applied to both conductivity and diffusion data. General trends based on temperature and alkyl chain length are observed when conductivity is plotted against cation or anion diffusion coefficient, but there is no clear pattern to the data. However, plotting conductivity exponential prefactors against those for diffusion results in four distinct curves, one each for the alcohol and Acetate families described above. Furthermore, the TbaTf-alcohol and TbaTf-Acetate data are “in line” with each other. The conductivity prefactors for the LiTf-alcohol data are smaller than those for the TbaTf data. The LiTf-Acetate data have the lowest conductivity prefactor…

  • ion transport with charge protected and non charge protected cations using the compensated arrhenius formalism part 2 relationship between ionic conductivity and diffusion
    The Journal of Physical Chemistry, 2012
    Co-Authors: Matt Petrowsky, Allison M Fleshman, Dharshani N Bopege, Roger Frech

    Abstract:

    Temperature-dependent ionic conductivities and cation/anion self-diffusion coefficients are measured for four electrolyte families: TbaTf-linear primary alcohols, LiTf-linear primary alcohols, TbaTf-n-alkyl Acetates, and LiTf-n-alkyl Acetates. The Nernst–Einstein equation does not adequately describe the data. Instead, the compensated Arrhenius formalism is applied to both conductivity and diffusion data. General trends based on temperature and alkyl chain length are observed when conductivity is plotted against cation or anion diffusion coefficient, but there is no clear pattern to the data. However, plotting conductivity exponential prefactors against those for diffusion results in four distinct curves, one each for the alcohol and Acetate families described above. Furthermore, the TbaTf-alcohol and TbaTf-Acetate data are “in line” with each other. The conductivity prefactors for the LiTf-alcohol data are smaller than those for the TbaTf data. The LiTf-Acetate data have the lowest conductivity prefactors. This trend in prefactors mirrors the observed trend in degree of ionic association for these electrolytes.

Matt Petrowsky – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • ion transport with charge protected and non charge protected cations using the compensated arrhenius formalism part 2 relationship between ionic conductivity and diffusion
    Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 2012
    Co-Authors: Matt Petrowsky, Allison M Fleshman, Dharshani N Bopege, Roger Frech

    Abstract:

    Temperature-dependent ionic conductivities and cation/anion self-diffusion coefficients are measured for four electrolyte families: TbaTf-linear primary alcohols, LiTf-linear primary alcohols, TbaTf-n-alkyl Acetates, and LiTf-n-alkyl Acetates. The Nernst–Einstein equation does not adequately describe the data. Instead, the compensated Arrhenius formalism is applied to both conductivity and diffusion data. General trends based on temperature and alkyl chain length are observed when conductivity is plotted against cation or anion diffusion coefficient, but there is no clear pattern to the data. However, plotting conductivity exponential prefactors against those for diffusion results in four distinct curves, one each for the alcohol and Acetate families described above. Furthermore, the TbaTf-alcohol and TbaTf-Acetate data are “in line” with each other. The conductivity prefactors for the LiTf-alcohol data are smaller than those for the TbaTf data. The LiTf-Acetate data have the lowest conductivity prefactor…

  • ion transport with charge protected and non charge protected cations using the compensated arrhenius formalism part 2 relationship between ionic conductivity and diffusion
    The Journal of Physical Chemistry, 2012
    Co-Authors: Matt Petrowsky, Allison M Fleshman, Dharshani N Bopege, Roger Frech

    Abstract:

    Temperature-dependent ionic conductivities and cation/anion self-diffusion coefficients are measured for four electrolyte families: TbaTf-linear primary alcohols, LiTf-linear primary alcohols, TbaTf-n-alkyl Acetates, and LiTf-n-alkyl Acetates. The Nernst–Einstein equation does not adequately describe the data. Instead, the compensated Arrhenius formalism is applied to both conductivity and diffusion data. General trends based on temperature and alkyl chain length are observed when conductivity is plotted against cation or anion diffusion coefficient, but there is no clear pattern to the data. However, plotting conductivity exponential prefactors against those for diffusion results in four distinct curves, one each for the alcohol and Acetate families described above. Furthermore, the TbaTf-alcohol and TbaTf-Acetate data are “in line” with each other. The conductivity prefactors for the LiTf-alcohol data are smaller than those for the TbaTf data. The LiTf-Acetate data have the lowest conductivity prefactors. This trend in prefactors mirrors the observed trend in degree of ionic association for these electrolytes.

Allison M Fleshman – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • ion transport with charge protected and non charge protected cations using the compensated arrhenius formalism part 2 relationship between ionic conductivity and diffusion
    Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 2012
    Co-Authors: Matt Petrowsky, Allison M Fleshman, Dharshani N Bopege, Roger Frech

    Abstract:

    Temperature-dependent ionic conductivities and cation/anion self-diffusion coefficients are measured for four electrolyte families: TbaTf-linear primary alcohols, LiTf-linear primary alcohols, TbaTf-n-alkyl Acetates, and LiTf-n-alkyl Acetates. The Nernst–Einstein equation does not adequately describe the data. Instead, the compensated Arrhenius formalism is applied to both conductivity and diffusion data. General trends based on temperature and alkyl chain length are observed when conductivity is plotted against cation or anion diffusion coefficient, but there is no clear pattern to the data. However, plotting conductivity exponential prefactors against those for diffusion results in four distinct curves, one each for the alcohol and Acetate families described above. Furthermore, the TbaTf-alcohol and TbaTf-Acetate data are “in line” with each other. The conductivity prefactors for the LiTf-alcohol data are smaller than those for the TbaTf data. The LiTf-Acetate data have the lowest conductivity prefactor…

  • ion transport with charge protected and non charge protected cations using the compensated arrhenius formalism part 2 relationship between ionic conductivity and diffusion
    The Journal of Physical Chemistry, 2012
    Co-Authors: Matt Petrowsky, Allison M Fleshman, Dharshani N Bopege, Roger Frech

    Abstract:

    Temperature-dependent ionic conductivities and cation/anion self-diffusion coefficients are measured for four electrolyte families: TbaTf-linear primary alcohols, LiTf-linear primary alcohols, TbaTf-n-alkyl Acetates, and LiTf-n-alkyl Acetates. The Nernst–Einstein equation does not adequately describe the data. Instead, the compensated Arrhenius formalism is applied to both conductivity and diffusion data. General trends based on temperature and alkyl chain length are observed when conductivity is plotted against cation or anion diffusion coefficient, but there is no clear pattern to the data. However, plotting conductivity exponential prefactors against those for diffusion results in four distinct curves, one each for the alcohol and Acetate families described above. Furthermore, the TbaTf-alcohol and TbaTf-Acetate data are “in line” with each other. The conductivity prefactors for the LiTf-alcohol data are smaller than those for the TbaTf data. The LiTf-Acetate data have the lowest conductivity prefactors. This trend in prefactors mirrors the observed trend in degree of ionic association for these electrolytes.