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Wiebke Bleidorn – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • hitting the road to adulthood short term personality development during a major life transition
    Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 2012
    Co-Authors: Wiebke Bleidorn

    Abstract:

    Previous research suggests that normative life transitions have the potential to trigger personality maturation. But what exactly happens during such a transitional stage? The present study examined personality trait changes in a sample of 910 German high school students during their transition from school to adult life. Despite the short observation period of three semiannual measurements, growth curve analyses revealed significant mean-level changes in personality traits. These changes occurred primarily in a positive direction, were strongest for the trait of conscientiousness, and most pronounced in those students who were directly confronted with this transitional experience. Bivariate growth curve models indicated that individual differences in personality change were substantially associated with changes in students’ investments into Achievement Behavior. Supporting socioanalytic perspectives on personality development, these findings can be discussed with respect to process approaches to personality change assuming that consistent Behavioral changes might lead to personality change in a bottom-up fashion.

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Dale H. Schunk – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Coming to Terms with Motivation Constructs.
    Contemporary Educational Psychology, 2000
    Co-Authors: Dale H. Schunk

    Abstract:

    The field of motivation is beset with a lack of clear definition of motivational constructs and specification of their operation within larger theoretical frameworks. These problems have implications for interpretation of research results and applications to practice. The articles in this collection represent an important step in attaining greater clarity. Future research should be directed toward clarifying conditions under which motivational constructs predict Achievement Behavior, delineating the role of social processes in motivation, and exploring long-term motivation in the face of obstacles and competing demands.

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  • Social-self interaction and Achievement Behavior
    Educational Psychologist, 1999
    Co-Authors: Dale H. Schunk

    Abstract:

    This article describes a dynamic model of Achievement in which social influences are internalized and used self-regulatively by learners. The conceptual focus is social cognitive theory with emphasis on triadic reciprocality and phases of self-regulatory development. Social (instructional) factors, self (personal) influences, and Achievement outcomes (Behaviors) reciprocally interact during learning; the direction and strength of reciprocal influence will vary due to level of skill acquisition and phase of self-regulatory development. Research is summarized on social modeling, self-verbalization, and goals with progress feedback; each involves social transmittal of skills and strategies and a means for learner internalization. The social cognitive perspective is contrasted with other theoretical views that highlight the role of the social environment in learning. This article concludes with suggestions for future research.

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  • Implicit Theories and Achievement Behavior
    Psychological Inquiry, 1995
    Co-Authors: Dale H. Schunk

    Abstract:

    It is a pleasure to comment on Dweck, Chiu, and Hong’s target article. Like so many of Dweck’s earlier works, this article makes a substantive contribution to the psychological literature on the role of self-perceptions in Behavior. The article summarizes much research on the operation of implicit theories. The theoretical framework is well presented, and the research evidence is impressive.
    In this commentary, I discuss the theory and research on implicit theories and raise some issues of concern. I conclude with some suggested directions for future research. To focus my discussion, I concentrate on the role of implicit theories in Achievement Behavior.

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Jonathan Metzler – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Gender differences in fear of success: A preliminary validation of the Performance Success Threat Appraisal Inventory
    Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 2011
    Co-Authors: Nathalie André, Jonathan Metzler

    Abstract:

    Objectives The present study was designed to examine the usefulness of the Performance Success Threat Appraisal Inventory (PSTAI; Metzler & Conroy, 2007) to assess fear of success in male and female elite athletes and its relationships with Achievement goal orientations. Introduced originally to explain gender differences in Achievement Behavior, we verify the usefulness of fear of success (FS) in sport domain by using the emotionally-based definition of FS proposed by Metzler and Conroy (2007), which is operationalized as belief strengths regarding aversive successes that predispose individuals to appraise success as threatening. Methods Three studies, involving 668 athletes, were designed to assess the multidimensionality of FS, the relationships between FS and personality variable such as anxiety, and the relationships between FS and Achievement goals. Results Component factorial analysis provided structural validity of the PSTAI and Pearson correlations supported the compromise hypothesis developed by Hyland (1989). Males who scored high on FS reported high somatic anxiety, worry, concentration disruption, preoccupation with rewards, and a tendency to suffer a lack of freedom in their relations with others. Regression analysis showed that FS males were predisposed to pursue mastery-avoidance goals. FS was not correlated with anxiety for females. Conclusions Evidence of the multidimensional structure of the PSTAI was obtained. Consistent with theoretical predictions, elite athletes are interested by mastery approach and they tend to report fear concerning their capabilities to progress, despite effort.

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