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Active Heating

The Experts below are selected from a list of 297 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Andrew J. Young – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • telemetry pill measurement of core temperature in humans during Active Heating and cooling
    Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 1998
    Co-Authors: Catherine Obrien, Mark J. Buller, Reed W. Hoyt, John W. Castellani, Andrew J. Young

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACTPurpose:This study compared the agreement between core temperature measurements obtained using an ingestible temperature pill telemetry system (Tpill) with those obtained from rectal (Tre) and esophageal (Tes) thermocouples under conditions of increasing and decreasing body temperature.Metho

  • Telemetry Pill Measurement of Core Temperature during Active Heating and Cooling.
    , 1997
    Co-Authors: Catherine O'brien, Reed W. Hoyt, Mark J. Buller, John W. Castellani, Andrew J. Young

    Abstract:

    Abstract : The agreement between core temperature measurements obtained using an ingestible temperature pill telemetry system (T sub pill) and rectal (T sub re) and esophageal (T sub es) thermocouples was compared under conditions of both increasing and decreasing body temperature. Nine subjects participated in four 3-h trials: cold (18 deg C) water rest (CWR); cold water exercise (CWE); warm (36 deg C) water rest (WWR); and warm water exercise (WWE). During exercise trials, subjects completed three bouts of 15-min rest, followed by 45-min exercise on a cycle ergometer at 50% of peak oxygen uptake. The temperature pill was taken 10-12 h before testing. Root mean squared deviation (RMSD) was calculated for each pair of measurements (T sub pill vs. T sub re, T sub pill VS T sub es, T sub re VS. T sub es) for each trial. An RMSD of ‘0’ indicates perfect agreement, and as RMSD increases, agreement worsens. On CWR, the RMSD for T sub pill-T sub es (0.23+/-0.04) was lower (P

Martin Zálešák – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The Use of the Photovoltaic System in Combination With a Thermal Energy Storage for Heating and Thermoelectric Cooling
    Applied Sciences, 2018
    Co-Authors: Jan Skovajsa, Martin Zálešák

    Abstract:

    The article is focused on the research of the usage of modern accumulation technology. The proposed system is able to improve the thermal comfort of building interiors. That text depicts the technology, which uses a photovoltaics and other renewable energy sources for Active Heating and cooling. The bases of the presented technology are the phase change material and thermal energy storages. So, it passively improves the thermal capacity of the constructions of the buildings. Moreover, there is a possibility to use it for Active Heating and cooling. The technology contains thermoelectric assemblies, so, there is a very interesting possibility to store thermal energy with use of renewable energy sources (such as photovoltaic system) and thermoelectric coolers side by side. In the manuscript, there are shown measurements and results of the Active operating modes of proposed technology. It was found the technology is able to work in Active Heating and cooling modes. It works quite well in Active Heating mode. On the other hand, thermoelectric cooling mode had a problem with overHeating. In the end, the problem was solved and the cooling mode works. The measurements and results are described in the text.

  • Thermoelectric cooling in combination with photovoltaics and thermal energy storage
    MATEC Web of Conferences, 2017
    Co-Authors: Jan Skovajsa, Martin Zálešák

    Abstract:

    The article deals with the use of modern technologies that can improve the thermal comfort in buildings. The article describes the usage of thermal energy storage device based on the phase change material (PCM). The technology improves the thermal capacity of the building and it is possible to use it for Active Heating and cooling. It is designed as a “green technology” so it is able to use renewable energy sources, e.g., photovoltaic panels, solar thermal collectors, and heat pump. Moreover, an interesting possibility is the ability to use thermal energy storage in combination with a photovoltaic system and thermoelectric coolers. In the research, there were made measurements of the different operating modes and the results are presented in the text.

  • Phase Change Material Based Accumulation Panels in Combination with Renewable Energy Sources and Thermoelectric Cooling
    Energies, 2017
    Co-Authors: Jan Skovajsa, Martin Koláček, Martin Zálešák

    Abstract:

    The article deals with the use of modern materials and technologies that can improve the thermal comfort in buildings. The article describes the design and usage of a special accumulation device, which is composed of thermal panels based on phase change materials (PCMs). The thermal panels have an integrated tube heat exchanger and Heating foils. The technology can be used as a passive or Active system for Heating and cooling. It is designed as a “green technology”, so it is able to use renewable energy sources, e.g., photovoltaic (PV) panels, solar thermal collectors and heat pumps. Moreover, an interesting possibility is the ability to use thermoelectric coolers. In the research, measurements of the different operating modes were made, and the results are presented in the text. The measurement approves that the technology improves the thermal capacity of the building, and it is possible to use it for Active Heating and cooling.

Ronald E. West – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Active Heating and Cooling
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Ronal Larson, Ronald E. West

    Abstract:

    This chapter contains sections titled: Historical Background, Legislative Mandates, National Program for Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings, Lessons Learned, References

  • Solar Thermal Quality Assurance
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Ronal Larson, Ronald E. West

    Abstract:

    Implementation of Solar Thermal Technology describes thesuccesses and failures of the commercialization efforts of the U.S.solar thermal energy program, from the oil embargo of 1973 throughthe demise of the program in the early Reagan administration andits afterlife since then. The emphasis throughout is on lessonslearned from the solar experience, with an eye toward applicationsto other projects as well as toward possible renewal of efforts atcommercialization.Part I discusses the history of government involvement in solardevelopment and the parallel development of the market for solarproducts. Part II looks at the histories of specific commercializationprograms for five areas (Active Heating and cooling, passivetechnologies, passive commercial building activities, industrialprocess heat, and high-temperature technologies). Parts III-VIIIfocus in turn on demonstration and construction projects, qualityassurance, information dissemination programs, efforts to transfertechnology to industry, incentive programs (tax credits, financing,and grants), and organizational support.Solar Heat Technologies: Fundamentals and Applications, Volume 10

  • Solar Thermal Organizational Support
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Ronal Larson, Ronald E. West

    Abstract:

    Implementation of Solar Thermal Technology describes thesuccesses and failures of the commercialization efforts of the U.S.solar thermal energy program, from the oil embargo of 1973 throughthe demise of the program in the early Reagan administration andits afterlife since then. The emphasis throughout is on lessonslearned from the solar experience, with an eye toward applicationsto other projects as well as toward possible renewal of efforts atcommercialization.Part I discusses the history of government involvement in solardevelopment and the parallel development of the market for solarproducts. Part II looks at the histories of specific commercializationprograms for five areas (Active Heating and cooling, passivetechnologies, passive commercial building activities, industrialprocess heat, and high-temperature technologies). Parts III-VIIIfocus in turn on demonstration and construction projects, qualityassurance, information dissemination programs, efforts to transfertechnology to industry, incentive programs (tax credits, financing,and grants), and organizational support.Solar Heat Technologies: Fundamentals and Applications, Volume 10