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Acoustic Emission

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M. Talebzadeh – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Acoustic Emission monitoring of fatigue crack propagation
    Journal of Constructional Steel Research, 2003
    Co-Authors: T M Roberts, M. Talebzadeh

    Abstract:

    Abstract The monitoring of fatigue crack propagation in steel and welded steel compact tension and T-section girder test specimens, using an advanced Acoustic Emission system with accurate source location, is described. The compact tension test specimens were subjected to load ratios of 0.1, 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 while the T-section girders were subjected to a load ratio of 0.3. Located Acoustic Emission events were filtered for a narrow band containing the fatigue crack, and separated for different regions of the applied load range. The test results indicate that Acoustic Emission count rates, for small percentages of the applied load range close to the peak load, show reasonable correlation with crack propagation rates. Based on these correlations it may be possible to predict the remaining service life of fatigue damaged structures from the results of short term Acoustic Emission monitoring.

  • Acoustic Emission monitoring of fatigue crack propagation
    Journal of Constructional Steel Research, 2003
    Co-Authors: T M Roberts, M. Talebzadeh

    Abstract:

    The monitoring of fatigue crack propagation in steel and welded steel compact tension and T-section girder test specimens, using an advanced Acoustic Emission system with accurate source location, is described. The compact tension test specimens were subjected to load ratios of 0.1, 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 while the T-section girders were subjected to a load ratio of 0.3. Located Acoustic Emission events were filtered for a narrow band containing the fatigue crack, and separated for different regions of the applied load range. The test results indicate that Acoustic Emission count rates, for small percentages of the applied load range close to the peak load, show reasonable correlation with crack propagation rates. Based on these correlations it may be possible to predict the remaining service life of fatigue damaged structures from the results of short term Acoustic Emission monitoring. © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

T M Roberts – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Acoustic Emission monitoring of fatigue crack propagation
    Journal of Constructional Steel Research, 2003
    Co-Authors: T M Roberts, M. Talebzadeh

    Abstract:

    Abstract The monitoring of fatigue crack propagation in steel and welded steel compact tension and T-section girder test specimens, using an advanced Acoustic Emission system with accurate source location, is described. The compact tension test specimens were subjected to load ratios of 0.1, 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 while the T-section girders were subjected to a load ratio of 0.3. Located Acoustic Emission events were filtered for a narrow band containing the fatigue crack, and separated for different regions of the applied load range. The test results indicate that Acoustic Emission count rates, for small percentages of the applied load range close to the peak load, show reasonable correlation with crack propagation rates. Based on these correlations it may be possible to predict the remaining service life of fatigue damaged structures from the results of short term Acoustic Emission monitoring.

  • Acoustic Emission monitoring of fatigue crack propagation
    Journal of Constructional Steel Research, 2003
    Co-Authors: T M Roberts, M. Talebzadeh

    Abstract:

    The monitoring of fatigue crack propagation in steel and welded steel compact tension and T-section girder test specimens, using an advanced Acoustic Emission system with accurate source location, is described. The compact tension test specimens were subjected to load ratios of 0.1, 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 while the T-section girders were subjected to a load ratio of 0.3. Located Acoustic Emission events were filtered for a narrow band containing the fatigue crack, and separated for different regions of the applied load range. The test results indicate that Acoustic Emission count rates, for small percentages of the applied load range close to the peak load, show reasonable correlation with crack propagation rates. Based on these correlations it may be possible to predict the remaining service life of fatigue damaged structures from the results of short term Acoustic Emission monitoring. © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Haydn N. G. Wadley – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Acoustic Emission: Nature’s Ultrasound
    Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation, 2014
    Co-Authors: Haydn N. G. Wadley

    Abstract:

    Acoustic Emission refers to the ultrasonic signals (elastic waves) emitted by materials undergoing microscopic changes of stress state. This naturally generated ultrasound is distinctly related to the source process (dislocation motion, fracture, and some phase changes). For example, the waveform of an Acoustic Emission from a crack propagation increment contains information about the location, growth distance, velocity, and orientation of the crack. Acoustic Emission then is of interest as a naturally occurring phenomenon for the characterization of deformation and fracture mechanisms. It is also of interest as a possible passive monitoring technique for detecting, locating, and characterizing defects in structures. The current state-of-the-art of these applications is reviewed here in the context of an emerging science base, and future trends discussed.

  • Acoustic Emission for physical examination of metals
    International Materials Reviews, 2013
    Co-Authors: Haydn N. G. Wadley, C. B. Scruby, J. H. Speake

    Abstract:

    AbstractAcousticEmission techniques are beginning to be frequently used as a means of detecting and locating deformation and fracture processes in both metallic and non-metallic engineering structures. This has happened despite a relatively poor understanding of the basic physical processes involved in the generation, propagation, and detection of AcousticEmission signals, and of the influence in metals of factors such as composition and microstructure, upon the Acoustic Emission from different types of deformation and fracture processes. The measurement of Acoustic Emission, potentially, could yield much information about dynamic aspects of these processes. However, it is shown that the limitations of existing AcousticEmission recording instrumentation have enabled only qualitative information to be obtained to date. Even this data, however, has demonstrated that metallurgical variables greatly affect the AcousticEmission response of metals, and simple models to account for this are discussed.