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Acid Rain

The Experts below are selected from a list of 237 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

H M Seip – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Acid Rain in china
    Environmental Science & Technology, 2006
    Co-Authors: Thorjorn Larssen, H M Seip, Espen Lydersen, Dagang Tang, Yi He, Lei Duan, Rolf D Vogt, Jan Mulder, Min Shao, Yanhui Wang

    Abstract:

    Rapid industrialization has put citizens and ecosystems at risk. Acid Rain emerged as an important environmental problem in China in the late 1970s. Many years of record economic growth has been accompanied by increased energy demand, greater coal combustion, and larger emission of pollutants. As a result of significant emissions and subsequent deposition of sulfur, widepsread Acid Rain is observed in southern and southwestern China. In fact, the deposition of sulfur is in some places higher than what was reported from the back triangle in central Europe in the early 1980s. In addition, nitrogen is emitted from agriculture, power production, and a rapidly increasing number of cars. As a result, considerable deposition of pollutants occurs in forested areas previously thought to be pristine. Little is known about the effects of Acid deposition on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in China. In this article, we present the current situation and what to expect in the future, largely on the basis of results from a five-year Chinese-Norwegian cooperative project. In the years ahead, new environmental challenges must be expected if proper countermeasures are not put into place.

  • Acid Rain in europe and the united states an update
    Environmental Science & Policy, 2004
    Co-Authors: Fredric C Menz, H M Seip

    Abstract:

    Abstract This paper discusses the evolution of science and policies to control Acid Rain in Europe and the United States over the past several decades. Acid Rain gained prominence in the late 1960s because of its perceived effects on ecosystem integrity. Extensive research efforts in both Europe and the United States, however, have concluded that the effects of Acid Rain—at least those on terrestrial ecosystems—were less serious than originally believed. More recently, interest in controlling Acid Rain precursors stems primarily from health concerns, particularly their effects in the form of fine particulate matter. The paper discusses the emergence of Acid Rain as an environmental concern, scientific evidence about the effects of Acidic deposition on natural ecosystems, US and European Acid Rain control policies, studies of the costs and benefits of reducing Acid Rain, and different policy contexts in Europe and the United States.

Hao Ran Chang – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The impact of Acid Rain on China’s socioeconomic vulnerability
    Natural Hazards, 2012
    Co-Authors: Yue-jun Zhang, Hao Ran Chang

    Abstract:

    Acid Rain has been a great threat to socioeconomic sustainable development of China; therefore, we develop an indicator system based on the sensitivity and adaptive capacity perspectives and employ the TOPSIS (Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution) approach to investigate the impact of Acid Rain on socioeconomic vulnerability of China. Some empirical findings are obtained. First, there is significant provincial difference of socioeconomic vulnerability caused by Acid Rain in China. Specifically, Tibet, Qinghai, and Shanghai are the top three provinces with the largest vulnerability but Inner Mongolia, Xinjiang, and Jilin are bottom of the rankings. Second, adaptive capacity indicators overall appear more important than sensitivity indicators to measure the vulnerability of Acid Rain, and the most important indicators are population density and output value of agriculture, forestry, animal husbandry, and fishery while GDP per capita ranks the last. Third, upgrading energy structure and reducing outdated capacity in China prove to be effective means to mitigate vulnerability of Acid Rain, which has been validated in Guizhou and Hunan provinces. Finally, great attention should be attached to the population increase so as to curb the Acid Rain vulnerability, especially in Beijing and Tianjin. These results present a basis for future Acid Rain prevention planning and economic development in China.

  • The impact of Acid Rain on China’s socioeconomic vulnerability
    Natural Hazards, 2012
    Co-Authors: Yue-jun Zhang, Hao Ran Chang

    Abstract:

    Acid Rain has been a great threat to socioeconomic sustainable development of China; therefore, we develop an indicator system based on the sensitivity and adaptive capacity perspectives and employ the TOPSIS (Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution) approach to investigate the impact of Acid Rain on socioeconomic vulnerability of China. Some empirical findings are obtained. First, there is significant provincial difference of socioeconomic vulnerability caused by Acid Rain in China. Specifically, Tibet, Qinghai, and Shanghai are the top three provinces with the largest vulnerability but Inner Mongolia, Xinjiang, and Jilin are bottom of the rankings. Second, adaptive capacity indicators overall appear more important than sensitivity indicators to measure the vulnerability of Acid Rain, and the most important indicators are population density and output value of agriculture, forestry, animal husbandry, and fishery while GDP per capita ranks the last. Third, upgrading energy structure and reducing outdated capacity in China prove to be effective means to mitigate vulnerability of Acid Rain, which has been validated in Guizhou and Hunan provinces. Finally, great attention should be attached to the population increase so as to curb the Acid Rain vulnerability, especially in Beijing and Tianjin. These results present a basis for future Acid Rain prevention planning and economic development in China.

Yue-jun Zhang – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The impact of Acid Rain on China’s socioeconomic vulnerability
    Natural Hazards, 2012
    Co-Authors: Yue-jun Zhang, Hao Ran Chang

    Abstract:

    Acid Rain has been a great threat to socioeconomic sustainable development of China; therefore, we develop an indicator system based on the sensitivity and adaptive capacity perspectives and employ the TOPSIS (Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution) approach to investigate the impact of Acid Rain on socioeconomic vulnerability of China. Some empirical findings are obtained. First, there is significant provincial difference of socioeconomic vulnerability caused by Acid Rain in China. Specifically, Tibet, Qinghai, and Shanghai are the top three provinces with the largest vulnerability but Inner Mongolia, Xinjiang, and Jilin are bottom of the rankings. Second, adaptive capacity indicators overall appear more important than sensitivity indicators to measure the vulnerability of Acid Rain, and the most important indicators are population density and output value of agriculture, forestry, animal husbandry, and fishery while GDP per capita ranks the last. Third, upgrading energy structure and reducing outdated capacity in China prove to be effective means to mitigate vulnerability of Acid Rain, which has been validated in Guizhou and Hunan provinces. Finally, great attention should be attached to the population increase so as to curb the Acid Rain vulnerability, especially in Beijing and Tianjin. These results present a basis for future Acid Rain prevention planning and economic development in China.

  • The impact of Acid Rain on China’s socioeconomic vulnerability
    Natural Hazards, 2012
    Co-Authors: Yue-jun Zhang, Hao Ran Chang

    Abstract:

    Acid Rain has been a great threat to socioeconomic sustainable development of China; therefore, we develop an indicator system based on the sensitivity and adaptive capacity perspectives and employ the TOPSIS (Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution) approach to investigate the impact of Acid Rain on socioeconomic vulnerability of China. Some empirical findings are obtained. First, there is significant provincial difference of socioeconomic vulnerability caused by Acid Rain in China. Specifically, Tibet, Qinghai, and Shanghai are the top three provinces with the largest vulnerability but Inner Mongolia, Xinjiang, and Jilin are bottom of the rankings. Second, adaptive capacity indicators overall appear more important than sensitivity indicators to measure the vulnerability of Acid Rain, and the most important indicators are population density and output value of agriculture, forestry, animal husbandry, and fishery while GDP per capita ranks the last. Third, upgrading energy structure and reducing outdated capacity in China prove to be effective means to mitigate vulnerability of Acid Rain, which has been validated in Guizhou and Hunan provinces. Finally, great attention should be attached to the population increase so as to curb the Acid Rain vulnerability, especially in Beijing and Tianjin. These results present a basis for future Acid Rain prevention planning and economic development in China.