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Activity Phase

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Activity Phase – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Jan Born – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • spindle Activity Phase locked to sleep slow oscillations
    NeuroImage, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jens G Klinzing, Matthias Molle, Frederik D Weber, Gernot G Supp, Jorg F Hipp, Andreas K Engel, Jan Born
    Abstract:

    The <1Hz slow oscillation (SO) and spindles are hallmarks of mammalian non-rapid eye movement and slow wave sleep. Spindle Activity occurring Phase-locked to the SO is considered a candidate mediator of memory consolidation during sleep. We used source localization of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) and electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings from 11 sleeping human subjects for an in-depth analysis of the temporal and spatial properties of sleep spindles co-occurring with SOs. Slow oscillations and spindles were identified in the EEG and related to the MEG signal, providing enhanced spatial resolution. In the temporal domain, we confirmed a Phase-locking of classical 12-15Hz fast spindle Activity to the depolarizing SO up-state and of 9-12Hz slow spindle Activity to the up-to-down-state transition of the SO. In the spatial domain, we show a broad spread of spindle Activity, with less distinct anterior-posterior separation of fast and slow spindles than commonly seen in the EEG. We further tested a prediction of current memory consolidation models, namely the existence of a spatial bias of SOs over sleep spindles as a mechanism to promote localized neuronal synchronization and plasticity. In contrast to that prediction, a comparison of SOs dominating over the left vs. right hemisphere did not reveal any signs of a concurrent lateralization of spindle Activity co-occurring with these SOs. Our data are consistent with the concept of the neocortical SO exerting top-down control over thalamic spindle generation. However, they call into question the notion that SOs locally coordinate spindles and thereby inform spindle-related memory processing.

  • Spindle Activity Phase-locked to sleep slow oscillations.
    NeuroImage, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jens G Klinzing, Matthias Molle, Frederik D Weber, Gernot G Supp, Jorg F Hipp, Andreas K Engel, Jan Born
    Abstract:

    The

Jens G Klinzing – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • spindle Activity Phase locked to sleep slow oscillations
    NeuroImage, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jens G Klinzing, Matthias Molle, Frederik D Weber, Gernot G Supp, Jorg F Hipp, Andreas K Engel, Jan Born
    Abstract:

    The <1Hz slow oscillation (SO) and spindles are hallmarks of mammalian non-rapid eye movement and slow wave sleep. Spindle Activity occurring Phase-locked to the SO is considered a candidate mediator of memory consolidation during sleep. We used source localization of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) and electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings from 11 sleeping human subjects for an in-depth analysis of the temporal and spatial properties of sleep spindles co-occurring with SOs. Slow oscillations and spindles were identified in the EEG and related to the MEG signal, providing enhanced spatial resolution. In the temporal domain, we confirmed a Phase-locking of classical 12-15Hz fast spindle Activity to the depolarizing SO up-state and of 9-12Hz slow spindle Activity to the up-to-down-state transition of the SO. In the spatial domain, we show a broad spread of spindle Activity, with less distinct anterior-posterior separation of fast and slow spindles than commonly seen in the EEG. We further tested a prediction of current memory consolidation models, namely the existence of a spatial bias of SOs over sleep spindles as a mechanism to promote localized neuronal synchronization and plasticity. In contrast to that prediction, a comparison of SOs dominating over the left vs. right hemisphere did not reveal any signs of a concurrent lateralization of spindle Activity co-occurring with these SOs. Our data are consistent with the concept of the neocortical SO exerting top-down control over thalamic spindle generation. However, they call into question the notion that SOs locally coordinate spindles and thereby inform spindle-related memory processing.

  • Spindle Activity Phase-locked to sleep slow oscillations.
    NeuroImage, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jens G Klinzing, Matthias Molle, Frederik D Weber, Gernot G Supp, Jorg F Hipp, Andreas K Engel, Jan Born
    Abstract:

    The

Andreas K Engel – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • spindle Activity Phase locked to sleep slow oscillations
    NeuroImage, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jens G Klinzing, Matthias Molle, Frederik D Weber, Gernot G Supp, Jorg F Hipp, Andreas K Engel, Jan Born
    Abstract:

    The <1Hz slow oscillation (SO) and spindles are hallmarks of mammalian non-rapid eye movement and slow wave sleep. Spindle Activity occurring Phase-locked to the SO is considered a candidate mediator of memory consolidation during sleep. We used source localization of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) and electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings from 11 sleeping human subjects for an in-depth analysis of the temporal and spatial properties of sleep spindles co-occurring with SOs. Slow oscillations and spindles were identified in the EEG and related to the MEG signal, providing enhanced spatial resolution. In the temporal domain, we confirmed a Phase-locking of classical 12-15Hz fast spindle Activity to the depolarizing SO up-state and of 9-12Hz slow spindle Activity to the up-to-down-state transition of the SO. In the spatial domain, we show a broad spread of spindle Activity, with less distinct anterior-posterior separation of fast and slow spindles than commonly seen in the EEG. We further tested a prediction of current memory consolidation models, namely the existence of a spatial bias of SOs over sleep spindles as a mechanism to promote localized neuronal synchronization and plasticity. In contrast to that prediction, a comparison of SOs dominating over the left vs. right hemisphere did not reveal any signs of a concurrent lateralization of spindle Activity co-occurring with these SOs. Our data are consistent with the concept of the neocortical SO exerting top-down control over thalamic spindle generation. However, they call into question the notion that SOs locally coordinate spindles and thereby inform spindle-related memory processing.

