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Adenomyomatosis

The Experts below are selected from a list of 306 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Osamu Tokunaga – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Actual status of clinical diagnosis in patients with primary gallbladder cancer associated with Adenomyomatosis
    Indian Journal of Gastroenterology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Hiroyuki Irie, Masanori Masuda, Kenji Kitahara, Atsushi Miyoshi, Kohji Miyazaki, Hirokazu Noshiro, Osamu Tokunaga

    Abstract:

    Aim The purpose of this study was to reveal differences in clinical diagnosis of gallbladder cancer among patients with or without Adenomyomatosis (ADM) by analyzing demonstrated tumor patterns on imaging and diagnostic opportunities. Methods Ninety-seven patients with gallbladder cancer were enrolled. Demonstrated imaging patterns were classified into mass lesion (ML), wall thickening (WT), and papillary lesion (PL). Clinical status during periodic follow up and other diagnostic opportunities were determined from medical records. Results All Adenomyomatosis-associated cases were diagnosed at the T2 or higher stage. The distribution of demonstrated imaging patterns was significantly different between the Adenomyomatosis-associated and non-Adenomyomatosis-associated groups ( p  = 0.0002). No Adenomyomatosis-associated gallbladder cancer had the PL pattern, which was readily identifiable and characteristic of early-stage cancer. The WT pattern presented difficulties for diagnosis, and the ML pattern was relatively specific, although most of these cases were at advanced stages. Approximately 40 % of ADM patients were found to be in advanced stages of gallbladder cancer, in spite of undergoing periodic follow up. Conclusions This study revealed the difficulty of early diagnosis of primary gallbladder cancer in the setting of concurrent ADM. Current results suggest the possible utility of preventive cholecystectomy for management of asymptomatic ADM patients.

  • actual status of clinical diagnosis in patients with primary gallbladder cancer associated with Adenomyomatosis
    Indian Journal of Gastroenterology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Hiroyuki Irie, Masanori Masuda, Kenji Kitahara, Atsushi Miyoshi, Kohji Miyazaki, Hirokazu Noshiro, Osamu Tokunaga

    Abstract:

    Aim
    The purpose of this study was to reveal differences in clinical diagnosis of gallbladder cancer among patients with or without Adenomyomatosis (ADM) by analyzing demonstrated tumor patterns on imaging and diagnostic opportunities.

  • Clinicopathologic features of advanced gallbladder cancer associated with Adenomyomatosis
    Virchows Archiv, 2011
    Co-Authors: Masanori Masuda, Kenji Kitahara, Atsushi Miyoshi, Kohji Miyazaki, Hirokazu Noshiro, Osamu Tokunaga

    Abstract:

    Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder has not been considered to have malignant potential, but gross features of Adenomyomatosis are sometimes encountered in gallbladders resected under a diagnosis of gallbladder carcinoma. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinicopathologic features and survival rates in cases of gallbladder cancer with gross features of Adenomyomatosis. The study subjects were 97 surgically treated gallbladder carcinoma patients. Only gallbladder showing typical gross features of Adenomyomatosis was judged as Adenomyomatosis-positive gallbladder cancer. In terms of gross findings, 25 cases (25.8%) were classified as Adenomyomatosis-positive. The status of Adenomyomatosis was significantly associated with the T stage ( P  = 0.0004), lymph node (LN) metastasis ( P  

Katsuyoshi Hatakeyama – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • High risk of gallbladder carcinoma in elderly patients with segmental Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder.
    Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research, 2004
    Co-Authors: N Nabatame, Atsushi Nishimura, Yoshio Shirai, Naoyuki Yokoyama, Wakai T, Katsuyoshi Hatakeyama

    Abstract:

    The clinical significance of Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder remains unclear. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between segmental Adenomyomatosis and gallbladder carcinoma, and to elucidate the histogenesis of gallbladder carcinoma associated with segmental Adenomyomatosis. A total of 4,560 consecutive patients underwent cholecystectomy. The specimens were examined grossly and histologically. Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder was divided into segmental, fundal, and diffuse types. Sixty noncancerous gallbladders with segmental Adenomyomatosis were examined for epithelial metaplasia. The incidence of gallbladder carcinoma was higher in patients with segmental Adenomyomatosis (22/334, 6.6%) than in those without (181/4226, 4.3%; P=0.049). This difference was more marked among patients equal to or older than 60 years of age (15/96,15.6% versus 147/2407, 6.1%, respectively; P

  • high risk of gallbladder carcinoma in elderly patients with segmental Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder
    Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research, 2004
    Co-Authors: N Nabatame, Atsushi Nishimura, Yoshio Shirai, Naoyuki Yokoyama, T Wakai, Katsuyoshi Hatakeyama

    Abstract:

    : The clinical significance of Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder remains unclear. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between segmental Adenomyomatosis and gallbladder carcinoma, and to elucidate the histogenesis of gallbladder carcinoma associated with segmental Adenomyomatosis. A total of 4,560 consecutive patients underwent cholecystectomy. The specimens were examined grossly and histologically. Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder was divided into segmental, fundal, and diffuse types. Sixty noncancerous gallbladders with segmental Adenomyomatosis were examined for epithelial metaplasia. The incidence of gallbladder carcinoma was higher in patients with segmental Adenomyomatosis (22/334, 6.6%) than in those without (181/4226, 4.3%; P=0.049). This difference was more marked among patients equal to or older than 60 years of age (15/96,15.6% versus 147/2407, 6.1%, respectively; P<0.001). The other types of Adenomyomatosis did not show any significant increases in the incidence of gallbladder carcinoma. In all 22 patients with both segmental Adenomyomatosis and carcinoma, the tumors developed only in the fundal mucosa. Epithelial metaplasia was more marked in the fundal mucosa of segmental Adenomyomatosis than in the neck mucosa (P=0.003). Segmental Adenomyomatosis is a high-risk condition for gallbladder carcinoma, especially in elderly patients. Epithelial metaplasia appears to be related to increased carcinogenesis in the fundal mucosa of segmental Adenomyomatosis.

  • Segmental Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder predisposes to cholecystolithiasis
    Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery, 2004
    Co-Authors: Atsushi Nishimura, Yoshio Shirai, Katsuyoshi Hatakeyama

    Abstract:

    Background/Purpose The aim of the present study was to clarify the association between Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder and cholecystolithiasis. Methods A cholecystectomy was performed for cholelithiasis or various other conditions in 1099 patients, of whom 608 had cholecystolithiasis. Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder was classified as one of three variants: segmental, fundal, and diffuse. Segmental Adenomyomatosis has an annular stricture dividing the gallbladder lumen into the “neck compartment” and the “fundal compartment”. Bile lipid analysis was performed in 8 patients with segmental Adenomyomatosis. Results Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder was observed in 156 patients (14.2%), of whom 99 had segmental Adenomyomatosis, 54 had fundal Adenomyomatosis, and 3 had diffuse Adenomyomatosis. The prevalence of cholecystolithiasis was higher in patients with segmental Adenomyomatosis (88.9%) than in those without Adenomyomatosis (52.3%; P < 0.001). Gallstones were detected earlier in patients with segmental Adenomyomatosis than in those without ( P < 0.001) and were located predominantly in the fundal compartment. Bile in the fundal compartment had lower concentrations of total bile acids ( P = 0.012), with an increased cholesterol saturation index ( P = 0.012), compared to bile in the neck compartment. Conclusions Segmental Adenomyomatosis is a condition predisposing to cholecystolithiasis, probably due to the lithogenic environment in the fundal compartment. Fundal or diffuse Adenomyomatosis appears to be unrelated to cholecystolithiasis.

