Actimetry - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Actimetry

The Experts below are selected from a list of 681 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Actimetry – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Salome Kurth – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Actimetry in infant sleep research: an approach to facilitate comparability
    Sleep, 2019
    Co-Authors: Sarah F. Schoch, Oskar G. Jenni, Malcolm Kohler, Salome Kurth
    Abstract:

    Study objectives Only standardized objective assessments reliably capture the large variability of sleep behavior in infancy, which is the most pronounced throughout the human lifespan. This is important for clinical practice as well as basic research. Actimetry is a cost-efficient method to objectively estimate infant sleep/wake behavior from limb movements. Nevertheless, the standardization of Actimetry-based sleep/wake measures is limited by two factors: the use of different computational approaches and the bias towards measuring only nighttime sleep-neglecting ~20 % of sleep infants obtain during daytime. Thus, we evaluate the comparability of two commonly used Actimetry algorithms in infants and propose adjustments to increase comparability. Methods We used Actimetry in 50 infants for 10 continuous days at ages 3, 6, and 12 months in a longitudinal approach. We analyzed the infants’ sleep/wake behaviors by applying two algorithms: Sadeh and Oakley/Respironics. We compared minute-by-minute agreement and Kappa between the two algorithms, as well as the algorithms with sleep/wake measures from a comprehensive 24-hour parent-reported diary. Results Agreement between uncorrected algorithms was moderate (77%-84%). By introducing a six-step adjustment, we increased agreement between algorithms (96%-97%) and with the diary. This decreased the difference in estimated sleep behaviors, e.g. Total Sleep Duration from 4.5 to 0.2 hours. Conclusions These adjustments enhance comparability between infant Actimetry studies and the inclusion of parent-reported diaries allows the integration of daytime sleep. Objectively assessed infant sleep that is comparable across different studies supports the establishment of normative developmental trajectories and clinical cutoffs.

  • Actimetry in infant sleep research: an approach to facilitate comparability
    , 2018
    Co-Authors: Sarah F. Schoch, Oskar G. Jenni, Malcolm Kohler, Salome Kurth
    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT Study Objectives Only standardized objective assessments reliably capture the large variability of sleep behavior in infancy, which is the most pronounced during the human lifespan. This is important for clinical as well as basic research. Actimetry is a cost-efficient method to objectively track infant sleep/wake behavior by assessing limb movements. Nevertheless, the standardization of Actimetry-based sleep/wake measures is limited by two factors: the use of different computational approaches and the bias towards measuring only nighttime sleep – neglecting ∼20 % of sleep infants obtain during daytime. Methods We used Actimetry in 50 infants for 10 continuous days at ages 3, 6 and 12 mo in a longitudinal approach. We analyzed the infants’ sleep/wake behaviors applying with two commonly used algorithms: Sadeh and Oakley/Respironics. We compared minute-by-minute agreement and Kappa between the two algorithms, as well as the algorithms with sleep/wake measures from a comprehensive 24-hour, parent-reported diary. Results Agreement between uncorrected algorithms was moderate (77 – 84%). By introducing a 6-step adjustment, we increased agreement between algorithms (96 – 97%) and with the diary. This decreased the difference between the two algorithms in e.g. Total Sleep Duration from 4.5 h to 0.2 h. Conclusions This computational pipeline enhances comparability between infant Actimetry studies and the inclusion of parent-reported diaries allows the integration of daytime sleep. Objectively assessed infant sleep that is comparable across different studies supports the establishment of normative developmental trajectories and clinical cutoffs.

P. Adeleine – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Actimetry in sleep medicine
    Sleep & Breathing, 1997
    Co-Authors: O. Kellner, H. Bastuji, P. Adeleine
    Abstract:

    Actigraphy is more and more used in the longterm record of sleep of patients with insomnia. The correlation with data from polysomnography is reasonable for parameters like total sleep period (TSP) with r = 0,95-0,97 in healthy controls and r = 0,77-0,91 in patients. However for parameters, which inform about sleep fragmentation like wake after sleep onset (WASO) the correlation is not satisfieing with r = 0,87 in healthy controls and r = 0,49-0,63 in patients with fragmented sleep. The question is therefore, if actigraphs are really more useful in the record of sleep in patients with insomnia and fragmented sleep than sleep calenders. Die Aktimetrie wird in der Langzeitbeobachtung des Schlafrhythmus bestimmter Patienten zunehmend eingesetzt. Die Übereinstimmung (Korrelation) mit der Polysomnographie ist für bestimmte Parameter wie die total sleep period (TSP) mit r = 0,95-0,97 für Probanden und r = 0,77-0,91 für schlafgestörte Patienten zwar recht hoch, für Parameter, die über die Fragmentierung des Schlafes Auskunft geben, wie wake after sleep onset (WASO), mit r =0,87 für Probanden und r =0,49-0,63 für Patienten jedoch nicht zufriedenstellend. Es stellt sich daher die Frage, inwieweit die Aktimetrie in der Langzeitbeobachtung bei Patienten den Schlafkalendern überlegen ist.

  • Actimetry in sleep medicine.
    Sleep & breathing = Schlaf & Atmung, 1997
    Co-Authors: O. Kellner, H. Bastuji, P. Adeleine
    Abstract:

    Actigraphy is more and more used in the longterm record of sleep of patients with insomnia. The correlation with data from polysomnography is reasonable for parameters like total sleep period (TSP) with r = 0,95-0,97 in healthy controls and r = 0,77-0,91 in patients. However for parameters, which inform about sleep fragmentation like wake after sleep onset (WASO) the correlation is not satisfieing with r = 0,87 in healthy controls and r = 0,49-0,63 in patients with fragmented sleep. The question is therefore, if actigraphs are really more useful in the record of sleep in patients with insomnia and fragmented sleep than sleep calenders.

