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Additive Genetic Effects

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Rohan H. C. Palmer – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The etiology of DSM-5 alcohol use disorder: Evidence of shared and non-shared Additive Genetic Effects
    Drug and alcohol dependence, 2019
    Co-Authors: Rohan H. C. Palmer, Leslie A. Brick, John E. Mcgeary, Matthew C. Keller, Yi-ling Chou, Arpana Agrawal, Andrew C. Heath, Laura J. Bierut, Eric O. Johnson, Sarah M. Hartz
    Abstract:

    Abstract Background Alcoholism is a multifactorial disorder influenced by multiple gene loci, each with small effect. Studies suggest shared Genetic influences across DSM-IV alcohol dependence symptoms, but shared Effects across DSM-5 alcohol use disorder remains unknown. We aimed to test the assumption of Genetic homogeneity across the 11 criteria of DSM-5 alcohol use disorder (AUD). Methods Data from 2596 alcohol using individuals of European ancestry from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment were used to examine the genomewide SNP-heritability (h2SNP) and SNP-covariance (rGSNP) between 11 DSM-5 AUD symptoms. Phenotypic relationships between symptoms were examined to confirm an underlying liability of AUD and the SNP-heritability of the observed latent trait and the co-heritabilityamong AUD symptoms was assessed using Genomic-Relatedness-Matrix-Restricted-Maximum-Likelihood. Genetic covariance among symptoms was examined using factor analysis. Results Phenotypic relationships confirmed a unidimensional underlying liability to AUD. Factor and parallel analyses of the observed Genetic variance/covariance provided evidence of Genetic homogeneity. Additive Genetic Effects on DSM-5 AUD symptoms varied from 0.10 to 0.37 and largely overlapped (rG-SNP across symptoms ranged from 0.49 – 0.92). The Additive Genetic effect on the DSM-5 AUD factor was 0.36, 0.14 for DSM-5 AUD diagnosis, and was 0.22 for DSM-5 AUD severity. Conclusions Common Genetic variants influence DSM-5 AUD symptoms. Despite evidence for a common AUD factor, the evidence of only partially overlapping Genetic Effects across AUD symptoms further substantiates the need to simultaneously model common and symptom-specific Genetic Effects in molecular Genetic studies in order to best characterize the Genetic liability.

  • evidence of shared genome wide Additive Genetic Effects on interpersonal trauma exposure and generalized vulnerability to drug dependence in a population of substance users
    Journal of Traumatic Stress, 2016
    Co-Authors: Rohan H. C. Palmer, Nicole R. Nugent, Leslie A. Brick, Cinnamon L. Bidwell, John E. Mcgeary, Matthew C. Keller
    Abstract:

    Exposure to traumatic experiences is associated with an increased risk for drug dependence and poorer response to substance abuse treatment (Claus & Kindleberger, 2002; Jaycox, Ebener, Damesek, & Becker, 2004). Despite this evidence, the reasons for the observed associations of trauma and the general tendency to be dependent upon drugs of abuse remain unclear. Data (N = 2,596) from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment were used to analyze (a) the degree to which commonly occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; minor allele frequency > 1%) in the human genome explains exposure to interpersonal traumatic experiences, and (b) the extent to which Additive Genetic Effects on trauma are shared with Additive Genetic Effects on drug dependence. Our results suggested moderate Additive Genetic influences on interpersonal trauma, h(2) SNP-Interpersonal = .47, 95% confidence interval (CI) [.10, .85], that are partially shared with Additive Genetic Effects on generalized vulnerability to drug dependence, h(2) SNP-DD = .36, 95% CI [.11, .61]; rG-SNP = .49, 95% CI [.02, .96]. Although the design/technique does not exclude the possibility that substance abuse causally increases risk for traumatic experiences (or vice versa), these findings raise the possibility that commonly occurring SNPs influence both the general tendency towards drug dependence and interpersonal trauma.

