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Mateja Lumpert – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Rare tradition of the folk medicinal use of Aconitum spp. is kept alive in Solčavsko, Slovenia
    Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 2017
    Co-Authors: Marija Povšnar, Gordana Koželj, Samo Kreft, Mateja Lumpert
    Abstract:

    Aconitum species are poisonous plants that have been used in Western medicine for centuries. In the nineteenth century, these plants were part of official and folk medicine in the Slovenian territory. According to current ethnobotanical studies, folk use of Aconitum species is rarely reported in Europe. The purpose of this study was to research the folk medicinal use of Aconitum species in Solcavsko, Slovenia; to collect recipes for the preparation of Aconitum spp., indications for use, and dosing; and to investigate whether the folk use of aconite was connected to poisoning incidents. In Solcavsko, a remote alpine area in northern Slovenia, we performed semi-structured interviews with 19 informants in Solcavsko, 3 informants in Luce, and two retired physicians who worked in that area. Three samples of homemade ethanolic extracts were obtained from informants, and the concentration of aconitine was measured. In addition, four extracts were prepared according to reported recipes. All 22 informants knew of Aconitum spp. and their therapeutic use, and 5 of them provided a detailed description of the preparation and use of “voukuc”, an ethanolic extract made from aconite roots. Seven informants were unable to describe the preparation in detail, since they knew of the extract only from the narration of others or they remembered it from childhood. Most likely, the roots of Aconitum tauricum and Aconitum napellus were used for the preparation of the extract, and the solvent was homemade spirits. Four informants kept the extract at home; two extracts were prepared recently (1998 and 2015). Three extracts were analyzed, and 2 contained aconitine. Informants reported many indications for the use of the extract; it was used internally and, in some cases, externally as well. The extract was also used in animals. The extract was measured in drops, but the number of drops differed among the informants. The informants reported nine poisonings with Aconitum spp., but none of them occurred as a result of medicinal use of the extract. In this study, we determined that folk knowledge of the medicinal use of Aconitum spp. is still present in Solcavsko, but Aconitum preparations are used only infrequently.

  • Rare tradition of the folk medicinal use of Aconitum spp. is kept alive in Solčavsko, Slovenia
    Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 2017
    Co-Authors: Marija Povšnar, Gordana Koželj, Samo Kreft, Mateja Lumpert
    Abstract:

    Aconitum species are poisonous plants that have been used in Western medicine for centuries. In the nineteenth century, these plants were part of official and folk medicine in the Slovenian territory. According to current ethnobotanical studies, folk use of Aconitum species is rarely reported in Europe. The purpose of this study was to research the folk medicinal use of Aconitum species in Solcavsko, Slovenia; to collect recipes for the preparation of Aconitum spp., indications for use, and dosing; and to investigate whether the folk use of aconite was connected to poisoning incidents. In Solcavsko, a remote alpine area in northern Slovenia, we performed semi-structured interviews with 19 informants in Solcavsko, 3 informants in Luce, and two retired physicians who worked in that area. Three samples of homemade ethanolic extracts were obtained from informants, and the concentration of aconitine was measured. In addition, four extracts were prepared according to reported recipes. All 22 informants knew of Aconitum spp. and their therapeutic use, and 5 of them provided a detailed description of the preparation and use of “voukuc”, an ethanolic extract made from aconite roots. Seven informants were unable to describe the preparation in detail, since they knew of the extract only from the narration of others or they remembered it from childhood. Most likely, the roots of Aconitum tauricum and Aconitum napellus were used for the preparation of the extract, and the solvent was homemade spirits. Four informants kept the extract at home; two extracts were prepared recently (1998 and 2015). Three extracts were analyzed, and 2 contained aconitine. Informants reported many indications for the use of the extract; it was used internally and, in some cases, externally as well. The extract was also used in animals. The extract was measured in drops, but the number of drops differed among the informants. The informants reported nine poisonings with Aconitum spp., but none of them occurred as a result of medicinal use of the extract. In this study, we determined that folk knowledge of the medicinal use of Aconitum spp. is still present in Solcavsko, but Aconitum preparations are used only infrequently.

