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Ad Libitum Feeding

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Daniel H. Bessesen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Appetite‐Related Responses to OverFeeding and Longitudinal Weight Change in Obesity‐Prone and Obesity‐Resistant Adults
    Obesity, 2020
    Co-Authors: Halliday Tanya, Marc-andre Cornier, Corey A. Rynders, Elizabeth Thomas, Bergouignan Audrey, Zhaoxing Pan, Elizabeth Kealey, Daniel H. Bessesen
    Abstract:

    Objective Appetite responses to 3 days of overFeeding (OF) were examined as correlates of longitudinal weight change in Adults classified as obesity prone (OP) or obesity resistant (OR). Methods OP (n = 22) and OR (n = 30) Adults consumed a controlled eucaloric and OF diet (140% of energy needs) for 3 days, followed by 3 days of Ad Libitum Feeding. Hunger and satiety were evaluated by visual analog scales. Ghrelin and peptide YY (PYY) levels were measured during a 24‐hour inpatient visit on day 3. Body weight and composition were measured annually for 4.0 ± 1.3 years. Results Dietary restraint and disinhibition were greater in OP than OR (mean difference: 3.5 ± 1.2 and 3.3 ± 0.9, respectively; P

  • The effects of short-term overFeeding on Ad Libitum energy intake in thin and reduced-obese women and men
    Appetite, 2007
    Co-Authors: Marc-andre Cornier, S.s. Von Kaenel, Daniel H. Bessesen
    Abstract:

    Individuals who appear to be resistant to weight gain in an obesigenic environment may sense positive energy balance more appropriately, influencing subsequent intake. We studied 28 thin (15 women, 13 men) and 15 reduced-obese (RO: 10 women, 5 men) individuals twice in a randomized crossover manner. Each study period included 3 days of run-in eucaloric diet, 3 days of controlled Feeding (eucaloric or 30% overFeeding), and 3 days of Ad Libitum buffet style Feeding. Energy intake (EI) was measured during Ad Libitum Feeding. Measures of appetite were obtained using visual analog scales before and after each meal. Overall, Ad Libitum EI did not differ following eucaloric or hypercaloric Feeding even in the thin cohort. When compared to their measured energy needs, subjects overconsumed in the Ad Libitum buffet style setting even after overFeeding. This effect was driven by men (both thin and RO) who overate following both eucaloric and overFeeding diets. Ad Libitum EI was more “appropriate” in women, and thin women tended to reduce their EI after overFeeding. While overFeeding resulted in significant reductions in hunger and increases in satiety in the thin but not the RO individuals, these responses did not predict subsequent EI. In summary, buffet style Ad Libitum Feeding promotes excess EI in men even after overFeeding and regardless of their propensity to remain thin. While women appear not to overconsume in a buffet style setting, they do not undereat in response to overFeeding despite significant changes in appetite.

Yuki Aikawa – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Jump Exercise and Food Restriction on Bone Parameters in Young Female Rats
    Calcified tissue international, 2019
    Co-Authors: Yuki Aikawa, Yusuke Wakasugi, Takahiro Narukawa, Takenori Yamashita, Nobuaki Sasai, Yoshihisa Umemura, Naomi Omi, Makoto Ohtsuki
    Abstract:

    We examined the effect of jump exercise on bone parameters in young female rats under food restriction. Seven-week-old female rats were divided into four groups: a sedentary and Ad Libitum Feeding group (n = 10), a jump exercise and Ad Libitum Feeding group (n = 9), a sedentary and 30% food restriction group (n = 9), and a jump exercise and 30% food restriction group (n = 10). The jump groups jumped 20 times/day, 5 times/week. The experiment lasted for 13 weeks. There were no interactions of jump exercise and food restriction on bone. Jump exercise under food restriction conditions induced higher bone strength, bone mineral content, bone area, bone minemineral density (BMD), and cortical bone volume in young female rats, similar to rats under Ad Libitum Feeding conditions. Bone strength parameters were not significantly different between Ad Libitum intake and food restriction with jump exercise training; however, BMD, bone size, and bone mass in the food restriction groups did not reach the levels of those in the Ad Libitum conditions group with jump exercise training. Neither jump exercise nor food restriction hAd a significant effect on serum estrAdiol or IGF-1. Our study reveals jump exercise attenuates loss of biomechanical properties and some bone sites with food restriction in young female rats.

