Acute Side Effect - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Acute Side Effect

The Experts below are selected from a list of 297 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Acute Side Effect – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Jarogniew J Luszczki – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • influence of arachidonyl 2 chloroethylamide a selective cannabinoid cb1 receptor agonist on the anticonvulsant and Acute Side Effect potentials of clobazam lacosamide and pregabalin in the maximal electroshock induced seizure model and chimney test i
    Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Magdalena Florekluszczki, Miroslaw Zagaja, Jarogniew J Luszczki
    Abstract:

    : The influence of arachidonyl-2′-chloroethylamide (ACEA – a selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist) on the anticonvulsant potency and Acute adverse-Effect potentials of clobazam, lacosamide, and pregabalin was determined in the maximal electroshock-induced seizure model and chimney test in mice. ACEA (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly enhanced the anticonvulsant potency of pregabalin in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model by decreasing the median Effective dose (ED50 ) of pregabalin from 125.39 to 78.06 mg/kg (P < 0.05). In contrast, ACEA (2.5 mg/kg) had no significant impact on the anticonvulsant potency of clobazam and lacosamide in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model. On the other hand, ACEA (2.5 mg/kg) did not affect Acute adverse Effects of clobazam, lacosamide or pregabalin, and the median toxic doses (TD50 ) for the studied anti-epileptic drugs in combination with ACEA did not differ from the TD50 values as determined for the drugs administered alone in the chimney test. In conclusion, ACEA ameliorates the pharmacological profile of pregabalin, when conSidering both the anticonvulsant and the Acute adverse Effects of the drug in preclinical study on animals. The combination of pregabalin with ACEA can be of pivotal importance for patients with epilepsy as a potentially advantageous combination if the results from this study translate into clinical settings.

  • Influence of arachidonyl‐2′‐chloroethylamide, a selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist, on the anticonvulsant and Acute SideEffect potentials of clobazam, lacosamide, and pregabalin in the maximal electroshock‐induced seizure model and chimney t
    Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Magdalena Florek-luszczki, Miroslaw Zagaja, Jarogniew J Luszczki
    Abstract:

    : The influence of arachidonyl-2′-chloroethylamide (ACEA – a selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist) on the anticonvulsant potency and Acute adverse-Effect potentials of clobazam, lacosamide, and pregabalin was determined in the maximal electroshock-induced seizure model and chimney test in mice. ACEA (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly enhanced the anticonvulsant potency of pregabalin in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model by decreasing the median Effective dose (ED50 ) of pregabalin from 125.39 to 78.06 mg/kg (P < 0.05). In contrast, ACEA (2.5 mg/kg) had no significant impact on the anticonvulsant potency of clobazam and lacosamide in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model. On the other hand, ACEA (2.5 mg/kg) did not affect Acute adverse Effects of clobazam, lacosamide or pregabalin, and the median toxic doses (TD50 ) for the studied anti-epileptic drugs in combination with ACEA did not differ from the TD50 values as determined for the drugs administered alone in the chimney test. In conclusion, ACEA ameliorates the pharmacological profile of pregabalin, when conSidering both the anticonvulsant and the Acute adverse Effects of the drug in preclinical study on animals. The combination of pregabalin with ACEA can be of pivotal importance for patients with epilepsy as a potentially advantageous combination if the results from this study translate into clinical settings.

Guoxiang Song – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Long-term results of Gamma Knife surgery for optic nerve sheath meningioma
    Journal of Neurosurgery, 2010
    Co-Authors: Dong Liu, Zhiyuan Zhang, Yipei Zhang, Xiaomin Liu, Qiang Jia, Ligao Zheng, Guoxiang Song
    Abstract:

    Object The goal of this study was to assess the long-term results of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) in patients harboring an optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Methods Thirty patients harboring an ONSM were treated with GKS between 1998 and 2003. Gamma Knife surgery was performed as the sole treatment option in 21 of these patients and resection had been performed previously in 9 patients. The mean volume of the tumor at the time of GKS was 3.6 cm3 (range 1.4–9.7 cm3), and the mean prescription peripheral dose was 13.3 Gy (range 10–17 Gy). The mean number of isocenters used to treat these lesions was 8 (range 5–14 isocenters). Results At a median follow-up of 56 months, visual acuity improved in 11 patients, remained stable in 13 patients (including 4 patients who were completely blind before GKS), and deteriorated in 6 patients. Follow-up images were available in all patients and showed tumor regression in 20 patients and stable tumor in 8 patients. Persistent imaging evidence of progression was only present in 2 patients. With the exception of reversible conjunctival edema in 4 cases, no other serious Acute Side Effect was observed. Conclusions Gamma Knife surgery provides long-term tumor control for ONSM. The results of this study add substantial evidence that GKS may definitely become a standard treatment approach in selected cases of ONSM.

  • Long-term results of Gamma Knife surgery for optic nerve sheath meningioma.
    Journal of neurosurgery, 2010
    Co-Authors: Dong Liu, Zhiyuan Zhang, Yipei Zhang, Xiaomin Liu, Qiang Jia, Ligao Zheng, Guoxiang Song
    Abstract:

    The goal of this study was to assess the long-term results of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) in patients harboring an optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Thirty patients harboring an ONSM were treated with GKS between 1998 and 2003. Gamma Knife surgery was performed as the sole treatment option in 21 of these patients and resection had been performed previously in 9 patients. The mean volume of the tumor at the time of GKS was 3.6 cm(3) (range 1.4-9.7 cm(3)), and the mean prescription peripheral dose was 13.3 Gy (range 10-17 Gy). The mean number of isocenters used to treat these lesions was 8 (range 5-14 isocenters). At a median follow-up of 56 months, visual acuity improved in 11 patients, remained stable in 13 patients (including 4 patients who were completely blind before GKS), and deteriorated in 6 patients. Follow-up images were available in all patients and showed tumor regression in 20 patients and stable tumor in 8 patients. Persistent imaging evidence of progression was only present in 2 patients. With the exception of reversible conjunctival edema in 4 cases, no other serious Acute Side Effect was observed. Gamma Knife surgery provides long-term tumor control for ONSM. The results of this study add substantial evidence that GKS may definitely become a standard treatment approach in selected cases of ONSM.