  • Rare tradition of the folk medicinal use of Aconitum spp. is kept alive in Solčavsko, Slovenia
    Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 2017
    Co-Authors: Marija Povšnar, Gordana Koželj, Samo Kreft, Mateja Lumpert
    Abstract:

    Background Aconitum species are poisonous plants that have been used in Western medicine for centuries. In the nineteenth century, these plants were part of official and folk medicine in the Slovenian territory. According to current ethnobotanical studies, folk use of Aconitum species is rarely reported in Europe. The purpose of this study was to research the folk medicinal use of Aconitum species in Solčavsko, Slovenia; to collect recipes for the preparation of Aconitum spp., indications for use, and dosing; and to investigate whether the folk use of aconite was connected to poisoning incidents. Methods In Solčavsko, a remote alpine area in northern Slovenia, we performed semi-structured interviews with 19 informants in Solčavsko, 3 informants in Luče, and two retired physicians who worked in that area. Three samples of homemade ethanolic extracts were obtained from informants, and the concentration of aconitine was measured. In addition, four extracts were prepared according to reported recipes. Results All 22 informants knew of Aconitum spp. and their therapeutic use, and 5 of them provided a detailed description of the preparation and use of “voukuc”, an ethanolic extract made from aconite roots. Seven informants were unable to describe the preparation in detail, since they knew of the extract only from the narration of others or they remembered it from childhood. Most likely, the roots of Aconitum tauricum and Aconitum napellus were used for the preparation of the extract, and the solvent was homemade spirits. Four informants kept the extract at home; two extracts were prepared recently (1998 and 2015). Three extracts were analyzed, and 2 contained aconitine. Informants reported many indications for the use of the extract; it was used internally and, in some cases, externally as well. The extract was also used in animals. The extract was measured in drops, but the number of drops differed among the informants. The informants reported nine poisonings with Aconitum spp., but none of them occurred as a result of medicinal use of the extract. Conclusions In this study, we determined that folk knowledge of the medicinal use of Aconitum spp. is still present in Solčavsko, but Aconitum preparations are used only infrequently.

Marija Povšnar – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Rare tradition of the folk medicinal use of Aconitum spp. is kept alive in Solčavsko, Slovenia
    Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 2017
    Co-Authors: Marija Povšnar, Gordana Koželj, Samo Kreft, Mateja Lumpert
    Abstract:

    Aconitum species are poisonous plants that have been used in Western medicine for centuries. In the nineteenth century, these plants were part of official and folk medicine in the Slovenian territory. According to current ethnobotanical studies, folk use of Aconitum species is rarely reported in Europe. The purpose of this study was to research the folk medicinal use of Aconitum species in Solcavsko, Slovenia; to collect recipes for the preparation of Aconitum spp., indications for use, and dosing; and to investigate whether the folk use of aconite was connected to poisoning incidents. In Solcavsko, a remote alpine area in northern Slovenia, we performed semi-structured interviews with 19 informants in Solcavsko, 3 informants in Luce, and two retired physicians who worked in that area. Three samples of homemade ethanolic extracts were obtained from informants, and the concentration of aconitine was measured. In addition, four extracts were prepared according to reported recipes. All 22 informants knew of Aconitum spp. and their therapeutic use, and 5 of them provided a detailed description of the preparation and use of “voukuc”, an ethanolic extract made from aconite roots. Seven informants were unable to describe the preparation in detail, since they knew of the extract only from the narration of others or they remembered it from childhood. Most likely, the roots of Aconitum tauricum and Aconitum napellus were used for the preparation of the extract, and the solvent was homemade spirits. Four informants kept the extract at home; two extracts were prepared recently (1998 and 2015). Three extracts were analyzed, and 2 contained aconitine. Informants reported many indications for the use of the extract; it was used internally and, in some cases, externally as well. The extract was also used in animals. The extract was measured in drops, but the number of drops differed among the informants. The informants reported nine poisonings with Aconitum spp., but none of them occurred as a result of medicinal use of the extract. In this study, we determined that folk knowledge of the medicinal use of Aconitum spp. is still present in Solcavsko, but Aconitum preparations are used only infrequently.

