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Adenosquamous Carcinoma

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Jason A. Zell – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • population based evaluation of Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the colon and rectum
    Diseases of The Colon & Rectum, 2012
    Co-Authors: Hossein Masoomi, Argyrios Ziogas, Bruce S. Lin, Andrew Barleben, Steven Mills, Michael J. Stamos, Jason A. Zell
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND:Information about Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the colon and rectum is scarce because of its extremely low incidence.OBJECTIVE:The aim of this study was to examine the prognostic significance of a histological diagnosis of Adenosquamous Carcinoma in comparison with adenoCarcinoma of the col

  • Population-based evaluation of Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the colon and rectum.
    Diseases of the colon and rectum, 2012
    Co-Authors: Hossein Masoomi, Argyrios Ziogas, Bruce S. Lin, Andrew Barleben, Steven Mills, Michael J. Stamos, Jason A. Zell
    Abstract:

    Information about Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the colon and rectum is scarce because of its extremely low incidence. The aim of this study was to examine the prognostic significance of a histological diagnosis of Adenosquamous Carcinoma in comparison with adenoCarcinoma of the colon and rectum. This study was retrospective in design. California Cancer Registry data from 1994 through 2004 with follow-up through 2008 were analyzed. Patients were included whose cancer of the colon and rectum, excluding the anus with a tumor histhistology of adenoCarcinoma and Adenosquamous Carcinoma, was surgically treated. The primary outcomes measured were histology-specific survival analyses (with the use of the Kaplan-Meier method), and overall and colorectal-specific mortality (with the use of multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses). A total of 111,263 adenoCarcinoma and Adenosquamous Carcinoma of colon and rectal cancer cases were identified (adenoCarcinoma, 99.91%; Adenosquamous Carcinoma, 0.09%). There was no significant difference in sex, age, race, and socioeconomic status between the 2 groups. The most common location of adenoCarcinoma and Adenosquamous Carcinoma was the right and transverse colon. The Adenosquamous Carcinoma group was significantly associated with a higher rate of metastasis at the time of operation (Adenosquamous Carcinoma, 36.56% vs adenoCarcinoma, 13.92%) and with poorly differentiated tumor grade (Adenosquamous Carcinoma, 65.96% vs adenoCarcinoma, 19.74%) in comparison with the adenoCarcinoma group. The median overall survival time was significantly greater in the adenoCarcinoma group (82.4 months) in comparison with the Adenosquamous Carcinoma group (35.3 months). With the use of multivariable hazard regression analyses, Adenosquamous Carcinoma histology was independently associated with increased overall mortality (hazard ratio, 1.67) and colorectal-specific mortality (hazard ratio, 1.69) in comparison with adenoCarcinoma. This is one of the largest studies of Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the colon and rectum to date. This uncommon colorectal cancer subtype was associated with higher overall and colorectal-specific mortality in comparison with adenoCarcinoma. Among colorectal cancer cases, Adenosquamous Carcinoma histology should be considered a poor prognostic feature.

Hossein Masoomi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • population based evaluation of Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the colon and rectum
    Diseases of The Colon & Rectum, 2012
    Co-Authors: Hossein Masoomi, Argyrios Ziogas, Bruce S. Lin, Andrew Barleben, Steven Mills, Michael J. Stamos, Jason A. Zell
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND:Information about Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the colon and rectum is scarce because of its extremely low incidence.OBJECTIVE:The aim of this study was to examine the prognostic significance of a histological diagnosis of Adenosquamous Carcinoma in comparison with adenoCarcinoma of the col

  • Population-based evaluation of Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the colon and rectum.
    Diseases of the colon and rectum, 2012
    Co-Authors: Hossein Masoomi, Argyrios Ziogas, Bruce S. Lin, Andrew Barleben, Steven Mills, Michael J. Stamos, Jason A. Zell
    Abstract:

    Information about Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the colon and rectum is scarce because of its extremely low incidence. The aim of this study was to examine the prognostic significance of a histological diagnosis of Adenosquamous Carcinoma in comparison with adenoCarcinoma of the colon and rectum. This study was retrospective in design. California Cancer Registry data from 1994 through 2004 with follow-up through 2008 were analyzed. Patients were included whose cancer of the colon and rectum, excluding the anus with a tumor histology of adenoCarcinoma and Adenosquamous Carcinoma, was surgically treated. The primary outcomes measured were histology-specific survival analyses (with the use of the Kaplan-Meier method), and overall and colorectal-specific mortality (with the use of multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses). A total of 111,263 adenoCarcinoma and Adenosquamous Carcinoma of colon and rectal cancer cases were identified (adenoCarcinoma, 99.91%; Adenosquamous Carcinoma, 0.09%). There was no significant difference in sex, age, race, and socioeconomic status between the 2 groups. The most common location of adenoCarcinoma and Adenosquamous Carcinoma was the right and transverse colon. The Adenosquamous Carcinoma group was significantly associated with a higher rate of metastasis at the time of operation (Adenosquamous Carcinoma, 36.56% vs adenoCarcinoma, 13.92%) and with poorly differentiated tumor grade (Adenosquamous Carcinoma, 65.96% vs adenoCarcinoma, 19.74%) in comparison with the adenoCarcinoma group. The median overall survival time was significantly greater in the adenoCarcinoma group (82.4 months) in comparison with the Adenosquamous Carcinoma group (35.3 months). With the use of multivariable hazard regression analyses, Adenosquamous Carcinoma histology was independently associated with increased overall mortality (hazard ratio, 1.67) and colorectal-specific mortality (hazard ratio, 1.69) in comparison with adenoCarcinoma. This is one of the largest studies of Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the colon and rectum to date. This uncommon colorectal cancer subtype was associated with higher overall and colorectal-specific mortality in comparison with adenoCarcinoma. Among colorectal cancer cases, Adenosquamous Carcinoma histology should be considered a poor prognostic feature.

Stephan C. Schäfer – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Molecular profiling of lung Adenosquamous Carcinoma: hybrid or genuine type?
    Oncotarget, 2015
    Co-Authors: Erik Vassella, Stephanie Langsch, Matthias S. Dettmer, Cornelia Schlup, Maja Neuenschwander, Milo Frattini, Mathias Gugger, Stephan C. Schäfer
    Abstract:

    Lung Adenosquamous Carcinoma is a particular subtype of non-small cell lung Carcinoma that is defined by the coexistence of adenoCarcinoma and squamous cell Carcinoma components. The aim of this study was to assess the mutational profile in each component of 16 Adenosquamous Carcinoma samples from a Caucasian population by a combination of next generation sequencing using the cancer hotspot panel as well as the colon and lung cancer panel and FISH. Identified mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing of DNA from cancer cells of each component collected by Laser Capture microdissection. Mutations typical for adenoCarcinoma as well as squamous cell Carcinoma were identified. Driver mutations were predominantly in the trunk suggesting a monoclonal origin of Adenosquamous Carcinoma. Most remarkably, EGFR mutations and mutations in the PI3K signaling pathway, which accounted for 30% and 25% of tumors respectively, were more prevalent while KRAS mutations were less prevalent than expected for a Caucasian population. Surprisingly, expression of classifier miR-205 was intermediate between that of classical adenoCarcinoma and squamous cell Carcinoma suggesting that Adenosquamous Carcinoma is a transitional stage between these tumor types. The high prevalence of therapy-relevant targets opens new options of therapeutic intervention for Adenosquamous Carcinoma patients.

