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Bryan A Endress – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • distribution and population patterns of the threatened palm brahea Aculeata in a tropical dry forest in sonora mexico
    Forest Ecology and Management, 2011
    Co-Authors: Leonel Lopeztoledo, Christa M Horn, Bryan A Endress
    Abstract:

    The use of non-timber forest products (NTFPs) has great potential for the conservation of natural resources and rural development. Palms are important NTFPs, providing numerous products, including leaves. The harvest of palm leaves rarely results in the immediate death of individuals and can be considered one example of the sustainable use of forest resources. However, in most cases basic ecological information, such as distribution and abundance of the species is unknown, as is information on the ecological implications of human impacts, such as leaf harvest and livestock grazing. In the tropical dry forests of northwest Mexico, leaves from the threatened palm Brahea Aculeata are harvested for roofing material and represent an important NTFP. In this study, we assessed the distribution and abundance patterns of this species across 52 plots in the tropical dry forest of Sierra de Alamos-Rio Cuchujaqui Reserve (SARCR) in Sonora, Mexico. We also evaluated patterns of leaf harvest and cattle browse intensity on palm populations. We found that B. Aculeata density is highly variable across the landscape with a mean (±SE) of 121.7 ± 36.3 ha −1 . Results indicate that B. Aculeata is primarily distributed near to arroyos and rivers. The highest densities were found in sites with low incidence radiation (<0.06 MJ cm−2) and narrow stream width of arroyos/rivers (<9.5 m). Palm abundance also varied within the plots, and B. Aculeata attained its highest densities near to the arroyo edge (first 20 m from the edge), perhaps indicating a microhabitat effect on palm demography. Overall, fewer than 6% of the stems were seedlings. Leaf harvesting and browsing appear to affect demographic vital rates of the species; specifically we found a significant effect of harvesting and browsing activity on the proportion of reproductive active adults. Thus, low levels of seedlings in the populations may be the result of reduced fruit production by adults and higher mortality rates of seedlings due to livestock herbivory. Result from interviews with land owners also indicated that past land use, especially along arroyos might also have important impacts on the observed distribution, low densities and absence of recruitment in some areas. We believe current distribution and abundance of NTFP, such as B. Aculeata at SARCR may be a result of combined effects of environmental factors and human impacts. Results from this study will be used to develop appropriate conservation, management and restoration plans of B. Aculeata in the area.

  • Distribution and population patterns of the threatened palm Brahea Aculeata in a tropical dry forest in Sonora, Mexico
    Forest Ecology and Management, 2011
    Co-Authors: Leonel Lopez-toledo, Christa M Horn, Bryan A Endress
    Abstract:

    The use of non-timber forest products (NTFPs) has great potential for the conservation of natural resources and rural development. Palms are important NTFPs, providing numerous products, including leaves. The harvest of palm leaves rarely results in the immediate death of individuals and can be considered one example of the sustainable use of forest resources. However, in most cases basic ecological information, such as distribution and abundance of the species is unknown, as is information on the ecological implications of human impacts, such as leaf harvest and livestock grazing. In the tropical dry forests of northwest Mexico, leaves from the threatened palm Brahea Aculeata are harvested for roofing material and represent an important NTFP. In this study, we assessed the distribution and abundance patterns of this species across 52 plots in the tropical dry forest of Sierra de Alamos-Rio Cuchujaqui Reserve (SARCR) in Sonora, Mexico. We also evaluated patterns of leaf harvest and cattle browse intensity on palm populations. We found that B. Aculeata density is highly variable across the landscape with a mean (±SE) of 121.7 ± 36.3 ha −1 . Results indicate that B. Aculeata is primarily distributed near to arroyos and rivers. The highest densities were found in sites with low incidence radiation (

Shujun Wei – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • comparative mitogenomics and phylogenetics of the stinging wasps hymenoptera Aculeata
    Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 2021
    Co-Authors: Xiaoyu Zheng, Lijun Cao, Pengyan Chen, Xuexin Chen, Kees Van Achterberg, Ary A Hoffmann, Jingxian Liu, Shujun Wei
    Abstract:

