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Paul Colegrove – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • wire arc Additive Manufacturing
    Materials Science and Technology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Stewart Williams, Filomeno Martina, Adrian C. Addison, J Ding, Goncalo Pardal, Paul Colegrove
    Abstract:

    Depositing large components (>10 kg) in titanium, aluminium, steel and other metals is possible using Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing. This technology adopts arc welding tools and wire as feedstock for Additive Manufacturing purposes. High deposition rates, low material and equipment costs, and good structural integrity make Wire+Arc Additive Manufacturing a suitable candidate for replacing the current method of Manufacturing from solid billets or large forgings, especially with regards to low and medium complexity parts. A variety of components have been successfully manufactured with this process, including Ti–6Al–4V spars and landing gear assemblies, aluminium wing ribs, steel wind tunnel models and cones. Strategies on how to manage residual stress, improve mechanical properties and eliminate defects such as porosity are suggested. Finally, the benefits of non-destdestructive testing, online monitoring and in situ machining are discussed.

  • Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing
    Materials Science and Technology, 2016
    Co-Authors: S.w. Williams, Paul Colegrove, Stewart Williams, Filomeno Martina, Adrian C. Addison, J Ding, Goncalo Pardal
    Abstract:

    Depositing large components (>10 kg) in titanium, aluminium, steel and other metals is possible using Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing. This technology adopts arc welding tools and wire as feedstock for Additive Manufacturing purposes. High deposition rates, low material and equipment costs, and good structural integrity make Wire+Arc Additive Manufacturing a suitable candidate for replacing the current method of Manufacturing from solid billets or large forgings, especially with regards to low and medium complexity parts. A variety of components have been successfully manufactured with this process, including Ti–6Al–4V spars and landing gear assemblies, aluminium wing ribs, steel wind tunnel models and cones. Strategies on how to manage residual stress, improve mechanical properties and eliminate defects such as porosity are suggested. Finally, the benefits of non-destdestructive testing, online monitoring and in situ machining are discussed.

D.j. De Beer – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Additive Manufacturing FOR SUSTAINABLE CUSTOM-DESIGNED IMPLANTS
    South African Journal of Industrial Engineering, 2019
    Co-Authors: G.j. Booysen, A.f. Van Der Merwe, D.j. De Beer
    Abstract:

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) has proven to be an attractive alternative Manufacturing process compared with subtractive Manufacturing (SM). Additive Manufacturing has many advantages, such as mass customisation, less material wastage, and others listed in this article. However, the Additive Manufacturing of certified implants does not have the same degree of documentation and standardisation as the subtractive Manufacturing process. As part of this research project, the problem statement is: “In offering Additive Manufacturing as an implant Manufacturing solution, the complete process (design, Manufacturing, and post-processing) had to be investigated in order to develop a certified Manufacturing solution”.

  • IMPLEMENTING THE SOUTH AFRICAN Additive Manufacturing TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP – THE ROLE OF AN Additive Manufacturing CENTRE OF COMPETENCE
    South African Journal of Industrial Engineering, 2015
    Co-Authors: Willie Bouwer Du Preez, D.j. De Beer
    Abstract:

    The Rapid Product Development Association of South Africa (RAPDASA) expressed the need for a national Additive Manufacturing Roadmap. Consequentially, the South African Department of Science and Technology commissioned the development of a South African Additive Manufacturing Technology Roadmap. This was intended to guide role-players in identifying business opportunities, addressing technology gaps, focusing development programmes, and informing investment decisions that would enable local companies and industry sectors to become global leaders in selected areas of Additive Manufacturing. The challenge remains now for South Africa to decide on an implementation approach that will maximize the impact in the shortest possible time. This article introduces the concept of a national Additive Manufacturing Centre of Competence (AMCoC) as a primary implementation vehicle for the roadmap. The support of the current leading players in Additive Manufacturing in South Africa for such a centre of competence is shared and their key roles are indicated. A summary of the investments that the leading players have already made in the focus areas of the AMCoC over the past two decades is given as confirmation of their commitment towards the advancement of the Additive Manufacturing technology. An exposition is given of how the AMCoC could indeed become the primary initiative for achieving the agreed national goals on Additive Manufacturing. The conclusion is that investment by public and private institutions in an AMCoC would be the next step towards ensuring South Africa’s continued progress in the field.

