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Dipok K. Bora – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Scaling relations of moment magnitude, local magnitude, and duration magnitude for earthquakes originated in northeast India
    Earthquake Science, 2016
    Co-Authors: Dipok K. Bora
    Abstract:

    In this study, we aim to improve the scaling between the moment magnitude ( M _W), local magnitude ( M _L), and the duration magnitude ( M _D) for 162 earthquakes in Shillong-Mikir plateau and its Adjoining Region of northeast India by extending the M _W estimates to lower magnitude earthquakes using spectral analysis of P-waves from vertical component seismograms. The M _W- M _L and M _W- M _D relationships are determined by linear regression analysis. It is found that, M _W values can be considered consistent with M _L and M _D, within 0.1 and 0.2 magnitude units respectively, in 90 % of the cases. The scaling relationships investigated comply well with similar relationships in other Regions in the world and in other seismogenic areas in the northeast India Region.

  • Estimation of Source Parameters of Local Earthquakes Originated in Shillong-Mikir Plateau and its Adjoining Region of Northeastern India
    Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 2013
    Co-Authors: Dipok K. Bora, Saurabh Baruah, Rajib Biswas, N. Gogoi
    Abstract:

    Abstract We estimate the source parameters (seismic moment, source radius, stress drop, and source displacement) and scaling laws for local earthquakes that occurred in the Shillong–Mikir plateau, Assam Valley, and Arunachal Himalaya in northeast India during 2001–2008. The source parameters were determined using the spectral analysis of P waves from the vertical component seismograms, after correction for attenuation. Seismic moments are observed within the range from 9.51×10 12 to ; stress drop ranges from 4×10 5 to 9×10 7   Pa for the Brune model and 7×10 5 to 1×10 8   Pa for the Madariaga model. Seismic events in this study are prominent with an average stress drop of 0.1–10 MPa. The effect of site geology may be a contributing factor for such a variation in stress drop. Source dimensions are, however, found to be smaller within the major part of the plateau. It is suggested that local earthquakes in the Region are associated with a brittle shear‐failure mechanism on fault segments and/or the presence of weakened zones, and earthquakes are triggered by low deviatoric stress. Empirical relations between M w – M L and M 0 – M L are developed leading to the future prediction of calibration coefficients for the local earthquakes in the Shillong–Mikir plateau and its Adjoining Region. Online Material: Tables of source parameters.

  • mapping the crustal thickness in shillong mikir hills plateau and its Adjoining Region of northeastern india using moho reflected waves
    Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, 2012
    Co-Authors: Dipok K. Bora, Saurabh Baruah
    Abstract:

    Abstract In this study we have tried to detect and collect later phases associated with Moho discontinuity and used them to study the lateral variations of the crustal thickness in Shillong–Mikir Hills Plateau and its Adjoining Region of northeastern India. We use the inversion algorithm by Nakajima et al. (Nakajima, J., Matsuzawa, T., Hasegawa, A. 2002. Moho depth variation in the central part of northeastern Japan estimated from reflected and converted waves. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 130, 31–47), having epicentral distance ranging from 60 km to 150 km. Taking the advantage of high quality broadband data now available in northeast India, we have detected 1607 Moho reflected phases (PmP and SmS) from 300 numbers of shallow earthquake events (depth ⩽ 25 km) in Shillong–Mikir Hills Plateau and its Adjoining Region. Notably for PmP phase, this could be identified within 0.5–2.3 s after the first P-arrival. In case of SmS phase, the arrival times are observed within 1.0–4.2 s after the first S-arrival. We estimated the crustal thickness in the study area using travel time difference between the later phases (PmP and SmS) and the first P and S arrivals. The results shows that the Moho is thinner beneath the Shillong Plateau about 35–38 km and is the deepest beneath the Brahmaputra valley to the north about 39–41 km, deeper by 4–5 km compared to the Shillong Plateau with simultaneous observation of thinnest crust (∼33 km) in the western part of the Shillong Plateau in the Garo Hills Region.

