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Additional Compression

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F H Bassett – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Nerve injury in athletes caused by cryotherapy.
    Journal of athletic training, 1992
    Co-Authors: Terry R Malone, D L Engelhardt, J S Kirkpatrick, F H Bassett
    Abstract:

    Cryotherapy is a therapeutic modality frequently used in the treatment of athletic injuries. In very rare circumstances, inappropriate use in some individuals can lead to nerve injury resulting in temporary or permanent disability of the athlete. Six cases of cold-induced peripheral nervnerve injury from 1988 to 1991 at the Sports Medicine Center at Duke University are reported. Although disability can be severe and can render an athlete unable to compete for several months, each of these cases resolved spontaneously. Whereas the application of this modality is typically quite safe and beneficial, clinicians must be aware of the location of major peripheral nerves, the thickness of the overlying subcutaneous fat, the method of application (with inherent or Additional Compression), the duration of tissue cooling, and the possible cryotherapy sensibility of some individuals.

L. S. Dubrovinsky – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Ali Seradge – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Anatomical variation of the posterior interosseous nerve : A cadaver dissection study
    Orthopedics, 2000
    Co-Authors: Houshang Seradge, Wen Tian, Carrie Baer, Ali Seradge
    Abstract:

    An anatomical variation of the posterior interosseous nerve was found in a cadaver. The posterior interosseous nerve entered the supinator muscle 3 cm distal to the radiohumeral joint, but exited from two sites. Fifty percent of the nerve exited under the distal edge of the supinator muscle. The other 50% of the nerve pierced through the supinator muscle, 4.2 cm distal to the articular surface of the radial head and then joined the remaining posterior interosseous nerve as it emerged from the supinator muscle distally. Variations were not found concerning the order and the manner of branches to the muscles. This variation in the posterior interosseous nerve could be an Additional Compression site for this nerve and therefore responsible for some of the atypical presentations of symptoms and for partial recovery after surgical deCompression. Careful surgical dissection is recommended to avoid injury to this branch.

  • The Posterior Interosseous Nerve Anatomical Variation and Surgical Consideration – A Case Report of Cadaver Study.
    Hand surgery : an international journal devoted to hand and upper limb surgery and related research : journal of the Asia-Pacific Federation of Societ, 1999
    Co-Authors: Houshang Seradge, Wen Tian, Carrie Baer, Ali Seradge
    Abstract:

    We found an anatomical variation of the posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) in a cadaver. The PIN entered the supinator muscle 3 cm distal to the radiohumeral joint, but exited from two sites. 50% of the nerve exited under the distal edge of the supinator muscle. The other half of the nerve pierced through the supinator muscle, 4.2 cm distal to the articular surface of the radial head and then joined the remaining PIN as it emerged from the supinator muscle distally. We did not find variations concerning the order and the manner of branches to the muscles. This variation in the PIN could be an Additional Compression site for this nerve; and therefore responsible for some of the atypical presentations of symptoms and for partial recovery after surgical deCompression. A careful surgical dissection should be recommended to avoid injury to this branch.

Terry R Malone – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Nerve injury in athletes caused by cryotherapy.
    Journal of athletic training, 1992
    Co-Authors: Terry R Malone, D L Engelhardt, J S Kirkpatrick, F H Bassett
    Abstract:

    Cryotherapy is a therapeutic modality frequently used in the treatment of athletic injuries. In very rare circumstances, inappropriate use in some individuals can lead to nerve injury resulting in temporary or permanent disability of the athlete. Six cases of cold-induced peripheral nerve injury from 1988 to 1991 at the Sports Medicine Center at Duke University are reported. Although disability can be severe and can render an athlete unable to compete for several months, each of these cases resolved spontaneously. Whereas the application of this modality is typically quite safe and beneficial, clinicians must be aware of the location of major peripheral nerves, the thickness of the overlying subcutaneous fat, the method of application (with inherent or Additional Compression), the duration of tissue cooling, and the possible cryotherapy sensibility of some individuals.

Jérôme Rouquette – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • High-Pressure Studies of (Mg0.9Fe0.1)2SiO4 Olivine Using Raman Spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction, and Mössbauer Spectroscopy
    Inorganic Chemistry, 2008
    Co-Authors: Jérôme Rouquette, I. Yu. Kantor, C.a. Mccammon, V. Dmitriev, L. S. Dubrovinsky
    Abstract:

    High-pressure studies of (Mg0.9Fe0.1)2SiO4 olivine were performed at ambient temperature using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. At ∼40 GPa, a change of compressibility associated with saturation of the anisotropic Compression mechanism was detected. This change is interpreted to result from the appearance of Si2O7 dimer defects, as deduced from Raman spectroscopy; the appearance of such defects also accounts for the previously reported pressure-induced amorphization observed for this material upon Additional Compression. Furthermore, this behavior is followed by a spin crossover of Fe2+ that occurs over a wide pressure range, as revealed by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Introduction