  • Evidence of Shared Genome‐Wide Additive Genetic Effects on Interpersonal Trauma Exposure and Generalized Vulnerability to Drug Dependence in a Population of Substance Users
    Journal of traumatic stress, 2016
    Co-Authors: Rohan H. C. Palmer, Nicole R. Nugent, Leslie A. Brick, Cinnamon L. Bidwell, John E. Mcgeary, Matthew C. Keller, Valerie S. Knopik
    Abstract:

    Exposure to traumatic experiences is associated with an increased risk for drug dependence and poorer response to substance abuse treatment (Claus & Kindleberger, 2002; Jaycox, Ebener, Damesek, & Becker, 2004). Despite this evidence, the reasons for the observed associations of trauma and the general tendency to be dependent upon drugs of abuse remain unclear. Data (N = 2,596) from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment were used to analyze (a) the degree to which commonly occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; minor allele frequency > 1%) in the human genome explains exposure to interpersonal traumatic experiences, and (b) the extent to which Additive Genetic Effects on trauma are shared with Additive Genetic Effects on drug dependence. Our results suggested moderate Additive Genetic influences on interpersonal trauma, h(2) SNP-Interpersonal = .47, 95% confidence interval (CI) [.10, .85], that are partially shared with Additive Genetic Effects on generalized vulnerability to drug dependence, h(2) SNP-DD = .36, 95% CI [.11, .61]; rG-SNP = .49, 95% CI [.02, .96]. Although the design/technique does not exclude the possibility that substance abuse causally increases risk for traumatic experiences (or vice versa), these findings raise the possibility that commonly occurring SNPs influence both the general tendency towards drug dependence and interpersonal trauma.

John E. Mcgeary – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The etiology of DSM-5 alcohol use disorder: Evidence of shared and non-shared Additive Genetic Effects
    Drug and alcohol dependence, 2019
    Co-Authors: Rohan H. C. Palmer, Leslie A. Brick, John E. Mcgeary, Matthew C. Keller, Yi-ling Chou, Arpana Agrawal, Andrew C. Heath, Laura J. Bierut, Eric O. Johnson, Sarah M. Hartz
    Abstract:

    Abstract Background Alcoholism is a multifactorial disorder influenced by multiple gene loci, each with small effect. Studies suggest shared Genetic influences across DSM-IV alcohol dependence symptoms, but shared Effects across DSM-5 alcohol use disorder remains unknown. We aimed to test the assumption of Genetic homogeneity across the 11 criteria of DSM-5 alcohol use disorder (AUD). Methods Data from 2596 alcohol using individuals of European ancestry from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment were used to examine the genomewide SNP-heritability (h2SNP) and SNP-covariance (rGSNP) between 11 DSM-5 AUD symptoms. Phenotypic relationships between symptoms were examined to confirm an underlying liability of AUD and the SNP-heritability of the observed latent trait and the co-heritabilityamong AUD symptoms was assessed using Genomic-Relatedness-Matrix-Restricted-Maximum-Likelihood. Genetic covariance among symptoms was examined using factor analysis. Results Phenotypic relationships confirmed a unidimensional underlying liability to AUD. Factor and parallel analyses of the observed Genetic variance/covariance provided evidence of Genetic homogeneity. Additive Genetic Effects on DSM-5 AUD symptoms varied from 0.10 to 0.37 and largely overlapped (rG-SNP across symptoms ranged from 0.49 – 0.92). The Additive Genetic effect on the DSM-5 AUD factor was 0.36, 0.14 for DSM-5 AUD diagnosis, and was 0.22 for DSM-5 AUD severity. Conclusions Common Genetic variants influence DSM-5 AUD symptoms. Despite evidence for a common AUD factor, the evidence of only partially overlapping Genetic Effects across AUD symptoms further substantiates the need to simultaneously model common and symptom-specific Genetic Effects in molecular Genetic studies in order to best characterize the Genetic liability.

  • evidence of shared genome wide Additive Genetic Effects on interpersonal trauma exposure and generalized vulnerability to drug dependence in a population of substance users
    Journal of Traumatic Stress, 2016
    Co-Authors: Rohan H. C. Palmer, Nicole R. Nugent, Leslie A. Brick, Cinnamon L. Bidwell, John E. Mcgeary, Matthew C. Keller
    Abstract:

