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Acrocyanosis

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P Puddu – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • quantitative nailfold capillary microscopy findings in patients with Acrocyanosis compared with patients having systemic sclerosis and control subjects
    Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology, 2000
    Co-Authors: G Monticone, L Colonna, G Palermi, R Bono, P Puddu

    Abstract:

    Abstract Background: The morphologic capillary microscopy (capillaroscopy) pattern of Acrocyanosis is characterized by hemorrhages, pericapillary edema, and widened capillaries. These findings can result in a difficult differential diagnosis with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Objective: We sought to quantify the characteristics of the capillaroscopy pattern that distinguishes patients with Acrocyanosis from patients with SSc and control subjects. Methods: A videomicroscope with fiberoptic illumination and personal computer–based image processing was used to measure capillary density, giant capillaries, loop width, and arterial and venous limbs in 10 patients with Acrocyanosis, 10 patients with SSc, and 10 healthy control subjects. Results: Acrocyanotic patients differed in every quantitative parameter both from control subjects and patients with SSc. In particular, capillary density, which was reduced compared with that of control subjects, was much higher than that of patients with SSc: one giant capillary per finger was observed in 2 patients with Acrocyanosis, whereas more than 2 giant capillaries per finger were observed in each patient with SSc. Conclusion: These differences may aid in making the distinction between the capillaroscopy patterns in Acrocyanosis and SSc. (J Am Acad Dermatol 2000;42:787-90.)

  • Quantitative nailfold capillary microscopy findings in patients with Acrocyanosis compared with patients having systemic sclerosis and control subjects.
    Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 2000
    Co-Authors: G Monticone, L Colonna, G Palermi, R Bono, P Puddu

    Abstract:

    The morphologic capillary microscopy (capillaroscopy) pattern of Acrocyanosis is characterized by hemorrhages, pericapillary edema, and widened capillaries. These findings can result in a difficult differential diagnosis with systemic sclerosis (SSc).
    We sought to quantify the characteristics of the capillaroscopy pattern that distinguishes patients with Acrocyanosis from patients with SSc and control subjects.
    A videomicroscope with fiberoptic illumination and personal computer-based image processing was used to measure capillary density, giant capillaries, loop width, and arterial and venous limbs in 10 patients with Acrocyanosis, 10 patients with SSc, and 10 healthy control subjects.
    Acrocyanotic patients differed in every quantitative parameter both from control subjects and patients with SSc. In particular, capillary density, which was reduced compared with that of control subjects, was much higher than that of patients with SSc: one giant capillary per finger was observed in 2 patients with Acrocyanosis, whereas more than 2 giant capillaries per finger were observed in each patient with SSc.
    These differences may aid in making the distinction between the capillaroscopy patterns in Acrocyanosis and SSc.

Eric Jeziorski – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • bascule syndrome orthostatic cyanosis and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome time for decanting old wine
    British Journal of Dermatology, 2016
    Co-Authors: D Bessis, V Pallure, Eric Jeziorski

    Abstract:

    We thank Dr McGibbon for his comments on the BASCULE syndrome (Bier’s Anemic Spots associated with Cyanosis and Urticaria-Like Eruption).

    The author suggests that this syndrome is essentially a redescription of “orthostatic Acrocyanosis (OA)” associated with chronic orthostatic intolerance and postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS), as previously reported by Stewart.1 We would like to address this assertion. Although we agree that our description of BASCULE syndrome in adult patients is close to the picture that Stewart labelled “Acrocyanosis in POTS”

    This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Donna J Twist – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Acrocyanosis in a spinal cord injured patient effects of computer controlled neuromuscular electrical stimulation a case report
    Physical Therapy, 1990
    Co-Authors: Donna J Twist

    Abstract:

    This case report documents the treatment of a spinal cord injured patient with Acrocyanosis of both feet. The 37-year-old white male patient sustained a traumatic spinal cord injury at the age of 16 years, which resulted in an incomplete vertebral fracture of the C5-C6 level. He was treated with computerized neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) of the quadriceps femoris muscle with weights applied to the ankles an average of two times per week for six weeks. Improvements in the color of the patient’s skin and toe ulcers, stronger pedal pulses bilaterally, decreased swelling bilaterally, and subjective reports of less discomfort were noted. The empirical findings of this case report suggest that computerized NMES may be effective for improving circulation in the spinal cord injured individual with Acrocyanosis. Further study, however, is needed to determine whether a relationship may exist between blood flow and computerized NMES.

  • Acrocyanosis in a Spinal Cord Injured Patient—Effects of Computer-Controlled Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation: A Case Report
    Physical Therapy, 1990
    Co-Authors: Donna J Twist

    Abstract:

    This case report documents the treatment of a spinal cord injured patient with Acrocyanosis of both feet. The 37-year-old white male patient sustained a traumatic spinal cord injury at the age of 16 years, which resulted in an incomplete vertebral fracture of the C5-C6 level. He was treated with computerized neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) of the quadriceps femoris muscle with weights applied to the ankles an average of two times per week for six weeks. Improvements in the color of the patient’s skin and toe ulcers, stronger pedal pulses bilaterally, decreased swelling bilaterally, and subjective reports of less discomfort were noted. The empirical findings of this case report suggest that computerized NMES may be effective for improving circulation in the spinal cord injured individual with Acrocyanosis. Further study, however, is needed to determine whether a relationship may exist between blood flow and computerized NMES.