Saurabh Baruah – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Estimation of Source Parameters of Local Earthquakes Originated in Shillong-Mikir Plateau and its Adjoining Region of Northeastern India
    Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 2013
    Co-Authors: Dipok K. Bora, Saurabh Baruah, Rajib Biswas, N. Gogoi
    Abstract:

    Abstract We estimate the source parameters (seismic moment, source radius, stress drop, and source displacement) and scaling laws for local earthquakes that occurred in the Shillong–Mikir plateau, Assam Valley, and Arunachal Himalaya in northeast India during 2001–2008. The source parameters were determined using the spectral analysis of P waves from the vertical component seismograms, after correction for attenuation. Seismic moments are observed within the range from 9.51×10 12 to ; stress drop ranges from 4×10 5 to 9×10 7   Pa for the Brune model and 7×10 5 to 1×10 8   Pa for the Madariaga model. Seismic events in this study are prominent with an average stress drop of 0.1–10 MPa. The effect of site geology may be a contributing factor for such a variation in stress drop. Source dimensions are, however, found to be smaller within the major part of the plateau. It is suggested that local earthquakes in the Region are associated with a brittle shear‐failure mechanism on fault segments and/or the presence of weakened zones, and earthquakes are triggered by low deviatoric stress. Empirical relations between M w – M L and M 0 – M L are developed leading to the future prediction of calibration coefficients for the local earthquakes in the Shillong–Mikir plateau and its Adjoining Region. Online Material: Tables of source parameters.

  • mapping the crustal thickness in shillong mikir hills plateau and its Adjoining Region of northeastern india using moho reflected waves
    Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, 2012
    Co-Authors: Dipok K. Bora, Saurabh Baruah
    Abstract:

    Abstract In this study we have tried to detect and collect later phases associated with Moho discontinuity and used them to study the lateral variations of the crustal thickness in Shillong–Mikir Hills Plateau and its Adjoining Region of northeastern India. We use the inversion algorithm by Nakajima et al. (Nakajima, J., Matsuzawa, T., Hasegawa, A. 2002. Moho depth variation in the central part of northeastern Japan estimated from reflected and converted waves. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 130, 31–47), having epicentral distance ranging from 60 km to 150 km. Taking the advantage of high quality broadband data now available in northeast India, we have detected 1607 Moho reflected phases (PmP and SmS) from 300 numbers of shallow earthquake events (depth ⩽ 25 km) in Shillong–Mikir Hills Plateau and its Adjoining Region. Notably for PmP phase, this could be identified within 0.5–2.3 s after the first P-arrival. In case of SmS phase, the arrival times are observed within 1.0–4.2 s after the first S-arrival. We estimated the crustal thickness in the study area using travel time difference between the later phases (PmP and SmS) and the first P and S arrivals. The results shows that the Moho is thinner beneath the Shillong Plateau about 35–38 km and is the deepest beneath the Brahmaputra valley to the north about 39–41 km, deeper by 4–5 km compared to the Shillong Plateau with simultaneous observation of thinnest crust (∼33 km) in the western part of the Shillong Plateau in the Garo Hills Region.

  • Mapping the crustal thickness in Shillong–Mikir Hills Plateau and its Adjoining Region of northeastern India using Moho reflected waves
    Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, 2012
    Co-Authors: Dipok K. Bora, Saurabh Baruah
    Abstract:

    Abstract In this study we have tried to detect and collect later phases associated with Moho discontinuity and used them to study the lateral variations of the crustal thickness in Shillong–Mikir Hills Plateau and its Adjoining Region of northeastern India. We use the inversion algorithm by Nakajima et al. (Nakajima, J., Matsuzawa, T., Hasegawa, A. 2002. Moho depth variation in the central part of northeastern Japan estimated from reflected and converted waves. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 130, 31–47), having epicentral distance ranging from 60 km to 150 km. Taking the advantage of high quality broadband data now available in northeast India, we have detected 1607 Moho reflected phases (PmP and SmS) from 300 numbers of shallow earthquake events (depth ⩽ 25 km) in Shillong–Mikir Hills Plateau and its Adjoining Region. Notably for PmP phase, this could be identified within 0.5–2.3 s after the first P-arrival. In case of SmS phase, the arrival times are observed within 1.0–4.2 s after the first S-arrival. We estimated the crustal thickness in the study area using travel time difference between the later phases (PmP and SmS) and the first P and S arrivals. The results shows that the Moho is thinner beneath the Shillong Plateau about 35–38 km and is the deepest beneath the Brahmaputra valley to the north about 39–41 km, deeper by 4–5 km compared to the Shillong Plateau with simultaneous observation of thinnest crust (∼33 km) in the western part of the Shillong Plateau in the Garo Hills Region.