    Exposure to traumatic experiences is associated with an increased risk for drug dependence and poorer response to substance abuse treatment (Claus & Kindleberger, 2002; Jaycox, Ebener, Damesek, & Becker, 2004). Despite this evidence, the reasons for the observed associations of trauma and the general tendency to be dependent upon drugs of abuse remain unclear. Data (N = 2,596) from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment were used to analyze (a) the degree to which commonly occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; minor allele frequency > 1%) in the human genome explains exposure to interpersonal traumatic experiences, and (b) the extent to which Additive Genetic Effects on trauma are shared with Additive Genetic Effects on drug dependence. Our results suggested moderate Additive Genetic influences on interpersonal trauma, h(2) SNP-Interpersonal = .47, 95% confidence interval (CI) [.10, .85], that are partially shared with Additive Genetic Effects on generalized vulnerability to drug dependence, h(2) SNP-DD = .36, 95% CI [.11, .61]; rG-SNP = .49, 95% CI [.02, .96]. Although the design/technique does not exclude the possibility that substance abuse causally increases risk for traumatic experiences (or vice versa), these findings raise the possibility that commonly occurring SNPs influence both the general tendency towards drug dependence and interpersonal trauma.

  • Evidence of Shared Genome‐Wide Additive Genetic Effects on Interpersonal Trauma Exposure and Generalized Vulnerability to Drug Dependence in a Population of Substance Users
    Journal of traumatic stress, 2016
    Co-Authors: Rohan H. C. Palmer, Nicole R. Nugent, Leslie A. Brick, Cinnamon L. Bidwell, John E. Mcgeary, Matthew C. Keller, Valerie S. Knopik
    Abstract:

    Exposure to traumatic experiences is associated with an increased risk for drug dependence and poorer response to substance abuse treatment (Claus & Kindleberger, 2002; Jaycox, Ebener, Damesek, & Becker, 2004). Despite this evidence, the reasons for the observed associations of trauma and the general tendency to be dependent upon drugs of abuse remain unclear. Data (N = 2,596) from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment were used to analyze (a) the degree to which commonly occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; minor allele frequency > 1%) in the human genome explains exposure to interpersonal traumatic experiences, and (b) the extent to which Additive Genetic Effects on trauma are shared with Additive Genetic Effects on drug dependence. Our results suggested moderate Additive Genetic influences on interpersonal trauma, h(2) SNP-Interpersonal = .47, 95% confidence interval (CI) [.10, .85], that are partially shared with Additive Genetic Effects on generalized vulnerability to drug dependence, h(2) SNP-DD = .36, 95% CI [.11, .61]; rG-SNP = .49, 95% CI [.02, .96]. Although the design/technique does not exclude the possibility that substance abuse causally increases risk for traumatic experiences (or vice versa), these findings raise the possibility that commonly occurring SNPs influence both the general tendency towards drug dependence and interpersonal trauma.

Matthew C. Keller – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The etiology of DSM-5 alcohol use disorder: Evidence of shared and non-shared Additive Genetic Effects
    Drug and alcohol dependence, 2019
    Co-Authors: Rohan H. C. Palmer, Leslie A. Brick, John E. Mcgeary, Matthew C. Keller, Yi-ling Chou, Arpana Agrawal, Andrew C. Heath, Laura J. Bierut, Eric O. Johnson, Sarah M. Hartz
    Abstract:

    Abstract Background Alcoholism is a multifactorial disorder influenced by multiple gene loci, each with small effect. Studies suggest shared Genetic influences across DSM-IV alcohol dependence symptoms, but shared Effects across DSM-5 alcohol use disorder remains unknown. We aimed to test the assumption of Genetic homogeneity across the 11 criteria of DSM-5 alcohol use disorder (AUD). Methods Data from 2596 alcohol using individuals of European ancestry from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment were used to examine the genomewide SNP-heritability (h2SNP) and SNP-covariance (rGSNP) between 11 DSM-5 AUD symptoms. Phenotypic relationships between symptoms were examined to confirm an underlying liability of AUD and the SNP-heritability of the observed latent trait and the co-heritabilityamong AUD symptoms was assessed using Genomic-Relatedness-Matrix-Restricted-Maximum-Likelihood. Genetic covariance among symptoms was examined using factor analysis. Results Phenotypic relationships confirmed a unidimensional underlying liability to AUD. Factor and parallel analyses of the observed Genetic variance/covariance provided evidence of Genetic homogeneity. Additive Genetic Effects on DSM-5 AUD symptoms varied from 0.10 to 0.37 and largely overlapped (rG-SNP across symptoms ranged from 0.49 – 0.92). The Additive Genetic effect on the DSM-5 AUD factor was 0.36, 0.14 for DSM-5 AUD diagnosis, and was 0.22 for DSM-5 AUD severity. Conclusions Common Genetic variants influence DSM-5 AUD symptoms. Despite evidence for a common AUD factor, the evidence of only partially overlapping Genetic Effects across AUD symptoms further substantiates the need to simultaneously model common and symptom-specific Genetic Effects in molecular Genetic studies in order to best characterize the Genetic liability.

