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Active Lifestyle

The Experts below are selected from a list of 12144 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Marcel W. M. Post – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Physical activity in wheelchair users with spinal cord injury: prerequisites for and effects of an Active Lifestyle
    Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Geneeskunde, 2020
    Co-Authors: De Groot S, Linda Valent, Rogier Broeksteeg, Marcel W. M. Post, Van Koppenhagen Cf, Van Der Woude Lh

    Abstract:

    : Wheelchair users with spinal cord injury generally have a relatively inActive Lifestyle. Several studies have shown that an inActive Lifestyle is associated with a lower fitness level, poorer health, reduced social participation and a lower quality of life for wheelchair users. There are a number of ways in which wheelchair users can remain Active in daily life, for instance, by using a wheelchair or handbike for mobility instead of taking the car, and by participating in sports or wheelchair sports. Some prerequisites should be met to enable wheelchair users to have a more Active Lifestyle: the wheelchair should be optimally adjusted and the everyday environment, including sport facilities, should be easily accessible. An Active Lifestyle often also requires a change in attitude or behaviour. General practitioners, other primary healthcare providers and rehabilitation professionals can help in this respect.

  • effectiveness of a self management intervention to promote an Active Lifestyle in persons with long term spinal cord injury the habits randomized clinical trial
    Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 2017
    Co-Authors: Hedwig Kooijmans, Marcel W. M. Post, Helma M H Bongersjanssen, Henk J Stam, Lucas H V Van Der Woude, Dorien C M Spijkerman, Govert J Snoek, C F Van Koppenhagen, Jos W R Twisk, Johannes B J Bussmann

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: Most people with long-term spinal cord injury (SCI) have a very inActive Lifestyle. Higher activity levels have been associated with health benefits and enhanced quality of life. Consequently, encouraging an Active Lifestyle is important and behavioral interventions are needed to establish durable Lifestyle changes. OBJECTIVE: The Healthy Active Behavioral Intervention in SCI (HABITS) study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a structured self-management intervention to promote an Active Lifestyle in inActive persons with long-term SCI. METHODS: This assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial was conducted at 4 specialized SCI units in the Netherlands. Sixty-four individuals with long-term SCI (>10 years), wheelchair-user and physically inActive, were included. Participants were randomized to either a 16-week self-management intervention consisting of group meetings and individual counseling and a book, or to a control group that only received information about Active Lifestyle by one group meeting and a book. Measurements were performed at baseline, 16 weeks, and 42 weeks. Primary outcome measures were self-reported physical activity and minutes per day spent in wheelchair driving. Secondary outcomes included perceived behavioral control (exercise self-efficacy, proActive coping), stages of change concerning exercise, and attitude toward exercise. RESULTS: Mixed models analyses adjusted for age, sex, level of SCI, time since injury, baseline body mass index, and location did not show significant differences between the intervention and control groups on the primary and secondary outcomes ( P ≥ .05). CONCLUSIONS: A structured 16-week self-management intervention was not effective to change behavior toward a more Active Lifestyle and to improve perceived behavioral control, stages of change, and attitude.

  • Active Lifestyle rehabilitation interventions in aging spinal cord injury allrisc a multicentre research program
    Disability and Rehabilitation, 2013
    Co-Authors: L H V Van Der Woude, S De Groot, Klaas Postema, Johannes B J Bussmann, Thomas W J Janssen, Marcel W. M. Post

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: With today’s specialized medical care, life expectancy of persons with a spinal cord injury (SCI) has considerably improved. With increasing age and time since injury, many individuals with SCI, however, show a serious inActive Lifestyle, associated with deconditioning and secondary health conditions (SHCs) (e.g. pressure sores, urinary and respiratory tract infections, osteoporosis, upper-extremity pain, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease) and resulting in reduced participation and quality of life (QoL). Avoiding this downward spiral, is crucial. OBJECTIVES: To understand possible deconditioning and SHCs in persons aging with a SCI in the context of Active Lifestyle, fitness, participation and QoL and to examine interventions that enhance Active Lifestyle, fitness, participation and QoL and help prevent some of the SHCs. METHODS: A multicentre multidisciplinary research program (Active Lifestyle Rehabilitation Interventions in aging Spinal Cord injury, ALLRISC) in the setting of the long-standing Dutch SCI-rehabilitation clinical research network. RESULTS: ALLRISC is a four-study research program addressing inActive Lifestyle, deconditioning, and SHCs and their associations in people aging with SCI. The program consists of a cross-sectional study (n = 300) and three randomized clinical trials. All studies share a focus on fitness, Active Lifestyle, SHCs and deconditioning and outcome measures on these and other (participation, QoL) domains. It is hypothesized that a self-management program, low-intensity wheelchair exercise and hybrid functional electrical stimulation-supported leg and handcycling are effective interventions to enhance Active life style and fitness, help to prevent some of the important SHCs in chronic SCI and improve participation and QoL. CONCLUSION: ALLRISC aims to provide evidence-based preventive components of a rehabilitation aftercare system that preserves functioning in aging persons with SCI.