Atsushi Nishimura – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • High risk of gallbladder carcinoma in elderly patients with segmental Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder.
    Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research, 2004
    Co-Authors: N Nabatame, Atsushi Nishimura, Yoshio Shirai, Naoyuki Yokoyama, Wakai T, Katsuyoshi Hatakeyama

    Abstract:

    The clinical significance of Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder remains unclear. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between segmental Adenomyomatosis and gallbladder carcinoma, and to elucidate the histogenesis of gallbladder carcinoma associated with segmental Adenomyomatosis. A total of 4,560 consecutive patients underwent cholecystectomy. The specimens were examined grossly and histologically. Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder was divided into segmental, fundal, and diffuse types. Sixty noncancerous gallbladders with segmental Adenomyomatosis were examined for epithelial metaplasia. The incidence of gallbladder carcinoma was higher in patients with segmental Adenomyomatosis (22/334, 6.6%) than in those without (181/4226, 4.3%; P=0.049). This difference was more marked among patients equal to or older than 60 years of age (15/96,15.6% versus 147/2407, 6.1%, respectively; P

  • high risk of gallbladder carcinoma in elderly patients with segmental Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder
    Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research, 2004
    Co-Authors: N Nabatame, Atsushi Nishimura, Yoshio Shirai, Naoyuki Yokoyama, T Wakai, Katsuyoshi Hatakeyama

    Abstract:

    : The clinical significance of Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder remains unclear. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between segmental Adenomyomatosis and gallbladder carcinoma, and to elucidate the histogenesis of gallbladder carcinoma associated with segmental Adenomyomatosis. A total of 4,560 consecutive patients underwent cholecystectomy. The specimens were examined grossly and histologically. Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder was divided into segmental, fundal, and diffuse types. Sixty noncancerous gallbladders with segmental Adenomyomatosis were examined for epithelial metaplasia. The incidence of gallbladder carcinoma was higher in patients with segmental Adenomyomatosis (22/334, 6.6%) than in those without (181/4226, 4.3%; P=0.049). This difference was more marked among patients equal to or older than 60 years of age (15/96,15.6% versus 147/2407, 6.1%, respectively; P<0.001). The other types of Adenomyomatosis did not show any significant increases in the incidence of gallbladder carcinoma. In all 22 patients with both segmental Adenomyomatosis and carcinoma, the tumors developed only in the fundal mucosa. Epithelial metaplasia was more marked in the fundal mucosa of segmental Adenomyomatosis than in the neck mucosa (P=0.003). Segmental Adenomyomatosis is a high-risk condition for gallbladder carcinoma, especially in elderly patients. Epithelial metaplasia appears to be related to increased carcinogenesis in the fundal mucosa of segmental Adenomyomatosis.

  • Segmental Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder predisposes to cholecystolithiasis
    Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery, 2004
    Co-Authors: Atsushi Nishimura, Yoshio Shirai, Katsuyoshi Hatakeyama

    Abstract:

    Background/Purpose The aim of the present study was to clarify the association between Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder and cholecystolithiasis. Methods A cholecystectomy was performed for cholelithiasis or various other conditions in 1099 patients, of whom 608 had cholecystolithiasis. Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder was classified as one of three variants: segmental, fundal, and diffuse. Segmental Adenomyomatosis has an annular stricture dividing the gallbladder lumen into the “neck compartment” and the “fundal compartment”. Bile lipid analysis was performed in 8 patients with segmental Adenomyomatosis. Results Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder was observed in 156 patients (14.2%), of whom 99 had segmental Adenomyomatosis, 54 had fundal Adenomyomatosis, and 3 had diffuse Adenomyomatosis. The prevalence of cholecystolithiasis was higher in patients with segmental Adenomyomatosis (88.9%) than in those without Adenomyomatosis (52.3%; P < 0.001). Gallstones were detected earlier in patients with segmental Adenomyomatosis than in those without ( P < 0.001) and were located predominantly in the fundal compartment. Bile in the fundal compartment had lower concentrations of total bile acids ( P = 0.012), with an increased cholesterol saturation index ( P = 0.012), compared to bile in the neck compartment. Conclusions Segmental Adenomyomatosis is a condition predisposing to cholecystolithiasis, probably due to the lithogenic environment in the fundal compartment. Fundal or diffuse Adenomyomatosis appears to be unrelated to cholecystolithiasis.