  • evidence of shared genome wide Additive Genetic Effects on interpersonal trauma exposure and generalized vulnerability to drug dependence in a population of substance users
    Journal of Traumatic Stress, 2016
    Co-Authors: Rohan H. C. Palmer, Nicole R. Nugent, Leslie A. Brick, Cinnamon L. Bidwell, John E. Mcgeary, Matthew C. Keller
    Abstract:

    Exposure to traumatic experiences is associated with an increased risk for drug dependence and poorer response to substance abuse treatment (Claus & Kindleberger, 2002; Jaycox, Ebener, Damesek, & Becker, 2004). Despite this evidence, the reasons for the observed associations of trauma and the general tendency to be dependent upon drugs of abuse remain unclear. Data (N = 2,596) from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment were used to analyze (a) the degree to which commonly occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; minor allele frequency > 1%) in the human genome explains exposure to interpersonal traumatic experiences, and (b) the extent to which Additive Genetic Effects on trauma are shared with Additive Genetic Effects on drug dependence. Our results suggested moderate Additive Genetic influences on interpersonal trauma, h(2) SNP-Interpersonal = .47, 95% confidence interval (CI) [.10, .85], that are partially shared with Additive Genetic Effects on generalized vulnerability to drug dependence, h(2) SNP-DD = .36, 95% CI [.11, .61]; rG-SNP = .49, 95% CI [.02, .96]. Although the design/technique does not exclude the possibility that substance abuse causally increases risk for traumatic experiences (or vice versa), these findings raise the possibility that commonly occurring SNPs influence both the general tendency towards drug dependence and interpersonal trauma.

  • Evidence of Shared Genome‐Wide Additive Genetic Effects on Interpersonal Trauma Exposure and Generalized Vulnerability to Drug Dependence in a Population of Substance Users
    Journal of traumatic stress, 2016
    Co-Authors: Rohan H. C. Palmer, Nicole R. Nugent, Leslie A. Brick, Cinnamon L. Bidwell, John E. Mcgeary, Matthew C. Keller, Valerie S. Knopik
    Abstract:

    Exposure to traumatic experiences is associated with an increased risk for drug dependence and poorer response to substance abuse treatment (Claus & Kindleberger, 2002; Jaycox, Ebener, Damesek, & Becker, 2004). Despite this evidence, the reasons for the observed associations of trauma and the general tendency to be dependent upon drugs of abuse remain unclear. Data (N = 2,596) from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment were used to analyze (a) the degree to which commonly occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; minor allele frequency > 1%) in the human genome explains exposure to interpersonal traumatic experiences, and (b) the extent to which Additive Genetic Effects on trauma are shared with Additive Genetic Effects on drug dependence. Our results suggested moderate Additive Genetic influences on interpersonal trauma, h(2) SNP-Interpersonal = .47, 95% confidence interval (CI) [.10, .85], that are partially shared with Additive Genetic Effects on generalized vulnerability to drug dependence, h(2) SNP-DD = .36, 95% CI [.11, .61]; rG-SNP = .49, 95% CI [.02, .96]. Although the design/technique does not exclude the possibility that substance abuse causally increases risk for traumatic experiences (or vice versa), these findings raise the possibility that commonly occurring SNPs influence both the general tendency towards drug dependence and interpersonal trauma.

