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Michael N Dudley – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • microbiologic and pharmacodynamic principals applied to the antimicrobial susceptibility testing of ampicillin sulbactam analysis of the correlations between in vitro test results and clinical response
    Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease, 1997
    Co-Authors: Ronald N Jones, Michael N Dudley
    Abstract:

    Abstract The correlation between various ampicillin/sulbactam in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility test results and the clinical outcome of patients treated with this agent have been examined. A survey of over 29,000 clinical isolates of the family Enterobacteriaceae found that the proportion of susceptible pathogens as assessed by current susceptibility testing interpretive guidelines (NCCLS) for disk diffusion and dilution (MIC) assays was significantly less than the proportion of patients cured or clinically improved in apicillin/sulbactam clinical trials. Also, the results of two NCCLS methods differ greatly in the perceived percentages of susceptible strains (63.9% versus 72.2%; unacceptable variation). Furthermore, the current interpretive criteria resulted in high false-susceptible (4.2%) and total (19.7%) error rates. When proposed interpretive guidelines were applied, approximately 73 to 87% of the Enterobacteriaceae strains were observed to be susceptible, the variation between methods was minimized, and the error rates were reduced. A retrospective analysis of data from clinical trials with ampicillin/sulbactam indicated that the proportion of patients who were cured or clinically improved and bacterially eradi cated was not appreciably different in patients having baseline Enterobacteriaceae pathogens with MICs of 16 or 32 μg/ml (ampicillin MIC component) as compared to those with pathogens having MICs of ⩽8 μg/ml. Studies in animals, in vitro models, and pharmacokinetic considerations indicate that a change in the MIC breakpoint for ampicillin/sulbactam should be considered. The proposed interpretive guideline revisions for ampicillin/sulbactam susceptibility testing of the Enterobacteriaceae were 1) use current diagnostic reagents with criteria of ⩽168 μg/ml (⩾14 mm) as susceptible and ⩾642 μg/ml (⩽10 mm) as resistant; e.g., 75.9 to 76.0% spectrum and 1.3% false-susceptible error; 2) use alternative diagnostic reagents (1:1 ratio MIC; 2020 μg disks) with criteria of ⩽88 μg/ml (⩾18 mm) as susceptible and ⩾3232 μg/ml (⩽14 mm) as resistant; e.g., 73.3 to 76.9% spectrum and 1.8% false-susceptible error; or 3) use alternative diagnostic reagents with criteria of ⩽1616 μg/ml (⩾14 mm) as susceptible and ⩾6464 μg/ml (⩽10 mm) as resistant; e.g., 84.7 to 86.9% spectrum and 1.3% false-susceptible error. Data from a comprehensive in vitro survey of clinical isolates, retrospective analyses of clinical trials, and studies of animal models support the modification of contemporary interpretive guidelines for ampicillin/sulbactam antimicrobial susceptibility tests. The best short-term criteria would apply current in vitro diagnostic reagents and a modified susceptible breakpoint (⩽168 μg/ml as susceptible; option 1 above) until new diagnostic reagents can be qualified by means of studies needed for quality assurance of standardized methods (NCCLS M23-A and FDA procedures). These changes would provide a better in vitro prediction of ampicillin/sulbactam efficacy in clinical practice.

Ronald N Jones – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • microbiologic and pharmacodynamic principals applied to the antimicrobial susceptibility testing of ampicillin sulbactam analysis of the correlations between in vitro test results and clinical response
    Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease, 1997
    Co-Authors: Ronald N Jones, Michael N Dudley
    Abstract:

    Abstract The correlation between various ampicillin/sulbactam in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility test results and the clinical outcome of patients treated with this agent have been examined. A survey of over 29,000 clinical isolates of the family Enterobacteriaceae found that the proportion of susceptible pathogens as assessed by current susceptibility testing interpretive guidelines (NCCLS) for disk diffusion and dilution (MIC) assays was significantly less than the proportion of patients cured or clinically improved in apicillin/sulbactam clinical trials. Also, the results of two NCCLS methods differ greatly in the perceived percentages of susceptible strains (63.9% versus 72.2%; unacceptable variation). Furthermore, the current interpretive criteria resulted in high false-susceptible (4.2%) and total (19.7%) error rates. When proposed interpretive guidelines were applied, approximately 73 to 87% of the Enterobacteriaceae strains were observed to be susceptible, the variation between methods was minimized, and the error rates were reduced. A retrospective analysis of data from clinical trials with ampicillin/sulbactam indicated that the proportion of patients who were cured or clinically improved and bacterially eradi cated was not appreciably different in patients having baseline Enterobacteriaceae pathogens with MICs of 16 or 32 μg/ml (ampicillin MIC component) as compared to those with pathogens having MICs of ⩽8 μg/ml. Studies in animals, in vitro models, and pharmacokinetic considerations indicate that a change in the MIC breakpoint for ampicillin/sulbactam should be considered. The proposed interpretive guideline revisions for ampicillin/sulbactam susceptibility testing of the Enterobacteriaceae were 1) use current diagnostic reagents with criteria of ⩽168 μg/ml (⩾14 mm) as susceptible and ⩾642 μg/ml (⩽10 mm) as resistant; e.g., 75.9 to 76.0% spectrum and 1.3% false-susceptible error; 2) use alternative diagnostic reagents (1:1 ratio MIC; 2020 μg disks) with criteria of ⩽88 μg/ml (⩾18 mm) as susceptible and ⩾3232 μg/ml (⩽14 mm) as resistant; e.g., 73.3 to 76.9% spectrum and 1.8% false-susceptible error; or 3) use alternative diagnostic reagents with criteria of ⩽1616 μg/ml (⩾14 mm) as susceptible and ⩾6464 μg/ml (⩽10 mm) as resistant; e.g., 84.7 to 86.9% spectrum and 1.3% false-susceptible error. Data from a comprehensive in vitro survey of clinical isolates, retrospective analyses of clinical trials, and studies of animal models support the modification of contemporary interpretive guidelines for ampicillin/sulbactam antimicrobial susceptibility tests. The best short-term criteria would apply current in vitro diagnostic reagents and a modified susceptible breakpoint (⩽168 μg/ml as susceptible; option 1 above) until new diagnostic reagents can be qualified by means of studies needed for quality assurance of standardized methods (NCCLS M23-A and FDA procedures). These changes would provide a better in vitro prediction of ampicillin/sulbactam efficacy in clinical practice.

M Y Sugun – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • multidrug resistant pasteurella multocida strains isolated from chickens with cases of fowl cholera in jos nigeria
    International Journal of Poultry Science, 2013
    Co-Authors: Y D Dashe, M A Raji, P A Abdu, B S Oladele, M Y Sugun
    Abstract:

    5 Abstract: Antibiotic resistance is often encountered despite multiple antibiotics being used for the treatment of fowl cholera in Jos. This study was conducted to determine the antibiotic resistant profile of Pasteurella multocida isolated from chickens in Jos. A total of 2000 samples consisting of bone marrow, heart, liver, lung and spleen (400 each) were collected from 400 clinically sick chickens between November, 2010 and October, 2011 for the isolation of P. multocida. Swab from each sample was cultured on 7% defibrinated sheep blood, MacConkey and casein sucrose yeast agar. Presumptive colonies of P. multocida were subjected to biochemical characterization. Isolates identified by biochemical tests were further subjected to Microbact GNB 24E test. Disk diffusion method was employed to test the sensitivity of all the twelve P. multocida isolates confirmed by biochemical and Microbact GNB 24E test. The twelve pure isolates of P. multocida were tested for their sensitivity against fifteen different antibiotics. Drug sensitivity test conducted on P. multocida isolates showed that some of the isolates were resistant to penicillin 11 (73%), microlides 9 (60%), sulfanomides 8 (53.3%), cephalosporins 3 (20%) and other new groups of antibiotics 4 (27%). High resistance of P. multocida was recorded for ampicillin (91.7%) followed by amoxicillin/c lavulanic acid (83.3%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (66.7%), erythromycin and anicillin (58.3%) each, while tylosin was (33.3%). This study revealed that there is an emergence of multidrug resistance in some P. multocida strains among chickens in Jos, Nigeria. It is therefore recommended that antibiotic sensitivity test should be incorporated on a routine bases as part of measure to control fowl cholera and minimize the emergence of P. multocida resistance.