  • implementing the south african Additive Manufacturing technology roadmap the role of an Additive Manufacturing centre of competence
    South African Journal of Industrial Engineering, 2015
    Co-Authors: Willie Bouwer Du Preez, D.j. De Beer
    Abstract:

    The Rapid Product Development Association of South Africa (RAPDASA) expressed the need for a national Additive Manufacturing Roadmap. Consequentially, the South African Department of Science and Technology commissioned the development of a South African Additive Manufacturing Technology Roadmap. This was intended to guide role-players in identifying business opportunities, addressing technology gaps, focusing development programmes, and informing investment decisions that would enable local companies and industry sectors to become global leaders in selected areas of Additive Manufacturing. The challenge remains now for South Africa to decide on an implementation approach that will maximize the impact in the shortest possible time. This article introduces the concept of a national Additive Manufacturing Centre of Competence (AMCoC) as a primary implementation vehicle for the roadmap. The support of the current leading players in Additive Manufacturing in South Africa for such a centre of competence is shared and their key roles are indicated. A summary of the investments that the leading players have already made in the focus areas of the AMCoC over the past two decades is given as confirmation of their commitment towards the advancement of the Additive Manufacturing technology. An exposition is given of how the AMCoC could indeed become the primary initiative for achieving the agreed national goals on Additive Manufacturing. The conclusion is that investment by public and private institutions in an AMCoC would be the next step towards ensuring South Africa’s continued progress in the field.

J Ding – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • wire arc Additive Manufacturing
    Materials Science and Technology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Stewart Williams, Filomeno Martina, Adrian C. Addison, J Ding, Goncalo Pardal, Paul Colegrove
    Abstract:

    Depositing large components (>10 kg) in titanium, aluminium, steel and other metals is possible using Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing. This technology adopts arc welding tools and wire as feedstock for Additive Manufacturing purposes. High deposition rates, low material and equipment costs, and good structural integrity make Wire+Arc Additive Manufacturing a suitable candidate for replacing the current method of Manufacturing from solid billets or large forgings, especially with regards to low and medium complexity parts. A variety of components have been successfully manufactured with this process, including Ti–6Al–4V spars and landing gear assemblies, aluminium wing ribs, steel wind tunnel models and cones. Strategies on how to manage residual stress, improve mechanical properties and eliminate defects such as porosity are suggested. Finally, the benefits of non-destructive testing, online monitoring and in situ machining are discussed.

  • Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing
    Materials Science and Technology, 2016
    Co-Authors: S.w. Williams, Paul Colegrove, Stewart Williams, Filomeno Martina, Adrian C. Addison, J Ding, Goncalo Pardal
    Abstract:

    Depositing large components (>10 kg) in titanium, aluminium, steel and other metals is possible using Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing. This technology adopts arc welding tools and wire as feedstock for Additive Manufacturing purposes. High deposition rates, low material and equipment costs, and good structural integrity make Wire+Arc Additive Manufacturing a suitable candidate for replacing the current method of Manufacturing from solid billets or large forgings, especially with regards to low and medium complexity parts. A variety of components have been successfully manufactured with this process, including Ti–6Al–4V spars and landing gear assemblies, aluminium wing ribs, steel wind tunnel models and cones. Strategies on how to manage residual stress, improve mechanical properties and eliminate defects such as porosity are suggested. Finally, the benefits of non-destructive testing, online monitoring and in situ machining are discussed.