Johannes B J Bussmann – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • effectiveness of a self management intervention to promote an Active Lifestyle in persons with long term spinal cord injury the habits randomized clinical trial
    Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 2017
    Co-Authors: Hedwig Kooijmans, Marcel W. M. Post, Helma M H Bongersjanssen, Henk J Stam, Lucas H V Van Der Woude, Dorien C M Spijkerman, Govert J Snoek, C F Van Koppenhagen, Jos W R Twisk, Johannes B J Bussmann

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: Most people with long-term spinal cord injury (SCI) have a very inActive Lifestyle. Higher activity levels have been associated with health benefits and enhanced quality of life. Consequently, encouraging an Active Lifestyle is important and behavioral interventions are needed to establish durable Lifestyle changes. OBJECTIVE: The Healthy Active Behavioral Intervention in SCI (HABITS) study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a structured self-management intervention to promote an Active Lifestyle in inActive persons with long-term SCI. METHODS: This assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial was conducted at 4 specialized SCI units in the Netherlands. Sixty-four individuals with long-term SCI (>10 years), wheelchair-user and physically inActive, were included. Participants were randomized to either a 16-week self-management intervention consisting of group meetings and individual counseling and a book, or to a control group that only received information about Active Lifestyle by one group meeting and a book. Measurements were performed at baseline, 16 weeks, and 42 weeks. Primary outcome measures were self-reported physical activity and minutes per day spent in wheelchair driving. Secondary outcomes included perceived behavioral control (exercise self-efficacy, proActive coping), stages of change concerning exercise, and attitude toward exercise. RESULTS: Mixed models analyses adjusted for age, sex, level of SCI, time since injury, baseline body mass index, and location did not show significant differences between the intervention and control groups on the primary and secondary outcomes ( P ≥ .05). CONCLUSIONS: A structured 16-week self-management intervention was not effective to change behavior toward a more Active Lifestyle and to improve perceived behavioral control, stages of change, and attitude.

  • Active Lifestyle rehabilitation interventions in aging spinal cord injury allrisc a multicentre research program
    Disability and Rehabilitation, 2013
    Co-Authors: L H V Van Der Woude, S De Groot, Klaas Postema, Johannes B J Bussmann, Thomas W J Janssen, Marcel W. M. Post

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: With today’s specialized medical care, life expectancy of persons with a spinal cord injury (SCI) has considerably improved. With increasing age and time since injury, many individuals with SCI, however, show a serious inActive Lifestyle, associated with deconditioning and secondary health conditions (SHCs) (e.g. pressure sores, urinary and respiratory tract infections, osteoporosis, upper-extremity pain, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease) and resulting in reduced participation and quality of life (QoL). Avoiding this downward spiral, is crucial. OBJECTIVES: To understand possible deconditioning and SHCs in persons aging with a SCI in the context of Active Lifestyle, fitness, participation and QoL and to examine interventions that enhance Active Lifestyle, fitness, participation and QoL and help prevent some of the SHCs. METHODS: A multicentre multidisciplinary research program (Active Lifestyle Rehabilitation Interventions in aging Spinal Cord injury, ALLRISC) in the setting of the long-standing Dutch SCI-rehabilitation clinical research network. RESULTS: ALLRISC is a four-study research program addressing inActive Lifestyle, deconditioning, and SHCs and their associations in people aging with SCI. The program consists of a cross-sectional study (n = 300) and three randomized clinical trials. All studies share a focus on fitness, Active Lifestyle, SHCs and deconditioning and outcome measures on these and other (participation, QoL) domains. It is hypothesized that a self-management program, low-intensity wheelchair exercise and hybrid functional electrical stimulation-supported leg and handcycling are effective interventions to enhance Active life style and fitness, help to prevent some of the important SHCs in chronic SCI and improve participation and QoL. CONCLUSION: ALLRISC aims to provide evidence-based preventive components of a rehabilitation aftercare system that preserves functioning in aging persons with SCI.

Leslie R Morse – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Active Lifestyle is associated with reduced dyspnea and greater life satisfaction in spinal cord injury
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 2016
    Co-Authors: Eric Garshick, Leslie R Morse, Sara J Mulroy, Daniel E Graves, Karen Greenwald, John A Horton

    Abstract:

    Abstract Objective To assess the relations between measures of activity with dyspnea and satisfaction with life in chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Five SCI centers. Participants Between July 2012 and March 2015, subjects (N=347) with traumatic SCI ≥1 year after injury who used a manual wheelchair or walked with or without an assistive device reported hours spent away from home or yard on the previous 3 days, sports participation, and planned exercise. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) and dyspnea. Dyspnea was defined as shortness of breath when hurrying on the level or going up a slight hill, going slower than people the same age on the level because of breathlessness, or stopping for breath when going at your own pace, or after about 100yd (or after a few minutes) on the level. Results Dyspnea prevalence was 30%. Adjusting for asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, mobility mode, race, and season, there was a significant linear trend between greater SWLS scores and quartiles of time spent away from the home or yard ( P =.0002). SWLS score was greater if participating in organized sports ( P =.01), although was not significantly greater with planned exercise ( P =.093). Planned exercise was associated with a reduced odds ratio (OR) of dyspnea (.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], .34–.95; P =.032), but organized sports was not ( P =.265). Dyspnea was not significantly increased in persons who spent the fewest hours outside their home or yard (≤7h) compared with people who spent the most hours outside their home or yard (>23h) (OR=1.69; 95% CI, 0.83–3.44; P =.145). Conclusions In SCI, a planned exercise program is associated with less dyspnea. An Active Lifestyle characterized by greater time spent away from home or yard and sports participation is associated with greater SWLS scores.