Achievement Testing - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Achievement Testing

The Experts below are selected from a list of 201 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Achievement Testing – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Linda Wirthwein – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • subjective well being test anxiety academic Achievement Testing for reciprocal effects
    Frontiers in Psychology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Ricarda Steinmayr, Julia Crede, Nele Mcelvany, Linda Wirthwein
    Abstract:

    In the context of adolescents’ subjective well-being (SWB), research has recently focused on a number of different school variables. The direction of the relationships between adolescents’ SWB, academic Achievement, and test anxiety is, however, still open although reciprocal causation has been hypothesized. The present study set out to investigate to what extent SWB, academic Achievement, and test anxiety influence each other over time. A sample of N = 290 11th grade students (n = 138 female; age: M = 16.54 years, SD = 0.57) completed measures of SWB and test anxiety in the time span of 1 year. Grade point average (GPA) indicated students’ academic Achievement. We analyzed the reciprocal relations using cross-lagged structural equation modeling. The model fit was satisfactory for all computed models. Results indicated that the worry component of test anxiety negatively and GPA positively predicted changes in the cognitive component of SWB (life satisfaction). Worry also negatively predicted changes in the affective component of SWB. Moreover, worry negatively predicted changes in students’ GPA. Directions for future research and the differential predictive influences of academic Achievement and test anxiety on adolescents’ SWB are discussed with regard to potential underlying processes.

  • subjective well being test anxiety academic Achievement Testing for reciprocal effects
    Frontiers in Psychology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Ricarda Steinmayr, Julia Crede, Nele Mcelvany, Linda Wirthwein
    Abstract:

    In the context of adolescents’ subjective well-being (SWB), research has recently focused on a number of different school variables. The direction of the relationships between adolescents’ SWB, academic Achievement, and test anxiety is however still open although reciprocal causation has been hypothesized. The present study set out to investigate to what extent SWB, academic Achievement, and test anxiety influence each other over time. A sample of N = 290 11th grade students (n = 138 female; age: M = 16.54 years, SD = 0.57) completed measures of SWB and test anxiety in the time span of one year. Grade Point Average (GPA) indicated students’ academic Achievement. We analyzed the reciprocal relations using cross-lagged structural equation modeling. The model fit was satisfactory for all computed models. Results indicated that the worry component of test anxiety negatively and GPA positively predicted changes in the cognitive component of SWB (life satisfaction). Worry also negatively predicted changes in the affective component of SWB. Moreover, worry negatively predicted changes in students’ GPA. Directions for future research and the differential predictive influences of academic Achievement and test anxiety on adolescents’ SWB are discussed with regard to potential underlying processes.

Ricarda Steinmayr – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • subjective well being test anxiety academic Achievement Testing for reciprocal effects
    Frontiers in Psychology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Ricarda Steinmayr, Julia Crede, Nele Mcelvany, Linda Wirthwein
    Abstract:

    In the context of adolescents’ subjective well-being (SWB), research has recently focused on a number of different school variables. The direction of the relationships between adolescents’ SWB, academic Achievement, and test anxiety is, however, still open although reciprocal causation has been hypothesized. The present study set out to investigate to what extent SWB, academic Achievement, and test anxiety influence each other over time. A sample of N = 290 11th grade students (n = 138 female; age: M = 16.54 years, SD = 0.57) completed measures of SWB and test anxiety in the time span of 1 year. Grade point average (GPA) indicated students’ academic Achievement. We analyzed the reciprocal relations using cross-lagged structural equation modeling. The model fit was satisfactory for all computed models. Results indicated that the worry component of test anxiety negatively and GPA positively predicted changes in the cognitive component of SWB (life satisfaction). Worry also negatively predicted changes in the affective component of SWB. Moreover, worry negatively predicted changes in students’ GPA. Directions for future research and the differential predictive influences of academic Achievement and test anxiety on adolescents’ SWB are discussed with regard to potential underlying processes.

  • subjective well being test anxiety academic Achievement Testing for reciprocal effects
    Frontiers in Psychology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Ricarda Steinmayr, Julia Crede, Nele Mcelvany, Linda Wirthwein
    Abstract:

    In the context of adolescents’ subjective well-being (SWB), research has recently focused on a number of different school variables. The direction of the relationships between adolescents’ SWB, academic Achievement, and test anxiety is however still open although reciprocal causation has been hypothesized. The present study set out to investigate to what extent SWB, academic Achievement, and test anxiety influence each other over time. A sample of N = 290 11th grade students (n = 138 female; age: M = 16.54 years, SD = 0.57) completed measures of SWB and test anxiety in the time span of one year. Grade Point Average (GPA) indicated students’ academic Achievement. We analyzed the reciprocal relations using cross-lagged structural equation modeling. The model fit was satisfactory for all computed models. Results indicated that the worry component of test anxiety negatively and GPA positively predicted changes in the cognitive component of SWB (life satisfaction). Worry also negatively predicted changes in the affective component of SWB. Moreover, worry negatively predicted changes in students’ GPA. Directions for future research and the differential predictive influences of academic Achievement and test anxiety on adolescents’ SWB are discussed with regard to potential underlying processes.