  • Spindle Activity Phase-locked to sleep slow oscillations.
    NeuroImage, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jens G Klinzing, Matthias Molle, Frederik D Weber, Gernot G Supp, Jorg F Hipp, Andreas K Engel, Jan Born
    Abstract:

    The

Jorg F Hipp – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • spindle Activity Phase locked to sleep slow oscillations
    NeuroImage, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jens G Klinzing, Matthias Molle, Frederik D Weber, Gernot G Supp, Jorg F Hipp, Andreas K Engel, Jan Born
    Abstract:

    The <1Hz slow oscillation (SO) and spindles are hallmarks of mammalian non-rapid eye movement and slow wave sleep. Spindle Activity occurring Phase-locked to the SO is considered a candidate mediator of memory consolidation during sleep. We used source localization of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) and electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings from 11 sleeping human subjects for an in-depth analysis of the temporal and spatial properties of sleep spindles co-occurring with SOs. Slow oscillations and spindles were identified in the EEG and related to the MEG signal, providing enhanced spatial resolution. In the temporal domain, we confirmed a Phase-locking of classical 12-15Hz fast spindle Activity to the depolarizing SO up-state and of 9-12Hz slow spindle Activity to the up-to-down-state transition of the SO. In the spatial domain, we show a broad spread of spindle Activity, with less distinct anterior-posterior separation of fast and slow spindles than commonly seen in the EEG. We further tested a prediction of current memory consolidation models, namely the existence of a spatial bias of SOs over sleep spindles as a mechanism to promote localized neuronal synchronization and plasticity. In contrast to that prediction, a comparison of SOs dominating over the left vs. right hemisphere did not reveal any signs of a concurrent lateralization of spindle Activity co-occurring with these SOs. Our data are consistent with the concept of the neocortical SO exerting top-down control over thalamic spindle generation. However, they call into question the notion that SOs locally coordinate spindles and thereby inform spindle-related memory processing.

  • Spindle Activity Phase-locked to sleep slow oscillations.
    NeuroImage, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jens G Klinzing, Matthias Molle, Frederik D Weber, Gernot G Supp, Jorg F Hipp, Andreas K Engel, Jan Born
    Abstract:

    The

Matthias Molle – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • spindle Activity Phase locked to sleep slow oscillations
    NeuroImage, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jens G Klinzing, Matthias Molle, Frederik D Weber, Gernot G Supp, Jorg F Hipp, Andreas K Engel, Jan Born
    Abstract:

    The <1Hz slow oscillation (SO) and spindles are hallmarks of mammalian non-rapid eye movement and slow wave sleep. Spindle Activity occurring Phase-locked to the SO is considered a candidate mediator of memory consolidation during sleep. We used source localization of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) and electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings from 11 sleeping human subjects for an in-depth analysis of the temporal and spatial properties of sleep spindles co-occurring with SOs. Slow oscillations and spindles were identified in the EEG and related to the MEG signal, providing enhanced spatial resolution. In the temporal domain, we confirmed a Phase-locking of classical 12-15Hz fast spindle Activity to the depolarizing SO up-state and of 9-12Hz slow spindle Activity to the up-to-down-state transition of the SO. In the spatial domain, we show a broad spread of spindle Activity, with less distinct anterior-posterior separation of fast and slow spindles than commonly seen in the EEG. We further tested a prediction of current memory consolidation models, namely the existence of a spatial bias of SOs over sleep spindles as a mechanism to promote localized neuronal synchronization and plasticity. In contrast to that prediction, a comparison of SOs dominating over the left vs. right hemisphere did not reveal any signs of a concurrent lateralization of spindle Activity co-occurring with these SOs. Our data are consistent with the concept of the neocortical SO exerting top-down control over thalamic spindle generation. However, they call into question the notion that SOs locally coordinate spindles and thereby inform spindle-related memory processing.

  • Spindle Activity Phase-locked to sleep slow oscillations.
    NeuroImage, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jens G Klinzing, Matthias Molle, Frederik D Weber, Gernot G Supp, Jorg F Hipp, Andreas K Engel, Jan Born
    Abstract:

    The