  • Rare tradition of the folk medicinal use of Aconitum spp. is kept alive in Solčavsko, Slovenia
    Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 2017
    Co-Authors: Marija Povšnar, Gordana Koželj, Samo Kreft, Mateja Lumpert
    Abstract:

    Aconitum species are poisonous plants that have been used in Western medicine for centuries. In the nineteenth century, these plants were part of official and folk medicine in the Slovenian territory. According to current ethnobotanical studies, folk use of Aconitum species is rarely reported in Europe. The purpose of this study was to research the folk medicinal use of Aconitum species in Solcavsko, Slovenia; to collect recipes for the preparation of Aconitum spp., indications for use, and dosing; and to investigate whether the folk use of aconite was connected to poisoning incidents. In Solcavsko, a remote alpine area in northern Slovenia, we performed semi-structured interviews with 19 informants in Solcavsko, 3 informants in Luce, and two retired physicians who worked in that area. Three samples of homemade ethanolic extracts were obtained from informants, and the concentration of aconitine was measured. In addition, four extracts were prepared according to reported recipes. All 22 informants knew of Aconitum spp. and their therapeutic use, and 5 of them provided a detailed description of the preparation and use of “voukuc”, an ethanolic extract made from aconite roots. Seven informants were unable to describe the preparation in detail, since they knew of the extract only from the narration of others or they remembered it from childhood. Most likely, the roots of Aconitum tauricum and Aconitum napellus were used for the preparation of the extract, and the solvent was homemade spirits. Four informants kept the extract at home; two extracts were prepared recently (1998 and 2015). Three extracts were analyzed, and 2 contained aconitine. Informants reported many indications for the use of the extract; it was used internally and, in some cases, externally as well. The extract was also used in animals. The extract was measured in drops, but the number of drops differed among the informants. The informants reported nine poisonings with Aconitum spp., but none of them occurred as a result of medicinal use of the extract. In this study, we determined that folk knowledge of the medicinal use of Aconitum spp. is still present in Solcavsko, but Aconitum preparations are used only infrequently.

  • Rare tradition of the folk medicinal use of Aconitum spp. is kept alive in Solčavsko, Slovenia
    Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 2017
    Co-Authors: Marija Povšnar, Gordana Koželj, Samo Kreft, Mateja Lumpert
    Abstract:

    Background Aconitum species are poisonous plants that have been used in Western medicine for centuries. In the nineteenth century, these plants were part of official and folk medicine in the Slovenian territory. According to current ethnobotanical studies, folk use of Aconitum species is rarely reported in Europe. The purpose of this study was to research the folk medicinal use of Aconitum species in Solčavsko, Slovenia; to collect recipes for the preparation of Aconitum spp., indications for use, and dosing; and to investigate whether the folk use of aconite was connected to poisoning incidents. Methods In Solčavsko, a remote alpine area in northern Slovenia, we performed semi-structured interviews with 19 informants in Solčavsko, 3 informants in Luče, and two retired physicians who worked in that area. Three samples of homemade ethanolic extracts were obtained from informants, and the concentration of aconitine was measured. In addition, four extracts were prepared according to reported recipes. Results All 22 informants knew of Aconitum spp. and their therapeutic use, and 5 of them provided a detailed description of the preparation and use of “voukuc”, an ethanolic extract made from aconite roots. Seven informants were unable to describe the preparation in detail, since they knew of the extract only from the narration of others or they remembered it from childhood. Most likely, the roots of Aconitum tauricum and Aconitum napellus were used for the preparation of the extract, and the solvent was homemade spirits. Four informants kept the extract at home; two extracts were prepared recently (1998 and 2015). Three extracts were analyzed, and 2 contained aconitine. Informants reported many indications for the use of the extract; it was used internally and, in some cases, externally as well. The extract was also used in animals. The extract was measured in drops, but the number of drops differed among the informants. The informants reported nine poisonings with Aconitum spp., but none of them occurred as a result of medicinal use of the extract. Conclusions In this study, we determined that folk knowledge of the medicinal use of Aconitum spp. is still present in Solčavsko, but Aconitum preparations are used only infrequently.