Stewart Williams – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • wire arc Additive Manufacturing
    Materials Science and Technology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Stewart Williams, Filomeno Martina, Adrian C. Addison, J Ding, Goncalo Pardal, Paul Colegrove
    Abstract:

    Depositing large components (>10 kg) in titanium, aluminium, steel and other metals is possible using Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing. This technology adopts arc welding tools and wire as feedstock for Additive Manufacturing purposes. High deposition rates, low material and equipment costs, and good structural integrity make Wire+Arc Additive Manufacturing a suitable candidate for replacing the current method of Manufacturing from solid billets or large forgings, especially with regards to low and medium complexity parts. A variety of components have been successfully manufactured with this process, including Ti–6Al–4V spars and landing gear assemblies, aluminium wing ribs, steel wind tunnel models and cones. Strategies on how to manage residual stress, improve mechanical properties and eliminate defects such as porosity are suggested. Finally, the benefits of non-destructive testing, online monitoring and in situ machining are discussed.

  • Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing
    Materials Science and Technology, 2016
    Co-Authors: S.w. Williams, Paul Colegrove, Stewart Williams, Filomeno Martina, Adrian C. Addison, J Ding, Goncalo Pardal
    Abstract:

    Depositing large components (>10 kg) in titanium, aluminium, steel and other metals is possible using Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing. This technology adopts arc welding tools and wire as feedstock for Additive Manufacturing purposes. High deposition rates, low material and equipment costs, and good structural integrity make Wire+Arc Additive Manufacturing a suitable candidate for replacing the current method of Manufacturing from solid billets or large forgings, especially with regards to low and medium complexity parts. A variety of components have been successfully manufactured with this process, including Ti–6Al–4V spars and landing gear assemblies, aluminium wing ribs, steel wind tunnel models and cones. Strategies on how to manage residual stress, improve mechanical properties and eliminate defects such as porosity are suggested. Finally, the benefits of non-destructive testing, online monitoring and in situ machining are discussed.

Goncalo Pardal – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • wire arc Additive Manufacturing
    Materials Science and Technology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Stewart Williams, Filomeno Martina, Adrian C. Addison, J Ding, Goncalo Pardal, Paul Colegrove
    Abstract:

    Depositing large components (>10 kg) in titanium, aluminium, steel and other metals is possible using Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing. This technology adopts arc welding tools and wire as feedstock for Additive Manufacturing purposes. High deposition rates, low material and equipment costs, and good structural integrity make Wire+Arc Additive Manufacturing a suitable candidate for replacing the current method of Manufacturing from solid billets or large forgings, especially with regards to low and medium complexity parts. A variety of components have been successfully manufactured with this process, including Ti–6Al–4V spars and landing gear assemblies, aluminium wing ribs, steel wind tunnel models and cones. Strategies on how to manage residual stress, improve mechanical properties and eliminate defects such as porosity are suggested. Finally, the benefits of non-destructive testing, online monitoring and in situ machining are discussed.

  • Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing
    Materials Science and Technology, 2016
    Co-Authors: S.w. Williams, Paul Colegrove, Stewart Williams, Filomeno Martina, Adrian C. Addison, J Ding, Goncalo Pardal
    Abstract:

    Depositing large components (>10 kg) in titanium, aluminium, steel and other metals is possible using Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing. This technology adopts arc welding tools and wire as feedstock for Additive Manufacturing purposes. High deposition rates, low material and equipment costs, and good structural integrity make Wire+Arc Additive Manufacturing a suitable candidate for replacing the current method of Manufacturing from solid billets or large forgings, especially with regards to low and medium complexity parts. A variety of components have been successfully manufactured with this process, including Ti–6Al–4V spars and landing gear assemblies, aluminium wing ribs, steel wind tunnel models and cones. Strategies on how to manage residual stress, improve mechanical properties and eliminate defects such as porosity are suggested. Finally, the benefits of non-destructive testing, online monitoring and in situ machining are discussed.