Taylor S. Riall – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • 415 patients with Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the pancreas: a population-based analysis of prognosis and survival.
    The Journal of surgical research, 2011
    Co-Authors: Casey A. Boyd, Jaime Benarroch-gampel, Kristin M. Sheffield, Catherine D. Cooksley, Taylor S. Riall
    Abstract:

    Background Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the pancreas is rare. Our understanding of the disease and its prognosis comes mainly from small retrospective studies. Methods Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database (1988 to 2007), we identified patients with Adenosquamous Carcinoma (n = 415) or adenoCarcinoma (n = 45,693) of the pancreas. The demographics, tumor characteristics, resection status, and survival were compared between the groups. Results Compared with patients with adenoCarcinoma, patients with Adenosquamous Carcinoma were more likely to have disease located in the pancreatic body and tail (44.6% versus 53.5%, P Conclusions This is the first population-based study to evaluate outcomes in Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the pancreas. Compared with pancreatic adenoCarcinoma, Adenosquamous Carcinoma was more likely to occur in the pancreatic tail, be poorly differentiated, larger, and node positive. The long-term survival following surgical resection is significantly worse for Adenosquamous cancers; however, patients with Adenosquamous Carcinoma can still benefit from surgical resection, which is the strongest predictor of survival.

Michael J. Stamos – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • population based evaluation of Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the colon and rectum
    Diseases of The Colon & Rectum, 2012
    Co-Authors: Hossein Masoomi, Argyrios Ziogas, Bruce S. Lin, Andrew Barleben, Steven Mills, Michael J. Stamos, Jason A. Zell
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND:Information about Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the colon and rectum is scarce because of its extremely low incidence.OBJECTIVE:The aim of this study was to examine the prognostic significance of a histological diagnosis of Adenosquamous Carcinoma in comparison with adenoCarcinoma of the col

  • Population-based evaluation of Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the colon and rectum.
    Diseases of the colon and rectum, 2012
    Co-Authors: Hossein Masoomi, Argyrios Ziogas, Bruce S. Lin, Andrew Barleben, Steven Mills, Michael J. Stamos, Jason A. Zell
    Abstract:

    Information about Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the colon and rectum is scarce because of its extremely low incidence. The aim of this study was to examine the prognostic significance of a histological diagnosis of Adenosquamous Carcinoma in comparison with adenoCarcinoma of the colon and rectum. This study was retrospective in design. California Cancer Registry data from 1994 through 2004 with follow-up through 2008 were analyzed. Patients were included whose cancer of the colon and rectum, excluding the anus with a tumor histology of adenoCarcinoma and Adenosquamous Carcinoma, was surgically treated. The primary outcomes measured were histology-specific survival analyses (with the use of the Kaplan-Meier method), and overall and colorectal-specific mortality (with the use of multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses). A total of 111,263 adenoCarcinoma and Adenosquamous Carcinoma of colon and rectal cancer cases were identified (adenoCarcinoma, 99.91%; Adenosquamous Carcinoma, 0.09%). There was no significant difference in sex, age, race, and socioeconomic status between the 2 groups. The most common location of adenoCarcinoma and Adenosquamous Carcinoma was the right and transverse colon. The Adenosquamous Carcinoma group was significantly associated with a higher rate of metastasis at the time of operation (Adenosquamous Carcinoma, 36.56% vs adenoCarcinoma, 13.92%) and with poorly differentiated tumor grade (Adenosquamous Carcinoma, 65.96% vs adenoCarcinoma, 19.74%) in comparison with the adenoCarcinoma group. The median overall survival time was significantly greater in the adenoCarcinoma group (82.4 months) in comparison with the Adenosquamous Carcinoma group (35.3 months). With the use of multivariable hazard regression analyses, Adenosquamous Carcinoma histology was independently associated with increased overall mortality (hazard ratio, 1.67) and colorectal-specific mortality (hazard ratio, 1.69) in comparison with adenoCarcinoma. This is one of the largest studies of Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the colon and rectum to date. This uncommon colorectal cancer subtype was associated with higher overall and colorectal-specific mortality in comparison with adenoCarcinoma. Among colorectal cancer cases, Adenosquamous Carcinoma histology should be considered a poor prognostic feature.