Gordana Koželj – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Rare tradition of the folk medicinal use of Aconitum spp. is kept alive in Solčavsko, Slovenia
    Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 2017
    Co-Authors: Marija Povšnar, Gordana Koželj, Samo Kreft, Mateja Lumpert
    Abstract:

    Aconitum species are poisonous plants that have been used in Western medicine for centuries. In the nineteenth century, these plants were part of official and folk medicine in the Slovenian territory. According to current ethnobotanical studies, folk use of Aconitum species is rarely reported in Europe. The purpose of this study was to research the folk medicinal use of Aconitum species in Solcavsko, Slovenia; to collect recipes for the preparation of Aconitum spp., indications for use, and dosing; and to investigate whether the folk use of aconite was connected to poisoning incidents. In Solcavsko, a remote alpine area in northern Slovenia, we performed semi-structured interviews with 19 informants in Solcavsko, 3 informants in Luce, and two retired physicians who worked in that area. Three samples of homemade ethanolic extracts were obtained from informants, and the concentration of aconitine was measured. In addition, four extracts were prepared according to reported recipes. All 22 informants knew of Aconitum spp. and their therapeutic use, and 5 of them provided a detailed description of the preparation and use of “voukuc”, an ethanolic extract made from aconite roots. Seven informants were unable to describe the preparation in detail, since they knew of the extract only from the narration of others or they remembered it from childhood. Most likely, the roots of Aconitum tauricum and Aconitum napellus were used for the preparation of the extract, and the solvent was homemade spirits. Four informants kept the extract at home; two extracts were prepared recently (1998 and 2015). Three extracts were analyzed, and 2 contained aconitine. Informants reported many indications for the use of the extract; it was used internally and, in some cases, externally as well. The extract was also used in animals. The extract was measured in drops, but the number of drops differed among the informants. The informants reported nine poisonings with Aconitum spp., but none of them occurred as a result of medicinal use of the extract. In this study, we determined that folk knowledge of the medicinal use of Aconitum spp. is still present in Solcavsko, but Aconitum preparations are used only infrequently.

  • Rare tradition of the folk medicinal use of Aconitum spp. is kept alive in Solčavsko, Slovenia
    Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 2017
    Co-Authors: Marija Povšnar, Gordana Koželj, Samo Kreft, Mateja Lumpert
    Abstract:

    Aconitum species are poisonous plants that have been used in Western medicine for centuries. In the nineteenth century, these plants were part of official and folk medicine in the Slovenian territory. According to current ethnobotanical studies, folk use of Aconitum species is rarely reported in Europe. The purpose of this study was to research the folk medicinal use of Aconitum species in Solcavsko, Slovenia; to collect recipes for the preparation of Aconitum spp., indications for use, and dosing; and to investigate whether the folk use of aconite was connected to poisoning incidents. In Solcavsko, a remote alpine area in northern Slovenia, we performed semi-structured interviews with 19 informants in Solcavsko, 3 informants in Luce, and two retired physicians who worked in that area. Three samples of homemade ethanolic extracts were obtained from informants, and the concentration of aconitine was measured. In addition, four extracts were prepared according to reported recipes. All 22 informants knew of Aconitum spp. and their therapeutic use, and 5 of them provided a detailed description of the preparation and use of “voukuc”, an ethanolic extract made from aconite roots. Seven informants were unable to describe the preparation in detail, since they knew of the extract only from the narration of others or they remembered it from childhood. Most likely, the roots of Aconitum tauricum and Aconitum napellus were used for the preparation of the extract, and the solvent was homemade spirits. Four informants kept the extract at home; two extracts were prepared recently (1998 and 2015). Three extracts were analyzed, and 2 contained aconitine. Informants reported many indications for the use of the extract; it was used internally and, in some cases, externally as well. The extract was also used in animals. The extract was measured in drops, but the number of drops differed among the informants. The informants reported nine poisonings with Aconitum spp., but none of them occurred as a result of medicinal use of the extract. In this study, we determined that folk knowledge of the medicinal use of Aconitum spp. is still present in Solcavsko, but Aconitum preparations are used only infrequently.