Nicole R. Nugent – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • evidence of shared genome wide Additive Genetic Effects on interpersonal trauma exposure and generalized vulnerability to drug dependence in a population of substance users
    Journal of Traumatic Stress, 2016
    Co-Authors: Rohan H. C. Palmer, Nicole R. Nugent, Leslie A. Brick, Cinnamon L. Bidwell, John E. Mcgeary, Matthew C. Keller
    Abstract:

    Exposure to traumatic experiences is associated with an increased risk for drug dependence and poorer response to substance abuse treatment (Claus & Kindleberger, 2002; Jaycox, Ebener, Damesek, & Becker, 2004). Despite this evidence, the reasons for the observed associations of trauma and the general tendency to be dependent upon drugs of abuse remain unclear. Data (N = 2,596) from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment were used to analyze (a) the degree to which commonly occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; minor allele frequency > 1%) in the human genome explains exposure to interpersonal traumatic experiences, and (b) the extent to which Additive Genetic Effects on trauma are shared with Additive Genetic Effects on drug dependence. Our results suggested moderate Additive Genetic influences on interpersonal trauma, h(2) SNP-Interpersonal = .47, 95% confidence interval (CI) [.10, .85], that are partially shared with Additive Genetic Effects on generalized vulnerability to drug dependence, h(2) SNP-DD = .36, 95% CI [.11, .61]; rG-SNP = .49, 95% CI [.02, .96]. Although the design/technique does not exclude the possibility that substance abuse causally increases risk for traumatic experiences (or vice versa), these findings raise the possibility that commonly occurring SNPs influence both the general tendency towards drug dependence and interpersonal trauma.

  • Evidence of Shared Genome‐Wide Additive Genetic Effects on Interpersonal Trauma Exposure and Generalized Vulnerability to Drug Dependence in a Population of Substance Users
    Journal of traumatic stress, 2016
    Co-Authors: Rohan H. C. Palmer, Nicole R. Nugent, Leslie A. Brick, Cinnamon L. Bidwell, John E. Mcgeary, Matthew C. Keller, Valerie S. Knopik
    Abstract:

    Exposure to traumatic experiences is associated with an increased risk for drug dependence and poorer response to substance abuse treatment (Claus & Kindleberger, 2002; Jaycox, Ebener, Damesek, & Becker, 2004). Despite this evidence, the reasons for the observed associations of trauma and the general tendency to be dependent upon drugs of abuse remain unclear. Data (N = 2,596) from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment were used to analyze (a) the degree to which commonly occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; minor allele frequency > 1%) in the human genome explains exposure to interpersonal traumatic experiences, and (b) the extent to which Additive Genetic Effects on trauma are shared with Additive Genetic Effects on drug dependence. Our results suggested moderate Additive Genetic influences on interpersonal trauma, h(2) SNP-Interpersonal = .47, 95% confidence interval (CI) [.10, .85], that are partially shared with Additive Genetic Effects on generalized vulnerability to drug dependence, h(2) SNP-DD = .36, 95% CI [.11, .61]; rG-SNP = .49, 95% CI [.02, .96]. Although the design/technique does not exclude the possibility that substance abuse causally increases risk for traumatic experiences (or vice versa), these findings raise the possibility that commonly occurring SNPs influence both the general tendency towards drug dependence and interpersonal trauma.

Leslie A. Brick – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The etiology of DSM-5 alcohol use disorder: Evidence of shared and non-shared Additive Genetic Effects
    Drug and alcohol dependence, 2019
    Co-Authors: Rohan H. C. Palmer, Leslie A. Brick, John E. Mcgeary, Matthew C. Keller, Yi-ling Chou, Arpana Agrawal, Andrew C. Heath, Laura J. Bierut, Eric O. Johnson, Sarah M. Hartz
    Abstract:

    Abstract Background Alcoholism is a multifactorial disorder influenced by multiple gene loci, each with small effect. Studies suggest shared Genetic influences across DSM-IV alcohol dependence symptoms, but shared Effects across DSM-5 alcohol use disorder remains unknown. We aimed to test the assumption of Genetic homogeneity across the 11 criteria of DSM-5 alcohol use disorder (AUD). Methods Data from 2596 alcohol using individuals of European ancestry from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment were used to examine the genomewide SNP-heritability (h2SNP) and SNP-covariance (rGSNP) between 11 DSM-5 AUD symptoms. Phenotypic relationships between symptoms were examined to confirm an underlying liability of AUD and the SNP-heritability of the observed latent trait and the co-heritabilityamong AUD symptoms was assessed using Genomic-Relatedness-Matrix-Restricted-Maximum-Likelihood. Genetic covariance among symptoms was examined using factor analysis. Results Phenotypic relationships confirmed a unidimensional underlying liability to AUD. Factor and parallel analyses of the observed Genetic variance/covariance provided evidence of Genetic homogeneity. Additive Genetic Effects on DSM-5 AUD symptoms varied from 0.10 to 0.37 and largely overlapped (rG-SNP across symptoms ranged from 0.49 – 0.92). The Additive Genetic effect on the DSM-5 AUD factor was 0.36, 0.14 for DSM-5 AUD diagnosis, and was 0.22 for DSM-5 AUD severity. Conclusions Common Genetic variants influence DSM-5 AUD symptoms. Despite evidence for a common AUD factor, the evidence of only partially overlapping Genetic Effects across AUD symptoms further substantiates the need to simultaneously model common and symptom-specific Genetic Effects in molecular Genetic studies in order to best characterize the Genetic liability.

  • evidence of shared genome wide Additive Genetic Effects on interpersonal trauma exposure and generalized vulnerability to drug dependence in a population of substance users
    Journal of Traumatic Stress, 2016
    Co-Authors: Rohan H. C. Palmer, Nicole R. Nugent, Leslie A. Brick, Cinnamon L. Bidwell, John E. Mcgeary, Matthew C. Keller
    Abstract:

    Exposure to traumatic experiences is associated with an increased risk for drug dependence and poorer response to substance abuse treatment (Claus & Kindleberger, 2002; Jaycox, Ebener, Damesek, & Becker, 2004). Despite this evidence, the reasons for the observed associations of trauma and the general tendency to be dependent upon drugs of abuse remain unclear. Data (N = 2,596) from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment were used to analyze (a) the degree to which commonly occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; minor allele frequency > 1%) in the human genome explains exposure to interpersonal traumatic experiences, and (b) the extent to which Additive Genetic Effects on trauma are shared with Additive Genetic Effects on drug dependence. Our results suggested moderate Additive Genetic influences on interpersonal trauma, h(2) SNP-Interpersonal = .47, 95% confidence interval (CI) [.10, .85], that are partially shared with Additive Genetic Effects on generalized vulnerability to drug dependence, h(2) SNP-DD = .36, 95% CI [.11, .61]; rG-SNP = .49, 95% CI [.02, .96]. Although the design/technique does not exclude the possibility that substance abuse causally increases risk for traumatic experiences (or vice versa), these findings raise the possibility that commonly occurring SNPs influence both the general tendency towards drug dependence and interpersonal trauma.

  • Evidence of Shared Genome‐Wide Additive Genetic Effects on Interpersonal Trauma Exposure and Generalized Vulnerability to Drug Dependence in a Population of Substance Users
    Journal of traumatic stress, 2016
    Co-Authors: Rohan H. C. Palmer, Nicole R. Nugent, Leslie A. Brick, Cinnamon L. Bidwell, John E. Mcgeary, Matthew C. Keller, Valerie S. Knopik
    Abstract:

    Exposure to traumatic experiences is associated with an increased risk for drug dependence and poorer response to substance abuse treatment (Claus & Kindleberger, 2002; Jaycox, Ebener, Damesek, & Becker, 2004). Despite this evidence, the reasons for the observed associations of trauma and the general tendency to be dependent upon drugs of abuse remain unclear. Data (N = 2,596) from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment were used to analyze (a) the degree to which commonly occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; minor allele frequency > 1%) in the human genome explains exposure to interpersonal traumatic experiences, and (b) the extent to which Additive Genetic Effects on trauma are shared with Additive Genetic Effects on drug dependence. Our results suggested moderate Additive Genetic influences on interpersonal trauma, h(2) SNP-Interpersonal = .47, 95% confidence interval (CI) [.10, .85], that are partially shared with Additive Genetic Effects on generalized vulnerability to drug dependence, h(2) SNP-DD = .36, 95% CI [.11, .61]; rG-SNP = .49, 95% CI [.02, .96]. Although the design/technique does not exclude the possibility that substance abuse causally increases risk for traumatic experiences (or vice versa), these findings raise the possibility that commonly occurring SNPs influence both the general tendency towards drug dependence and interpersonal trauma.