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Adenoviridae

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Henrique Ortêncio Filho – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Detection of adenovirus, papillomavirus and parvovirus in Brazilian bats of the species Artibeus lituratus and Sturnira lilium
    Archives of Virology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Fernando…[et Al.] Finoketti, Raíssa Nunes Santos, Aline Alves Scarpellini Campos, André Luís Da Silva Zani, Camila Mosca Barboza, Marcélia Emanuele Sad Fernandes, Tatiane De Cassia Pardo Souza, Driele Delanira Santos, Giovana Werneck Bortolanza, Henrique Ortêncio Filho
    Abstract:

    Bats play a significant role in maintaining their ecosystems through pollination, dispersal of seeds, and control of insect populations, but they are also known to host many microorganisms and have been described as natural reservoirs for viruses with zoonotic potential. The diversity of viruses in these animals remains largely unknown, however, because studies are limited by species, location, virus target, or sample type. Therefore, the aim of this study was to detect fragments of viral genomes in bat samples. We performed high-throughput sequencing analysis and specific PCR and RT-PCR on pools of anal and oropharyngeal swabs from Artibeus lituratus and Sturnira lilium collected in southern Brazil. As a result, a member of the family Adenoviridae related to human adenovirus C was detected in anal swabs from S. lilium . In addition, we detected a papillomavirus in an anal swab from A. lituratus . Our analyses also allowed the detection of adenoviruses and parvoviruses in oropharyngeal swabs collected from A. lituratus . These results increase our knowledge about viral diversity and illustrate the importance of conducting virus surveillance in bats.

Fernando…[et Al.] Finoketti – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Detection of adenovirus, papillomavirus and parvovirus in Brazilian bats of the species Artibeus lituratus and Sturnira lilium
    Archives of Virology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Fernando…[et Al.] Finoketti, Raíssa Nunes Santos, Aline Alves Scarpellini Campos, André Luís Da Silva Zani, Camila Mosca Barboza, Marcélia Emanuele Sad Fernandes, Tatiane De Cassia Pardo Souza, Driele Delanira Santos, Giovana Werneck Bortolanza, Henrique Ortêncio Filho
    Abstract:

    Bats play a significant role in maintaining their ecosystems through pollination, dispersal of seeds, and control of insect populations, but they are also known to host many microorganisms and have been described as natural reservoirs for viruses with zoonotic potential. The diversity of viruses in these animals remains largely unknown, however, because studies are limited by species, location, virus target, or sample type. Therefore, the aim of this study was to detect fragments of viral genomes in bat samples. We performed high-throughput sequencing analysis and specific PCR and RT-PCR on pools of anal and oropharyngeal swabs from Artibeus lituratus and Sturnira lilium collected in southern Brazil. As a result, a member of the family Adenoviridae related to human adenovirus C was detected in anal swabs from S. lilium . In addition, we detected a papillomavirus in an anal swab from A. lituratus . Our analyses also allowed the detection of adenoviruses and parvoviruses in oropharyngeal swabs collected from A. lituratus . These results increase our knowledge about viral diversity and illustrate the importance of conducting virus surveillance in bats.

  • Detection of adenovirus, papillomavirus and parvovirus in Brazilianbats of the species Artibeus lituratus and Sturnira lilium
    Springer, 2019
    Co-Authors: Fernando…[et Al.] Finoketti
    Abstract:

    AbstractBats play a significant role in maintaining their ecosystems through pollination, dispersal of seeds, and control of insectpopulations, but they are also known to host many microorganisms and have been described as natural reservoirs for viruseswith zoonotic potential. The diversity of viruses in these animals remains largely unknown, however, because studies arelimited by species, location, virus target, or sample type. Therefore, the aim of this study was to detect fragments of viralgenomes in bat samples. We performed high-throughput sequencing analysis and specific PCR and RT-PCR on pools of analand oropharyngeal swabs from Artibeus lituratus and Sturnira lilium collected in southern Brazil. As a result, a member ofthe family Adenoviridae related to human adenovirus C was detected in anal swabs from S. lilium. In addition, we detected apapillomavirus in an anal swab from A. lituratus. Our analyses also allowed the detection of adenoviruses and parvovirusesin oropharyngeal swabs collected from A. lituratus. These results increase our knowledge about viral diversity and illustratethe importance of conducting virus surveillance in bats

David T Curiel – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • thermostability infectivity defect caused by deletion of the core protein v gene in human adenovirus type 5 is rescued by thermo selectable mutations in the core protein x precursor
    Journal of Molecular Biology, 2007
    Co-Authors: Hideyo Ugai, Anton V Borovjagin, Long P Le, Minghui Wang, David T Curiel
    Abstract:

    Abstract Mastadenoviruses represent one of the four major genera of the Adenoviridae family comprising a variety of mammalian pathogens including human adenovirus (Ad), whose genomes encode a gene for minor core protprotein V (pV), not found in other genera of Adenoviridae. Deletion of other genus-specific genes (gene IX and E3 genes) from the Ad type 5 (Ad5) genome has been studied experimentally in vitro and the results on biological characterization of the mutants support the phylogenetic evidence of those genes being non-essential for Ad viability. On this basis it seemed logical to suggest that a deletion of gene V from the Ad5 genome could also be tolerated. To test this hypothesis we constructed and rescued the first pV-deletion mutant of human Ad5. As compared to Ad5, this mutant formed small plaques, had dramatically reduced thermostability and lower infectivity. A subsequent thermoselection screen of the pV-deleted Ad5 allowed isolation of a suppressor mutant Ad5-dV/TSB with restored biological characteristics. Since replication and viral assembly of Ad5-dV/TSB could still occur in the absence of pV, we conclude that pV is a non-essential component of the virion. The observed rescue of the biological defects appears to be associated with a cluster of point mutations in the gene encoding the precursor for the other core protprotein, X/Mu. This finding, thus, suggests possible roles of pV and protein X/Mu precursor in viral assembly. It also provides an interesting insight into genetic events that mediate molecular adaptation of viruses to possible changes in the genetic background in the course of their evolutionary divergence. The possible mechanism of the observed genetic suppression is discussed.

  • Thermostability/Infectivity Defect Caused by Deletion of the Core Protein V Gene in Human Adenovirus Type 5 Is Rescued by Thermo-selectable Mutations in the Core Protein X Precursor
    Journal of molecular biology, 2006
    Co-Authors: Hideyo Ugai, Anton V Borovjagin, Minghui Wang, David T Curiel
    Abstract:

    Mastadenoviruses represent one of the four major genera of the Adenoviridae family comprising a variety of mammalian pathogens including human adenovirus (Ad), whose genomes encode a gene for minor core protprotein V (pV), not found in other genera of Adenoviridae. Deletion of other genus-specific genes (gene IX and E3 genes) from the Ad type 5 (Ad5) genome has been studied experimentally in vitro and the results on biological characterization of the mutants support the phylogenetic evidence of those genes being non-essential for Ad viability. On this basis it seemed logical to suggest that a deletion of gene V from the Ad5 genome could also be tolerated. To test this hypothesis we constructed and rescued the first pV-deletion mutant of human Ad5. As compared to Ad5, this mutant formed small plaques, had dramatically reduced thermostability and lower infectivity. A subsequent thermoselection screen of the pV-deleted Ad5 allowed isolation of a suppressor mutant Ad5-dV/TSB with restored biological characteristics. Since replication and viral assembly of Ad5-dV/TSB could still occur in the absence of pV, we conclude that pV is a non-essential component of the virion. The observed rescue of the biological defects appears to be associated with a cluster of point mutations in the gene encoding the precursor for the other core protprotein, X/Mu. This finding, thus, suggests possible roles of pV and protein X/Mu precursor in viral assembly. It also provides an interesting insight into genetic events that mediate molecular adaptation of viruses to possible changes in the genetic background in the course of their evolutionary divergence. The possible mechanism of the observed genetic suppression is discussed.

Guy Boivin – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Treatment of respiratory virus infections.
    Antiviral Research, 2006
    Co-Authors: Yacine Abed, Guy Boivin
    Abstract:

    Respiratory viral infections (RVIs) can be associated with a wide range of clinical manifestations ranging from self-limited upper resprespiratory tract infections to more devastating conditions, such as pneumonia. RVIs constitute the most frequent reason for medical consultations in the world and they have a considerable impact on quality of life and productivity. Therefore, the prevention and control of RVIs remain major clinical goals. Currently, there are approximately 200 known respiratory viruses that can be grouped into one family of DNA viruses (Adenoviridae) and four families of RNA viruses (Orthomyxoviridae, Paramyxoviridae, Picornaviridae and Coronaviridae). In this paper, we review the major respiratory viruses that cause disesases in humans, with an emphasis on current treatment options.

Aline Alves Scarpellini Campos – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Detection of adenovirus, papillomavirus and parvovirus in Brazilian bats of the species Artibeus lituratus and Sturnira lilium
    Archives of Virology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Fernando…[et Al.] Finoketti, Raíssa Nunes Santos, Aline Alves Scarpellini Campos, André Luís Da Silva Zani, Camila Mosca Barboza, Marcélia Emanuele Sad Fernandes, Tatiane De Cassia Pardo Souza, Driele Delanira Santos, Giovana Werneck Bortolanza, Henrique Ortêncio Filho
    Abstract:

    Bats play a significant role in maintaining their ecosystems through pollination, dispersal of seeds, and control of insect populations, but they are also known to host many microorganisms and have been described as natural reservoirs for viruses with zoonotic potential. The diversity of viruses in these animals remains largely unknown, however, because studies are limited by species, location, virus target, or sample type. Therefore, the aim of this study was to detect fragments of viral genomes in bat samples. We performed high-throughput sequencing analysis and specific PCR and RT-PCR on pools of anal and oropharyngeal swabs from Artibeus lituratus and Sturnira lilium collected in southern Brazil. As a result, a member of the family Adenoviridae related to human adenovirus C was detected in anal swabs from S. lilium . In addition, we detected a papillomavirus in an anal swab from A. lituratus . Our analyses also allowed the detection of adenoviruses and parvoviruses in oropharyngeal swabs collected from A. lituratus . These results increase our knowledge about viral diversity and illustrate the importance of conducting virus surveillance in bats.