  • the interaction of voluntary running exercise and food restriction induces low bone strength and low bone mineral density in young female rats
    Calcified Tissue International, 2015
    Co-Authors: Yuki Aikawa, Umon Agata, Yuya Kakutani, Michito Higano, Satoshi Hattori, Hitomi Ogata, Ikuko Ezawa
    Abstract:

    There is a concern that the combination of exercise with food intake reduction has a risk of reducing bone strength and bone mass in young female athletes. We examined the influence of the interaction of voluntary running exercise and food restriction on bone in young female rats. Seven-week-old female Sprague–Dawley rats were divided into four groups: the sedentary and Ad Libitum Feeding group (SED), voluntary running exercise and Ad Libitum Feeding group (EX), sedentary and 30 % food restriction group (SED-FR), and voluntary running exercise and 30 % food restriction group (EX-FR). The experiment lasted 12 weeks. Statistical analysis was carried out by two-way analysis of variance with exercise and restriction as the between-subjects factors. As a result, there were significant interactions of running and restriction on energy availability, breaking force, breaking energy, and bone minemineral density (BMD). Breaking force and energy in the EX group were significantly higher than in the SED group; breaking force and energy were significantly lower in the EX-FR group than in the EX group, and breaking force in the EX-FR group was significantly lower than that in the SED-FR group. BMD in the EX-FR group was significantly lower than in the EX and SED-FR groups. These results suggest that food restriction induced low bone strength in young female rats engaging in voluntary running exercise. Also, through the interaction of exercise and food restriction, voluntary running exercise combined food restriction, unlike Ad Libitum Feeding conditions, induced low bone strength, and low BMD in young female rats.

Yusaku Iwasaki – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • peripheral circAdian rhythms in the liver and white Adipose tissue of mice are attenuated by constant light and restored by time restricted Feeding
    PLOS ONE, 2020
    Co-Authors: Daisuke Yamamuro, Manabu Takahashi, Shuichi Nagashima, Tetsuji Wakabayashi, Hisataka Yamazaki, Akihito Takei, Shoko Takei, Kent Sakai, Ken Ebihara, Yusaku Iwasaki
    Abstract:

    Disturbance of circAdian rhythms underlies various metabolic diseases. Constant light exposure (LL) is known to disrupt both central and peripheral circAdian rhythms. Here, we attempted to determine whether the effects of LL are different between various peripheral tissues and whether time-restricted Feeding restores the circAdian rhythms especially in white Adipose tissue (WAT). Six-week-old mice were subjected to three Feeding regimes: Ad Libitum Feeding under light/dark phase (LD), Ad Libitum Feeding under LL cycle, and restricted Feeding at night-time under LL cycle with a normal chow. After 3 weeks, we compared body weight, food intake, plasma levels of lipids and glucose, and the expression patterns of the clock genes and the genes involved in lipid metabolism in the liver and WAT. The mice kept under LL with or without time-restricted Feeding were 5.2% heavier (p<0.001, n = 16) than the mice kept under LD even though the food intakes of the two groups were the same. Food intake occurred mostly in the dark phase. LL disrupted this pattern, causing disruptions in circAdian rhythms of plasma levels of triglycerides (TG) and glucose. Time-restricted Feeding partially restored the rhythms. LL eliminated the circAdian rhythms of the expression of the clock genes as well as most of the genes involved in lipid metabolism in both liver and WAT. More notably, LL markedly decreased not only the amplitude but also the average levels of the expression of the genes in the liver, but not in the WAT, suggesting that transcription in the liver is sensitive to constant light exposure. Time-restricted Feeding restored the circAdian rhythms of most of the genes to various degrees in both liver and WAT. In conclusion, LL disrupted the peripheral circAdian rhythms more severely in liver than in WAT. Time-restricted Feeding restored the circAdian rhythms in both tissues.

  • Peripheral circAdian rhythms in the liver and white Adipose tissue of mice are attenuated by constant light and restored by time-restricted Feeding.
    PloS one, 2020
    Co-Authors: Daisuke Yamamuro, Manabu Takahashi, Shuichi Nagashima, Tetsuji Wakabayashi, Hisataka Yamazaki, Akihito Takei, Shoko Takei, Kent Sakai, Ken Ebihara, Yusaku Iwasaki
    Abstract:

    Disturbance of circAdian rhythms underlies various metabolic diseases. Constant light exposure (LL) is known to disrupt both central and peripheral circAdian rhythms. Here, we attempted to determine whether the effects of LL are different between various peripheral tissues and whether time-restricted Feeding restores the circAdian rhythms especially in white Adipose tissue (WAT). Six-week-old mice were subjected to three Feeding regimes: Ad Libitum Feeding under light/dark phase (LD), Ad Libitum Feeding under LL cycle, and restricted Feeding at night-time under LL cycle with a normal chow. After 3 weeks, we compared body weight, food intake, plasma levels of lipids and glucose, and the expression patterns of the clock genes and the genes involved in lipid metabolism in the liver and WAT. The mice kept under LL with or without time-restricted Feeding were 5.2% heavier (p