  • Rare tradition of the folk medicinal use of Aconitum spp. is kept alive in Solčavsko, Slovenia
    Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 2017
    Co-Authors: Marija Povšnar, Gordana Koželj, Samo Kreft, Mateja Lumpert
    Abstract:

    Background Aconitum species are poisonous plants that have been used in Western medicine for centuries. In the nineteenth century, these plants were part of official and folk medicine in the Slovenian territory. According to current ethnobotanical studies, folk use of Aconitum species is rarely reported in Europe. The purpose of this study was to research the folk medicinal use of Aconitum species in Solčavsko, Slovenia; to collect recipes for the preparation of Aconitum spp., indications for use, and dosing; and to investigate whether the folk use of aconite was connected to poisoning incidents. Methods In Solčavsko, a remote alpine area in northern Slovenia, we performed semi-structured interviews with 19 informants in Solčavsko, 3 informants in Luče, and two retired physicians who worked in that area. Three samples of homemade ethanolic extracts were obtained from informants, and the concentration of aconitine was measured. In addition, four extracts were prepared according to reported recipes. Results All 22 informants knew of Aconitum spp. and their therapeutic use, and 5 of them provided a detailed description of the preparation and use of “voukuc”, an ethanolic extract made from aconite roots. Seven informants were unable to describe the preparation in detail, since they knew of the extract only from the narration of others or they remembered it from childhood. Most likely, the roots of Aconitum tauricum and Aconitum napellus were used for the preparation of the extract, and the solvent was homemade spirits. Four informants kept the extract at home; two extracts were prepared recently (1998 and 2015). Three extracts were analyzed, and 2 contained aconitine. Informants reported many indications for the use of the extract; it was used internally and, in some cases, externally as well. The extract was also used in animals. The extract was measured in drops, but the number of drops differed among the informants. The informants reported nine poisonings with Aconitum spp., but none of them occurred as a result of medicinal use of the extract. Conclusions In this study, we determined that folk knowledge of the medicinal use of Aconitum spp. is still present in Solčavsko, but Aconitum preparations are used only infrequently.

Samo Kreft – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Rare tradition of the folk medicinal use of Aconitum spp. is kept alive in Solčavsko, Slovenia
    Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 2017
    Co-Authors: Marija Povšnar, Gordana Koželj, Samo Kreft, Mateja Lumpert
    Abstract:

    Aconitum species are poisonous plants that have been used in Western medicine for centuries. In the nineteenth century, these plants were part of official and folk medicine in the Slovenian territory. According to current ethnobotanical studies, folk use of Aconitum species is rarely reported in Europe. The purpose of this study was to research the folk medicinal use of Aconitum species in Solcavsko, Slovenia; to collect recipes for the preparation of Aconitum spp., indications for use, and dosing; and to investigate whether the folk use of aconite was connected to poisoning incidents. In Solcavsko, a remote alpine area in northern Slovenia, we performed semi-structured interviews with 19 informants in Solcavsko, 3 informants in Luce, and two retired physicians who worked in that area. Three samples of homemade ethanolic extracts were obtained from informants, and the concentration of aconitine was measured. In addition, four extracts were prepared according to reported recipes. All 22 informants knew of Aconitum spp. and their therapeutic use, and 5 of them provided a detailed description of the preparation and use of “voukuc”, an ethanolic extract made from aconite roots. Seven informants were unable to describe the preparation in detail, since they knew of the extract only from the narration of others or they remembered it from childhood. Most likely, the roots of Aconitum tauricum and Aconitum napellus were used for the preparation of the extract, and the solvent was homemade spirits. Four informants kept the extract at home; two extracts were prepared recently (1998 and 2015). Three extracts were analyzed, and 2 contained aconitine. Informants reported many indications for the use of the extract; it was used internally and, in some cases, externally as well. The extract was also used in animals. The extract was measured in drops, but the number of drops differed among the informants. The informants reported nine poisonings with Aconitum spp., but none of them occurred as a result of medicinal use of the extract. In this study, we determined that folk knowledge of the medicinal use of Aconitum spp. is still present in Solcavsko, but Aconitum preparations are used only infrequently.