  • Gamma Knife surgery in the management of orbital tumors.
    Journal of neurosurgery, 2010
    Co-Authors: Dong Liu, Zhiyuan Zhang, Yipei Zhang, Xiaomin Liu, Qiang Jia, Ligao Zheng, Guoxiang Song
    Abstract:

    The authors evaluated the results they obtained using Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) in patients with orbital tumors. This is a retrospective clinical evaluation of 202 patients with orbital tumors who were treated with GKS between September 1995 and October 2008. The series included 84 men and 118 women with a mean age of 39.5 ± 14.6 years (range 5-85 years). The diagnoses were determined based on pathological analyses in 113 patients and presumed based on characteristic clinical and imaging findings in 89 patients. There were 84 meningiomas, 38 epithelial tumors of the lacrimal gland, 23 schwannomas, 18 malignant choroidal melanomas, 12 optic nerve gliomas, 11 orbital metastases, 10 pseudotumors of the orbit, 3 retinoblastomas, and 3 cases of fibromatosis. The median target volume was 5.4 cm(3) (range 0.04-35.6 cm(3)). The tumor margin dose ranged from 10 to 40 Gy. At a median follow-up period of 34.5 ± 14.7 months (range 12-114 months), tumor shrinkage was observed in 118 patients (58.4%) and stable tumor size in 71 patients (35.1%). Regularly scheduled neuroimaging studies demonstrated evidence of tumor progression in only 13 patients (6.4%): 9 of these patients underwent repeated GKS and 4 received surgical treatment. Visual acuity was preserved in 129 patients. Seventy-two patients experienced some degree of improvement in vision. Severe deterioration of visual acuity was found in 18 of 147 patients who had useful vision before treatment. Nineteen patients (9.4%) experienced transient conjunctival edema; no other serious Acute Side Effect was observed. Gamma Knife surgery provides an Effective management strategy in patients with orbital tumors; it achieves excellent preservation of neurological function and is associated with few treatment-related complications.

Miroslaw Zagaja – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • influence of arachidonyl 2 chloroethylamide a selective cannabinoid cb1 receptor agonist on the anticonvulsant and Acute Side Effect potentials of clobazam lacosamide and pregabalin in the maximal electroshock induced seizure model and chimney test i
    Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Magdalena Florekluszczki, Miroslaw Zagaja, Jarogniew J Luszczki
    Abstract:

    : The influence of arachidonyl-2′-chloroethylamide (ACEA – a selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist) on the anticonvulsant potency and Acute adverse-Effect potentials of clobazam, lacosamide, and pregabalin was determined in the maximal electroshock-induced seizure model and chimney test in mice. ACEA (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly enhanced the anticonvulsant potency of pregabalin in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model by decreasing the median Effective dose (ED50 ) of pregabalin from 125.39 to 78.06 mg/kg (P < 0.05). In contrast, ACEA (2.5 mg/kg) had no significant impact on the anticonvulsant potency of clobazam and lacosamide in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model. On the other hand, ACEA (2.5 mg/kg) did not affect Acute adverse Effects of clobazam, lacosamide or pregabalin, and the median toxic doses (TD50 ) for the studied anti-epileptic drugs in combination with ACEA did not differ from the TD50 values as determined for the drugs administered alone in the chimney test. In conclusion, ACEA ameliorates the pharmacological profile of pregabalin, when conSidering both the anticonvulsant and the Acute adverse Effects of the drug in preclinical study on animals. The combination of pregabalin with ACEA can be of pivotal importance for patients with epilepsy as a potentially advantageous combination if the results from this study translate into clinical settings.

  • Influence of arachidonyl‐2′‐chloroethylamide, a selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist, on the anticonvulsant and Acute SideEffect potentials of clobazam, lacosamide, and pregabalin in the maximal electroshock‐induced seizure model and chimney t
    Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Magdalena Florek-luszczki, Miroslaw Zagaja, Jarogniew J Luszczki
    Abstract:

    : The influence of arachidonyl-2′-chloroethylamide (ACEA – a selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist) on the anticonvulsant potency and Acute adverse-Effect potentials of clobazam, lacosamide, and pregabalin was determined in the maximal electroshock-induced seizure model and chimney test in mice. ACEA (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly enhanced the anticonvulsant potency of pregabalin in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model by decreasing the median Effective dose (ED50 ) of pregabalin from 125.39 to 78.06 mg/kg (P < 0.05). In contrast, ACEA (2.5 mg/kg) had no significant impact on the anticonvulsant potency of clobazam and lacosamide in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model. On the other hand, ACEA (2.5 mg/kg) did not affect Acute adverse Effects of clobazam, lacosamide or pregabalin, and the median toxic doses (TD50 ) for the studied anti-epileptic drugs in combination with ACEA did not differ from the TD50 values as determined for the drugs administered alone in the chimney test. In conclusion, ACEA ameliorates the pharmacological profile of pregabalin, when conSidering both the anticonvulsant and the Acute adverse Effects of the drug in preclinical study on animals. The combination of pregabalin with ACEA can be of pivotal importance for patients with epilepsy as a potentially advantageous combination if the results from this study translate into clinical settings.