Scott G Paris – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Teachers’ Perceptions of Standardized Achievement Tests.
    Educational Policy, 1994
    Co-Authors: Tim Urdan, Scott G Paris
    Abstract:

    As standardized Achievement Testing has increased in frequency and importance over the past few decades, researchers have begun to examine the validity of test scores more closely. The way that tea…

  • a developmental perspective on standardized Achievement Testing
    Educational Researcher, 1991
    Co-Authors: Scott G Paris, Theresa A Lawton, Julianne C Turner, Jodie L Roth
    Abstract:

    Throughout the 1980s there was a proliferation of Achievement Testing in America to promote and assure the effectiveness of educational reforms. However, both traditional innovative forms of assessment failed to consider the cumulative impact of repeated Testing on students” attitudes and motivation. Our surveys of students in Grades 2–11 revealed that by adolescence many students become suspicious and cynical about tests. A large number of students, especially low achievers, become anxious about tests, cheat, try half-heartedly, or use poor test-taking strategies. These reactions may preserve students’ feeling of competence when they receive low test scores, but they undermine the validity of the test scores and discourage genuine learning. A developmental perspective on Testing may prevent students’ counterproductive reactions and may help to guide reforms in educational assessment.

Nele Mcelvany – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • subjective well being test anxiety academic Achievement Testing for reciprocal effects
    Frontiers in Psychology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Ricarda Steinmayr, Julia Crede, Nele Mcelvany, Linda Wirthwein
    Abstract:

    In the context of adolescents’ subjective well-being (SWB), research has recently focused on a number of different school variables. The direction of the relationships between adolescents’ SWB, academic Achievement, and test anxiety is, however, still open although reciprocal causation has been hypothesized. The present study set out to investigate to what extent SWB, academic Achievement, and test anxiety influence each other over time. A sample of N = 290 11th grade students (n = 138 female; age: M = 16.54 years, SD = 0.57) completed measures of SWB and test anxiety in the time span of 1 year. Grade point average (GPA) indicated students’ academic Achievement. We analyzed the reciprocal relations using cross-lagged structural equation modeling. The model fit was satisfactory for all computed models. Results indicated that the worry component of test anxiety negatively and GPA positively predicted changes in the cognitive component of SWB (life satisfaction). Worry also negatively predicted changes in the affective component of SWB. Moreover, worry negatively predicted changes in students’ GPA. Directions for future research and the differential predictive influences of academic Achievement and test anxiety on adolescents’ SWB are discussed with regard to potential underlying processes.

  • subjective well being test anxiety academic Achievement Testing for reciprocal effects
    Frontiers in Psychology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Ricarda Steinmayr, Julia Crede, Nele Mcelvany, Linda Wirthwein
    Abstract:

    In the context of adolescents’ subjective well-being (SWB), research has recently focused on a number of different school variables. The direction of the relationships between adolescents’ SWB, academic Achievement, and test anxiety is however still open although reciprocal causation has been hypothesized. The present study set out to investigate to what extent SWB, academic Achievement, and test anxiety influence each other over time. A sample of N = 290 11th grade students (n = 138 female; age: M = 16.54 years, SD = 0.57) completed measures of SWB and test anxiety in the time span of one year. Grade Point Average (GPA) indicated students’ academic Achievement. We analyzed the reciprocal relations using cross-lagged structural equation modeling. The model fit was satisfactory for all computed models. Results indicated that the worry component of test anxiety negatively and GPA positively predicted changes in the cognitive component of SWB (life satisfaction). Worry also negatively predicted changes in the affective component of SWB. Moreover, worry negatively predicted changes in students’ GPA. Directions for future research and the differential predictive influences of academic Achievement and test anxiety on adolescents’ SWB are discussed with regard to potential underlying processes.

Julia Crede – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • subjective well being test anxiety academic Achievement Testing for reciprocal effects
    Frontiers in Psychology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Ricarda Steinmayr, Julia Crede, Nele Mcelvany, Linda Wirthwein
    Abstract:

    In the context of adolescents’ subjective well-being (SWB), research has recently focused on a number of different school variables. The direction of the relationships between adolescents’ SWB, academic Achievement, and test anxiety is, however, still open although reciprocal causation has been hypothesized. The present study set out to investigate to what extent SWB, academic Achievement, and test anxiety influence each other over time. A sample of N = 290 11th grade students (n = 138 female; age: M = 16.54 years, SD = 0.57) completed measures of SWB and test anxiety in the time span of 1 year. Grade point average (GPA) indicated students’ academic Achievement. We analyzed the reciprocal relations using cross-lagged structural equation modeling. The model fit was satisfactory for all computed models. Results indicated that the worry component of test anxiety negatively and GPA positively predicted changes in the cognitive component of SWB (life satisfaction). Worry also negatively predicted changes in the affective component of SWB. Moreover, worry negatively predicted changes in students’ GPA. Directions for future research and the differential predictive influences of academic Achievement and test anxiety on adolescents’ SWB are discussed with regard to potential underlying processes.

  • subjective well being test anxiety academic Achievement Testing for reciprocal effects
    Frontiers in Psychology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Ricarda Steinmayr, Julia Crede, Nele Mcelvany, Linda Wirthwein
    Abstract:

    In the context of adolescents’ subjective well-being (SWB), research has recently focused on a number of different school variables. The direction of the relationships between adolescents’ SWB, academic Achievement, and test anxiety is however still open although reciprocal causation has been hypothesized. The present study set out to investigate to what extent SWB, academic Achievement, and test anxiety influence each other over time. A sample of N = 290 11th grade students (n = 138 female; age: M = 16.54 years, SD = 0.57) completed measures of SWB and test anxiety in the time span of one year. Grade Point Average (GPA) indicated students’ academic Achievement. We analyzed the reciprocal relations using cross-lagged structural equation modeling. The model fit was satisfactory for all computed models. Results indicated that the worry component of test anxiety negatively and GPA positively predicted changes in the cognitive component of SWB (life satisfaction). Worry also negatively predicted changes in the affective component of SWB. Moreover, worry negatively predicted changes in students’ GPA. Directions for future research and the differential predictive influences of academic Achievement and test anxiety on adolescents’ SWB are discussed with regard to potential underlying processes.