  • Rare tradition of the folk medicinal use of Aconitum spp. is kept alive in Solčavsko, Slovenia
    Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 2017
    Co-Authors: Marija Povšnar, Gordana Koželj, Samo Kreft, Mateja Lumpert
    Abstract:

    Aconitum species are poisonous plants that have been used in Western medicine for centuries. In the nineteenth century, these plants were part of official and folk medicine in the Slovenian territory. According to current ethnobotanical studies, folk use of Aconitum species is rarely reported in Europe. The purpose of this study was to research the folk medicinal use of Aconitum species in Solcavsko, Slovenia; to collect recipes for the preparation of Aconitum spp., indications for use, and dosing; and to investigate whether the folk use of aconite was connected to poisoning incidents. In Solcavsko, a remote alpine area in northern Slovenia, we performed semi-structured interviews with 19 informants in Solcavsko, 3 informants in Luce, and two retired physicians who worked in that area. Three samples of homemade ethanolic extracts were obtained from informants, and the concentration of aconitine was measured. In addition, four extracts were prepared according to reported recipes. All 22 informants knew of Aconitum spp. and their therapeutic use, and 5 of them provided a detailed description of the preparation and use of “voukuc”, an ethanolic extract made from aconite roots. Seven informants were unable to describe the preparation in detail, since they knew of the extract only from the narration of others or they remembered it from childhood. Most likely, the roots of Aconitum tauricum and Aconitum napellus were used for the preparation of the extract, and the solvent was homemade spirits. Four informants kept the extract at home; two extracts were prepared recently (1998 and 2015). Three extracts were analyzed, and 2 contained aconitine. Informants reported many indications for the use of the extract; it was used internally and, in some cases, externally as well. The extract was also used in animals. The extract was measured in drops, but the number of drops differed among the informants. The informants reported nine poisonings with Aconitum spp., but none of them occurred as a result of medicinal use of the extract. In this study, we determined that folk knowledge of the medicinal use of Aconitum spp. is still present in Solcavsko, but Aconitum preparations are used only infrequently.

  • Rare tradition of the folk medicinal use of Aconitum spp. is kept alive in Solčavsko, Slovenia
    Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 2017
    Co-Authors: Marija Povšnar, Gordana Koželj, Samo Kreft, Mateja Lumpert
    Abstract:

    Background Aconitum species are poisonous plants that have been used in Western medicine for centuries. In the nineteenth century, these plants were part of official and folk medicine in the Slovenian territory. According to current ethnobotanical studies, folk use of Aconitum species is rarely reported in Europe. The purpose of this study was to research the folk medicinal use of Aconitum species in Solčavsko, Slovenia; to collect recipes for the preparation of Aconitum spp., indications for use, and dosing; and to investigate whether the folk use of aconite was connected to poisoning incidents. Methods In Solčavsko, a remote alpine area in northern Slovenia, we performed semi-structured interviews with 19 informants in Solčavsko, 3 informants in Luče, and two retired physicians who worked in that area. Three samples of homemade ethanolic extracts were obtained from informants, and the concentration of aconitine was measured. In addition, four extracts were prepared according to reported recipes. Results All 22 informants knew of Aconitum spp. and their therapeutic use, and 5 of them provided a detailed description of the preparation and use of “voukuc”, an ethanolic extract made from aconite roots. Seven informants were unable to describe the preparation in detail, since they knew of the extract only from the narration of others or they remembered it from childhood. Most likely, the roots of Aconitum tauricum and Aconitum napellus were used for the preparation of the extract, and the solvent was homemade spirits. Four informants kept the extract at home; two extracts were prepared recently (1998 and 2015). Three extracts were analyzed, and 2 contained aconitine. Informants reported many indications for the use of the extract; it was used internally and, in some cases, externally as well. The extract was also used in animals. The extract was measured in drops, but the number of drops differed among the informants. The informants reported nine poisonings with Aconitum spp., but none of them occurred as a result of medicinal use of the extract. Conclusions In this study, we determined that folk knowledge of the medicinal use of Aconitum spp. is still present in Solčavsko, but Aconitum preparations are used only infrequently.