B S Oladele – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • multidrug resistant pasteurella multocida strains isolated from chickens with cases of fowl cholera in jos nigeria
    International Journal of Poultry Science, 2013
    Co-Authors: Y D Dashe, M A Raji, P A Abdu, B S Oladele, M Y Sugun
    Abstract:

    5 Abstract: Antibiotic resistance is often encountered despite multiple antibiotics being used for the treatment of fowl cholera in Jos. This study was conducted to determine the antibiotic resistant profile of Pasteurella multocida isolated from chickens in Jos. A total of 2000 samples consisting of bone marrow, heart, liver, lung and spleen (400 each) were collected from 400 clinically sick chickens between November, 2010 and October, 2011 for the isolation of P. multocida. Swab from each sample was cultured on 7% defibrinated sheep blood, MacConkey and casein sucrose yeast agar. Presumptive colonies of P. multocida were subjected to biochemical characterization. Isolates identified by biochemical tests were further subjected to Microbact GNB 24E test. Disk diffusion method was employed to test the sensitivity of all the twelve P. multocida isolates confirmed by biochemical and Microbact GNB 24E test. The twelve pure isolates of P. multocida were tested for their sensitivity against fifteen different antibiotics. Drug sensitivity test conducted on P. multocida isolates showed that some of the isolates were resistant to penicillin 11 (73%), microlides 9 (60%), sulfanomides 8 (53.3%), cephalosporins 3 (20%) and other new groups of antibiotics 4 (27%). High resistance of P. multocida was recorded for ampicillin (91.7%) followed by amoxicillin/c lavulanic acid (83.3%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (66.7%), erythromycin and anicillin (58.3%) each, while tylosin was (33.3%). This study revealed that there is an emergence of multidrug resistance in some P. multocida strains among chickens in Jos, Nigeria. It is therefore recommended that antibiotic sensitivity test should be incorporated on a routine bases as part of measure to control fowl cholera and minimize the emergence of P. multocida resistance.

P A Abdu – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • multidrug resistant pasteurella multocida strains isolated from chickens with cases of fowl cholera in jos nigeria
    International Journal of Poultry Science, 2013
    Co-Authors: Y D Dashe, M A Raji, P A Abdu, B S Oladele, M Y Sugun
    Abstract:

    5 Abstract: Antibiotic resistance is often encountered despite multiple antibiotics being used for the treatment of fowl cholera in Jos. This study was conducted to determine the antibiotic resistant profile of Pasteurella multocida isolated from chickens in Jos. A total of 2000 samples consisting of bone marrow, heart, liver, lung and spleen (400 each) were collected from 400 clinically sick chickens between November, 2010 and October, 2011 for the isolation of P. multocida. Swab from each sample was cultured on 7% defibrinated sheep blood, MacConkey and casein sucrose yeast agar. Presumptive colonies of P. multocida were subjected to biochemical characterization. Isolates identified by biochemical tests were further subjected to Microbact GNB 24E test. Disk diffusion method was employed to test the sensitivity of all the twelve P. multocida isolates confirmed by biochemical and Microbact GNB 24E test. The twelve pure isolates of P. multocida were tested for their sensitivity against fifteen different antibiotics. Drug sensitivity test conducted on P. multocida isolates showed that some of the isolates were resistant to penicillin 11 (73%), microlides 9 (60%), sulfanomides 8 (53.3%), cephalosporins 3 (20%) and other new groups of antibiotics 4 (27%). High resistance of P. multocida was recorded for ampicillin (91.7%) followed by amoxicillin/c lavulanic acid (83.3%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (66.7%), erythromycin and anicillin (58.3%) each, while tylosin was (33.3%). This study revealed that there is an emergence of multidrug resistance in some P. multocida strains among chickens in Jos, Nigeria. It is therefore recommended that antibiotic sensitivity test should be incorporated on a routine bases as part of measure to control fowl cholera and minimize the emergence of P. multocida resistance.