Marc-andre Cornier – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Appetite‐Related Responses to OverFeeding and Longitudinal Weight Change in Obesity‐Prone and Obesity‐Resistant Adults
    Obesity, 2020
    Co-Authors: Halliday Tanya, Marc-andre Cornier, Corey A. Rynders, Elizabeth Thomas, Bergouignan Audrey, Zhaoxing Pan, Elizabeth Kealey, Daniel H. Bessesen
    Abstract:

    Objective Appetite responses to 3 days of overFeeding (OF) were examined as correlates of longitudinal weight change in Adults classified as obesity prone (OP) or obesity resistant (OR). Methods OP (n = 22) and OR (n = 30) Adults consumed a controlled eucaloric and OF diet (140% of energy needs) for 3 days, followed by 3 days of Ad Libitum Feeding. Hunger and satiety were evaluated by visual analog scales. Ghrelin and peptide YY (PYY) levels were measured during a 24‐hour inpatient visit on day 3. Body weight and composition were measured annually for 4.0 ± 1.3 years. Results Dietary restraint and disinhibition were greater in OP than OR (mean difference: 3.5 ± 1.2 and 3.3 ± 0.9, respectively; P

  • The effects of short-term overFeeding on Ad Libitum energy intake in thin and reduced-obese women and men
    Appetite, 2007
    Co-Authors: Marc-andre Cornier, S.s. Von Kaenel, Daniel H. Bessesen
    Abstract:

    Individuals who appear to be resistant to weight gain in an obesigenic environment may sense positive energy balance more appropriately, influencing subsequent intake. We studied 28 thin (15 women, 13 men) and 15 reduced-obese (RO: 10 women, 5 men) individuals twice in a randomized crossover manner. Each study period included 3 days of run-in eucaloric diet, 3 days of controlled Feeding (eucaloric or 30% overFeeding), and 3 days of Ad Libitum buffet style Feeding. Energy intake (EI) was measured during Ad Libitum Feeding. Measures of appetite were obtained using visual analog scales before and after each meal. Overall, Ad Libitum EI did not differ following eucaloric or hypercaloric Feeding even in the thin cohort. When compared to their measured energy needs, subjects overconsumed in the Ad Libitum buffet style setting even after overFeeding. This effect was driven by men (both thin and RO) who overate following both eucaloric and overFeeding diets. Ad Libitum EI was more “appropriate” in women, and thin women tended to reduce their EI after overFeeding. While overFeeding resulted in significant reductions in hunger and increases in satiety in the thin but not the RO individuals, these responses did not predict subsequent EI. In summary, buffet style Ad Libitum Feeding promotes excess EI in men even after overFeeding and regardless of their propensity to remain thin. While women appear not to overconsume in a buffet style setting, they do not undereat in response to overFeeding despite significant changes in appetite.

Makoto Ohtsuki – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Jump Exercise and Food Restriction on Bone Parameters in Young Female Rats
    Calcified tissue international, 2019
    Co-Authors: Yuki Aikawa, Yusuke Wakasugi, Takahiro Narukawa, Takenori Yamashita, Nobuaki Sasai, Yoshihisa Umemura, Naomi Omi, Makoto Ohtsuki
    Abstract:

    We examined the effect of jump exercise on bone parameters in young female rats under food restriction. Seven-week-old female rats were divided into four groups: a sedentary and Ad Libitum Feeding group (n = 10), a jump exercise and Ad Libitum Feeding group (n = 9), a sedentary and 30% food restriction group (n = 9), and a jump exercise and 30% food restriction group (n = 10). The jump groups jumped 20 times/day, 5 times/week. The experiment lasted for 13 weeks. There were no interactions of jump exercise and food restriction on bone. Jump exercise under food restriction conditions induced higher bone strength, bone mineral content, bone area, bone mineral density (BMD), and cortical bone volume in young female rats, similar to rats under Ad Libitum Feeding conditions. Bone strength parameters were not significantly different between Ad Libitum intake and food restriction with jump exercise training; however, BMD, bone size, and bone mass in the food restriction groups did not reach the levels of those in the Ad Libitum conditions group with jump exercise training. Neither jump exercise nor food restriction hAd a significant effect on serum estrAdiol or IGF-1. Our study reveals jump exercise attenuates loss of biomechanical properties and some bone sites with food restriction in young female rats.