Sarah F. Schoch – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Actimetry in infant sleep research: an approach to facilitate comparability
    Sleep, 2019
    Co-Authors: Sarah F. Schoch, Oskar G. Jenni, Malcolm Kohler, Salome Kurth
    Abstract:

    Study objectives Only standardized objective assessments reliably capture the large variability of sleep behavior in infancy, which is the most pronounced throughout the human lifespan. This is important for clinical practice as well as basic research. Actimetry is a cost-efficient method to objectively estimate infant sleep/wake behavior from limb movements. Nevertheless, the standardization of Actimetry-based sleep/wake measures is limited by two factors: the use of different computational approaches and the bias towards measuring only nighttime sleep-neglecting ~20 % of sleep infants obtain during daytime. Thus, we evaluate the comparability of two commonly used Actimetry algorithms in infants and propose adjustments to increase comparability. Methods We used Actimetry in 50 infants for 10 continuous days at ages 3, 6, and 12 months in a longitudinal approach. We analyzed the infants’ sleep/wake behaviors by applying two algorithms: Sadeh and Oakley/Respironics. We compared minute-by-minute agreement and Kappa between the two algorithms, as well as the algorithms with sleep/wake measures from a comprehensive 24-hour parent-reported diary. Results Agreement between uncorrected algorithms was moderate (77%-84%). By introducing a six-step adjustment, we increased agreement between algorithms (96%-97%) and with the diary. This decreased the difference in estimated sleep behaviors, e.g. Total Sleep Duration from 4.5 to 0.2 hours. Conclusions These adjustments enhance comparability between infant Actimetry studies and the inclusion of parent-reported diaries allows the integration of daytime sleep. Objectively assessed infant sleep that is comparable across different studies supports the establishment of normative developmental trajectories and clinical cutoffs.

  • Actimetry in infant sleep research: an approach to facilitate comparability
    , 2018
    Co-Authors: Sarah F. Schoch, Oskar G. Jenni, Malcolm Kohler, Salome Kurth
    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT Study Objectives Only standardized objective assessments reliably capture the large variability of sleep behavior in infancy, which is the most pronounced during the human lifespan. This is important for clinical as well as basic research. Actimetry is a cost-efficient method to objectively track infant sleep/wake behavior by assessing limb movements. Nevertheless, the standardization of Actimetry-based sleep/wake measures is limited by two factors: the use of different computational approaches and the bias towards measuring only nighttime sleep – neglecting ∼20 % of sleep infants obtain during daytime. Methods We used Actimetry in 50 infants for 10 continuous days at ages 3, 6 and 12 mo in a longitudinal approach. We analyzed the infants’ sleep/wake behaviors applying with two commonly used algorithms: Sadeh and Oakley/Respironics. We compared minute-by-minute agreement and Kappa between the two algorithms, as well as the algorithms with sleep/wake measures from a comprehensive 24-hour, parent-reported diary. Results Agreement between uncorrected algorithms was moderate (77 – 84%). By introducing a 6-step adjustment, we increased agreement between algorithms (96 – 97%) and with the diary. This decreased the difference between the two algorithms in e.g. Total Sleep Duration from 4.5 h to 0.2 h. Conclusions This computational pipeline enhances comparability between infant Actimetry studies and the inclusion of parent-reported diaries allows the integration of daytime sleep. Objectively assessed infant sleep that is comparable across different studies supports the establishment of normative developmental trajectories and clinical cutoffs.

Marta Garaulet – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

O. Kellner – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Actimetry in sleep medicine
    Sleep & Breathing, 1997
    Co-Authors: O. Kellner, H. Bastuji, P. Adeleine
    Abstract:

    Actigraphy is more and more used in the longterm record of sleep of patients with insomnia. The correlation with data from polysomnography is reasonable for parameters like total sleep period (TSP) with r = 0,95-0,97 in healthy controls and r = 0,77-0,91 in patients. However for parameters, which inform about sleep fragmentation like wake after sleep onset (WASO) the correlation is not satisfieing with r = 0,87 in healthy controls and r = 0,49-0,63 in patients with fragmented sleep. The question is therefore, if actigraphs are really more useful in the record of sleep in patients with insomnia and fragmented sleep than sleep calenders. Die Aktimetrie wird in der Langzeitbeobachtung des Schlafrhythmus bestimmter Patienten zunehmend eingesetzt. Die Übereinstimmung (Korrelation) mit der Polysomnographie ist für bestimmte Parameter wie die total sleep period (TSP) mit r = 0,95-0,97 für Probanden und r = 0,77-0,91 für schlafgestörte Patienten zwar recht hoch, für Parameter, die über die Fragmentierung des Schlafes Auskunft geben, wie wake after sleep onset (WASO), mit r =0,87 für Probanden und r =0,49-0,63 für Patienten jedoch nicht zufriedenstellend. Es stellt sich daher die Frage, inwieweit die Aktimetrie in der Langzeitbeobachtung bei Patienten den Schlafkalendern überlegen ist.

  • Actimetry in sleep medicine.
    Sleep & breathing = Schlaf & Atmung, 1997
    Co-Authors: O. Kellner, H. Bastuji, P. Adeleine
    Abstract:

    Actigraphy is more and more used in the longterm record of sleep of patients with insomnia. The correlation with data from polysomnography is reasonable for parameters like total sleep period (TSP) with r = 0,95-0,97 in healthy controls and r = 0,77-0,91 in patients. However for parameters, which inform about sleep fragmentation like wake after sleep onset (WASO) the correlation is not satisfieing with r = 0,87 in healthy controls and r = 0,49-0,63 in patients with fragmented sleep. The question is therefore, if actigraphs are really more useful in the record of sleep in patients with insomnia and fragmented sleep than sleep calenders.