Xijun Wang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • UPLC-Q-TOF-HDMS analysis of constituents in the root of two kinds of Aconitum using a metabolomics approach.
    Phytochemical Analysis, 2012
    Co-Authors: Mo Wang, Aihua Zhang, Bei Ni, Hui Dong, Xijun Wang
    Abstract:

    Introduction Metabolomics is an ‘omics’ approach that aims to comprehensively analyse all metabolites in a biological sample, and has great potential for directly elucidating plant metabolic processes. Increasing evidence supports the view that plants produce a broad range of low-molecular-weight secondary metabolites responsible for variation from species to species, thus enabling the use of secondary metabolite profiling in the chemotaxonomy. Objective To gain deeper insights into the metabolites to increasing plant diversity, we performed systematic untargeted metabolite profiling to exploit the different parts and species of Aconitum as a case study. Method Application of ultraperformance liquid chrochromatography–quadrupole time-of-flight–high-definition mass spectrometry (UPLC–QTOF–HDMS) equipped with electrospray ionisation and coupled with pattern recognition analyses to study constituents in the root of two kinds of Aconitum species. Results Twenty-two metabolites between the mother root of Aconitum carmichaelii Debx (CHW) and lateral root of Aconitum carmichaelii Debx (SFZ) and 13 metabolites between the CHW and root of Aconitum kusnezoffii Reichb (CW) have been identified. Of note, songorine, carmichaeline and isotalatizidine did not exist in CW, whereas they are present in the SFZ and CHW. Conclusion Metabolomics based UPLC–QTOF–HDMS with multivariate statistical models was effective for analysis of constituents in the root of two kinds of Aconitum species. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • rapid and global detection and characterization of Aconitum alkaloids in yin chen si ni tang a traditional chinese medical formula by ultra performance liquid chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry and automated data analysis
    Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis, 2010
    Co-Authors: Guangli Yan, Hui Sun, Wenjun Sun, Li Zhao, Xiangcai Meng, Xijun Wang
    Abstract:

    An improved method employing Metabolynx XS with mass defect filter (MDF), a post-acquisition data processing software, was developed and applied for global detection of Aconitum alkaloids in Yin Chen Si Ni Tang, a traditional Chinese medical formula (TCMF). The full-scan LC-MS/MS data sets with extra mass were acquired using ultra performance liquid chrochromatography coupled with quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/Q-TOF-MS) with the MS(E) mode in a single injection. To remove the interferences, Metabolynx XS was optimized to extract the ions of Aconitum alkaloids located at the lower abundance. As a result, 62 ions were assigned rapidly to Aconitum alkaloids and identified tentatively by comparing the accurate mass and fragments information with that of the authentic standards or by mass spectrometry analysis and retrieving the reference literatures. Compared with the previous studies on Fuzi-containing TCMF, the report detected more Aconitum alkaloids, and the analysis process was accelerated by automated data processing. It is concluded that the screening capability of Metabolynx XS with MDF, together with the utilization of MS(E) in structural elucidation, can facilitate a rapid and comprehensive searching and effective structural characterization of Aconitum alkaloids in TCMF.