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Kate Smith – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Social workers welcome refugees to the UK – joint statement and call for Action by the Association of Professors of Social Work (APSW), British Association of Social Workers (BASW), Joint University Council Social Work Education Committee (JUC SWEC)
    , 2015
    Co-Authors: Kate Smith

    Abstract:

    In November 2015, the Association of Professors of Social Work, the British Association of Social Workers, the Joint University Council Social Work Education Committee, and the Social Work Action Network (SWAN) agreed a joint statement and call for Action on the refugee crisis across the EU. This statement was also supported by colleagues from the legal community in their call for Action to the UK government and appeared on Monday 12 October 2015 in The Times and The Guardian. Dr. Kate Smith contributed to drafting this statement.

  • social workers welcome refugees to the uk joint statement and call for Action by the association of professors of social work apsw british association of social workers basw joint university council social work education committee juc swec and social
    , 2015
    Co-Authors: Kate Smith

    Abstract:

    In November 2015, the Association of Professors of Social Work, the British Association of Social Workers, the Joint University Council Social Work Education Committee, and the Social Work Action Network (SWAN) agreed a joint statement and call for Action on the refugee crisis across the EU. This statement was also supported by colleagues from the legal community in their call for Action to the UK government and appeared on Monday 12 October 2015 in The Times and The Guardian. Dr. Kate Smith contributed to drafting this statement.

Ellen L. Haring – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • depression prevalence and geographic distribution in united states military women results from the 2017 service women s Action Network needs assessment
    Journal of Military Veteran and Family Health, 2019
    Co-Authors: Kate H. Thomas, Justin T. Mcdaniel, Mariana Grohowski, Kari L. Fletcher, Ronald Whalen, David L. Albright, Ellen L. Haring

    Abstract:

    Introduction:To better understand depression in United States (US) servicewomen, needs assessment data from the Service Women’s Action Network (SWAN) were collected and analyzed, with comparison sa…

  • Depression prevalence and geographic distribution in United States military women: results from the 2017 Service Women’s Action Network needs assessment
    Journal of Military Veteran and Family Health, 2019
    Co-Authors: Kate H. Thomas, Justin T. Mcdaniel, Mariana Grohowski, Kari L. Fletcher, Ronald Whalen, David L. Albright, Ellen L. Haring

    Abstract:

    Introduction:To better understand depression in United States (US) servicewomen, needs assessment data from the Service Women’s Action Network (SWAN) were collected and analyzed, with comparison sa…

A. Nickles Fader – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Lifestyle and Weight Management Counseling in Uterine Cancer Survivors: A Study of the Uterine Cancer Action Network
    International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, 2015
    Co-Authors: Jill Tseng, A.m. Jernigan, Ritu Salani, Robert E. Bristow, Kara Long Roche, A. Nickles Fader

    Abstract:

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences, attitudes, and preferences of uterine cancer survivors with regard to weight and lifestyle counseling. Materials and Methods Members of the US Uterine Cancer Action Network of the Foundation for Women’s Cancer were invited to complete a 45-item, Web-based survey. Standard descriptive statistical methods and χ2 tests were used to analyze responses. Results One hundred eighty (28.3%) uterine cancer survivors completed the survey. Median age was 58 years, 85% were white, and median survivorship period was 4.4 years. Most had stage I–II disease (69%) and were overweight or obese (65%). Eighty-nine percent of respondents received care by a gynecologic oncologist. Increased respondent body mass index was associated with decreased exercise frequency (P = 0.016). Only 50% of respondents underwent any weight/lifestyle counseling, with those living in the West and Southwest reporting the highest rates (70.8% and 69.2%, P = 0.011). Most who received counseling felt that discussions were motivating, performed in a sensitive manner, and did not undermine the patient–physician relationship. Specific recommendations were rarely offered; there were no reported referrals to weight loss programs or bariatric specialists, and few (6%) reported referrals to nutritionists. Respondents (85%) preferred their gynecologic oncologist address weight using direct, face-to-face counseling with specific recommendations regarding interventions and referral to specialists. Finally, self-reported overweight respondents experienced greater success with weight loss compared to those reporting obesity or morbid obesity (30.8% vs 15.8% vs 12.5%, P = 0.011). Conclusions Uterine cancer survivors reported high obesity, low activity rates, and a desire for substantive weight loss counseling from their gynecologic oncologists. Respondents suggested that current counseling practices are inadequate and incongruent with their needs. Further research to define optimal timing, interventional strategies, and specific recommendations for successful lifestyle changes in this population is warranted.

  • Endometrial cancer survivor perspectives on weight loss and lifestyle modifications: A Uterine Cancer Action Network study
    Gynecologic Oncology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Jill Tseng, Kara C. Long, A.m. Jernigan, Ritu Salani, Robert E. Bristow, A. Nickles Fader

    Abstract:

    Objectives: To examine the experiences and preferences of uterine cancer (UC) survivors with regard to weight and lifestyle counseling performed by their cancer providers. Methods: Members of the Uterine Cancer Action Network of the Foundation for Women’s Cancer were invited to complete a 45-item web-based survey. Standard descriptive statistical methods and chi square tests were used to analyze responses. Results: For the 177/657 UC survivors who completed the survey (27%), themedian agewas 58 years, 90%werewhite, and themedian length of survivorship was 4.4 years. Most were diagnosed with stage I disease (89%). Eighty-nine percent received their cancer care from a gynecologic oncologist (GO). Sixty-five percent classified themselves as overweight or obese. Increased respondent bodymass index was associated with decreased exercise frequency (P = 0.016). Only 50% of respondents received any weight or lifestyle counseling. Counseling rates differed significantly between geographic regions, with respondents in the West and Southwest reporting the highest rates (70.8% and 69.2%, P = 0.011). Most who received counseling felt that discussions were motivating, were performed sensitively, and did not undermine the patient–physician relationship. However, 72% of respondents did not believe that specific recommendations or interventions were offered; no survivors reported referrals to weight loss programs or bariatric specialists and few (6%) reported referrals to nutritionists. Overweight patients experienced greater successes with weight loss/ lifestyle changes compared to their obese or morbidly obese counterparts (30.8% vs. 15.8% vs. 12.5%, P = 0.011). Respondents (85%) preferred that their GO address weight using direct, face-toface counseling, with specific recommendations for interventions and referral to weight specialists. Conclusions: In this UC Action Network study, survivors reported high obesity and low activity rates and desire for substantive weight loss counseling from their GOs. Respondents suggested that current counseling practices are inadequate and incongruent with their needs, especially for morbidly obese survivors. Specific weight loss recommendations, with referrals to other specialists for lifestyle interventions, were desired.