Thomas H. Painter – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • episodic dust events of utah s wasatch front and Adjoining Region
    Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 2012
    Co-Authors: James W Steenburgh, Jeffrey D. Massey, Thomas H. Painter
    Abstract:

    AbstractEpisodic dust events cause hazardous air quality along Utah’s Wasatch Front and dust loading of the snowpack in the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This paper presents a climatology of episodic dust events of the Wasatch Front and Adjoining Region that is based on surface weather observations from the Salt Lake City International Airport (KSLC), Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) imagery, and additional meteorological datasets. Dust events at KSLC—defined as any day [mountain standard time (MST)] with at least one report of a dust storm, blowing dust, and/or dust in suspension with a visibility of 10 km or less—average 4.3 per water year (WY: October–September), with considerable interannual variability and a general decline in frequency during the 1930–2010 observational record. The distributions of monthly dust-event frequency and total dust flux are bimodal, with primary and secondary maxima in April and September, respectively. Dust reports are most common in the late afterno…

  • Episodic Dust Events of Utah’s Wasatch Front and Adjoining Region
    Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 2012
    Co-Authors: W. James Steenburgh, Jeffrey D. Massey, Thomas H. Painter
    Abstract:

    AbstractEpisodic dust events cause hazardous air quality along Utah’s Wasatch Front and dust loading of the snowpack in the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This paper presents a climatology of episodic dust events of the Wasatch Front and Adjoining Region that is based on surface weather observations from the Salt Lake City International Airport (KSLC), Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) imagery, and additional meteorological datasets. Dust events at KSLC—defined as any day [mountain standard time (MST)] with at least one report of a dust storm, blowing dust, and/or dust in suspension with a visibility of 10 km or less—average 4.3 per water year (WY: October–September), with considerable interannual variability and a general decline in frequency during the 1930–2010 observational record. The distributions of monthly dust-event frequency and total dust flux are bimodal, with primary and secondary maxima in April and September, respectively. Dust reports are most common in the late afterno…

B P Kashyap – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

N. Gogoi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Estimation of Source Parameters of Local Earthquakes Originated in Shillong-Mikir Plateau and its Adjoining Region of Northeastern India
    Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 2013
    Co-Authors: Dipok K. Bora, Saurabh Baruah, Rajib Biswas, N. Gogoi
    Abstract:

    Abstract We estimate the source parameters (seismic moment, source radius, stress drop, and source displacement) and scaling laws for local earthquakes that occurred in the Shillong–Mikir plateau, Assam Valley, and Arunachal Himalaya in northeast India during 2001–2008. The source parameters were determined using the spectral analysis of P waves from the vertical component seismograms, after correction for attenuation. Seismic moments are observed within the range from 9.51×10 12 to ; stress drop ranges from 4×10 5 to 9×10 7   Pa for the Brune model and 7×10 5 to 1×10 8   Pa for the Madariaga model. Seismic events in this study are prominent with an average stress drop of 0.1–10 MPa. The effect of site geology may be a contributing factor for such a variation in stress drop. Source dimensions are, however, found to be smaller within the major part of the plateau. It is suggested that local earthquakes in the Region are associated with a brittle shear‐failure mechanism on fault segments and/or the presence of weakened zones, and earthquakes are triggered by low deviatoric stress. Empirical relations between M w – M L and M 0 – M L are developed leading to the future prediction of calibration coefficients for the local earthquakes in the Shillong–Mikir plateau and its Adjoining Region. Online Material: Tables of source parameters.