    Abstract The stinging wasps (Hymenoptera: Aculeata) include diverse groups such as vespid wasps, ants and bees. Phylogenetic relationships among major lineages of stinging wasps have been inferred from molecular and morphological data. However, the genomic features of the mitochondrial genomes and their phylogenetic utility remain to be explored. In this study, we determined 23 mitochondrial genomes from the Aculeata. Four Mutillidae species showed relatively low A+T content compared to other species of the Aculeata (69.7%-77.4%). Eleven out of 44 species, mainly from the Chrysididae and the Pompilidae, showed reversals of GC skews. Gene rearrangements occurred across the species. Patterns of tRNA rearrangement were conserved in some groups, including the Chrysididae, Bethylidae, Pompilidae, Scolioidea and Vespoidea. Rearrangement of protein-coding genes were found in 12 out of 44 species of the Aculeata, including all four species from the Chrysididae, both species from the Bethylidae, one species from the Dryinidae, all three Scolioidea species and two Apoidea species. Phylogenetic inference showed a long branch in species with unusual genomic features, such as in the Mutillidae and Bethylidae. By excluding these species, we found paraphyly of the Chrysidoidea and a sister group relationship between the Formicoidea and Vespoidea. These results improve our understanding of the evolution of mitochondrial genomes in the Aculeata and, in general, the evolution across this subclade.

Christa M Horn – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • distribution and population patterns of the threatened palm brahea Aculeata in a tropical dry forest in sonora mexico
    Forest Ecology and Management, 2011
    Co-Authors: Leonel Lopeztoledo, Christa M Horn, Bryan A Endress
    Abstract:

    The use of non-timber forest products (NTFPs) has great potential for the conservation of natural resources and rural development. Palms are important NTFPs, providing numerous products, including leaves. The harvest of palm leaves rarely results in the immediate death of individuals and can be considered one example of the sustainable use of forest resources. However, in most cases basic ecological information, such as distribution and abundance of the species is unknown, as is information on the ecological implications of human impacts, such as leaf harvest and livestock grazing. In the tropical dry forests of northwest Mexico, leaves from the threatened palm Brahea Aculeata are harvested for roofing material and represent an important NTFP. In this study, we assessed the distribution and abundance patterns of this species across 52 plots in the tropical dry forest of Sierra de Alamos-Rio Cuchujaqui Reserve (SARCR) in Sonora, Mexico. We also evaluated patterns of leaf harvest and cattle browse intensity on palm populations. We found that B. Aculeata density is highly variable across the landscape with a mean (±SE) of 121.7 ± 36.3 ha −1 . Results indicate that B. Aculeata is primarily distributed near to arroyos and rivers. The highest densities were found in sites with low incidence radiation (<0.06 MJ cm−2) and narrow stream width of arroyos/rivers (<9.5 m). Palm abundance also varied within the plots, and B. Aculeata attained its highest densities near to the arroyo edge (first 20 m from the edge), perhaps indicating a microhabitat effect on palm demography. Overall, fewer than 6% of the stems were seedlings. Leaf harvesting and browsing appear to affect demographic vital rates of the species; specifically we found a significant effect of harvesting and browsing activity on the proportion of reproductive active adults. Thus, low levels of seedlings in the populations may be the result of reduced fruit production by adults and higher mortality rates of seedlings due to livestock herbivory. Result from interviews with land owners also indicated that past land use, especially along arroyos might also have important impacts on the observed distribution, low densities and absence of recruitment in some areas. We believe current distribution and abundance of NTFP, such as B. Aculeata at SARCR may be a result of combined effects of environmental factors and human impacts. Results from this study will be used to develop appropriate conservation, management and restoration plans of B. Aculeata in the area.

  • Distribution and population patterns of the threatened palm Brahea Aculeata in a tropical dry forest in Sonora, Mexico
    Forest Ecology and Management, 2011
    Co-Authors: Leonel Lopez-toledo, Christa M Horn, Bryan A Endress
    Abstract:

    The use of non-timber forest products (NTFPs) has great potential for the conservation of natural resources and rural development. Palms are important NTFPs, providing numerous products, including leaves. The harvest of palm leaves rarely results in the immediate death of individuals and can be considered one example of the sustainable use of forest resources. However, in most cases basic ecological information, such as distribution and abundance of the species is unknown, as is information on the ecological implications of human impacts, such as leaf harvest and livestock grazing. In the tropical dry forests of northwest Mexico, leaves from the threatened palm Brahea Aculeata are harvested for roofing material and represent an important NTFP. In this study, we assessed the distribution and abundance patterns of this species across 52 plots in the tropical dry forest of Sierra de Alamos-Rio Cuchujaqui Reserve (SARCR) in Sonora, Mexico. We also evaluated patterns of leaf harvest and cattle browse intensity on palm populations. We found that B. Aculeata density is highly variable across the landscape with a mean (±SE) of 121.7 ± 36.3 ha −1 . Results indicate that B. Aculeata is primarily distributed near to arroyos and rivers. The highest densities were found in sites with low incidence radiation (

Leonel Lopez-toledo – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Distribution and population patterns of the threatened palm Brahea Aculeata in a tropical dry forest in Sonora, Mexico
    Forest Ecology and Management, 2011
    Co-Authors: Leonel Lopez-toledo, Christa M Horn, Bryan A Endress
    Abstract:

    The use of non-timber forest products (NTFPs) has great potential for the conservation of natural resources and rural development. Palms are important NTFPs, providing numerous products, including leaves. The harvest of palm leaves rarely results in the immediate death of individuals and can be considered one example of the sustainable use of forest resources. However, in most cases basic ecological information, such as distribution and abundance of the species is unknown, as is information on the ecological implications of human impacts, such as leaf harvest and livestock grazing. In the tropical dry forests of northwest Mexico, leaves from the threatened palm Brahea Aculeata are harvested for roofing material and represent an important NTFP. In this study, we assessed the distribution and abundance patterns of this species across 52 plots in the tropical dry forest of Sierra de Alamos-Rio Cuchujaqui Reserve (SARCR) in Sonora, Mexico. We also evaluated patterns of leaf harvest and cattle browse intensity on palm populations. We found that B. Aculeata density is highly variable across the landscape with a mean (±SE) of 121.7 ± 36.3 ha −1 . Results indicate that B. Aculeata is primarily distributed near to arroyos and rivers. The highest densities were found in sites with low incidence radiation (

Xiaoyu Zheng – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • comparative mitogenomics and phylogenetics of the stinging wasps hymenoptera Aculeata
    Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 2021
    Co-Authors: Xiaoyu Zheng, Lijun Cao, Pengyan Chen, Xuexin Chen, Kees Van Achterberg, Ary A Hoffmann, Jingxian Liu, Shujun Wei
    Abstract:

    Abstract The stinging wasps (Hymenoptera: Aculeata) include diverse groups such as vespid wasps, ants and bees. Phylogenetic relationships among major lineages of stinging wasps have been inferred from molecular and morphological data. However, the genomic features of the mitochondrial genomes and their phylogenetic utility remain to be explored. In this study, we determined 23 mitochondrial genomes from the Aculeata. Four Mutillidae species showed relatively low A+T content compared to other species of the Aculeata (69.7%-77.4%). Eleven out of 44 species, mainly from the Chrysididae and the Pompilidae, showed reversals of GC skews. Gene rearrangements occurred across the species. Patterns of tRNA rearrangement were conserved in some groups, including the Chrysididae, Bethylidae, Pompilidae, Scolioidea and Vespoidea. Rearrangement of protein-coding genes were found in 12 out of 44 species of the Aculeata, including all four species from the Chrysididae, both species from the Bethylidae, one species from the Dryinidae, all three Scolioidea species and two Apoidea species. Phylogenetic inference showed a long branch in species with unusual genomic features, such as in the Mutillidae and Bethylidae. By excluding these species, we found paraphyly of the Chrysidoidea and a sister group relationship between the Formicoidea and Vespoidea. These results improve our understanding of the evolution of mitochondrial genomes in the Aculeata and, in general, the evolution across this subclade.