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Adrenergic Beta-Antagonist

The Experts below are selected from a list of 18 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

D Catanzariti – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Sexual dysfunction related to drugs: a critical review. Part IV: cardiovascular drugs.
    Pharmacopsychiatry, 2014
    Co-Authors: A La Torre, G Giupponi, D Duffy, A Conca, D Catanzariti

    Abstract:

    Sexual dysfunction is a potential side effect of cardiovascular drugs: this article is a critical review of the current literature. Many studies have been published on this topic. Most of these studies are not methodologically robust, few are RCTs and most did not use a validated rating scale to evaluate sexual functioning. In addition, other methodological flaws limit greatly the conclusions of these studies. Most studies relate to male populations and only a few have been conducted on women. Also, the majority of studies on sexual dysfunction induced by cardiovascular drugs relate to antihypertensive drugs. While there is evidence to suggest that older antihypertensive drugs (diuretics, beta-blockers, centrally acting agents) have a negative impact on erectile function, newer agents seem to have either neutral (ACE inhibitors, calcium antagonists) or beneficial effects (i. e., angiotensin receptor blockers, nebivolol). Other cardiovascular drugs analyzed in this review also appear to have an inhibitory action on sexual function. For men, there is some weak evidence supporting the use of specific treatment strategies for sexual dysfunction associated with these drugs.
    This study was conducted in 2014 using the paper and electronic resources of the library of the “Azienda Provinciale per i Servizi Sanitari (APSS)” in Trento, Italy (http://atoz.ebsco.com/Titles/2793). The library has access to a wide range of databases including DYNAMED, MEDLINE Full Text, CINAHL Plus Full Text, The Cochrane Library, Micromedex healthcare series, BMJ Clinical Evidence. The full list of available journals can be viewed at http://atoz.ebsco.com/Titles/2793 or at the APSS web site (http://www.apss.tn.it). In completing this review, a literature search was conducted using the key words “cardiovascular”, “Adrenergic beta antagonist”, “α1-adrenoceptor antagonist”, “angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor”, “angiotensin receptor antagonist”, “angiotensin receptor blocker”, “beta blocker”, “beta receptor antagonist”, “calcium channel blocker”, “diuretic”, “antihypertensive”, “sexual dysfunction”, “sexual side effects”, “treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction”. All resulting listed articles were reviewed.
    The review includes studies that investigated the relationship between these drug treatments and sexual dysfunction. The purpose was to identify possible intervention strategies for sexual dysfunction related to these drugs.
    © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  • Sexual Dysfunction Related to Drugs: A Critical Review. Part IV: Cardiovascular Drugs
    Pharmacopsychiatry, 2014
    Co-Authors: A La Torre, G Giupponi, D Duffy, A Conca, D Catanzariti

    Abstract:

    Introduction: Sexual dysfunction is a potential side effect of cardiovascular drugs: this article is a critical review of the current literature. Many studies have been published on this topic. Most of these studies are not methodologically robust, few are RCTs and most did not use a validated rating scale to evaluate sexual functioning. In addition, other methodological flaws limit greatly the conclusions of these studies. Most studies relate to male populations and only a few have been conducted on women. Also, the majority of studies on sexual dysfunction induced by cardiovascular drugs relate to antihypertensive drugs. While there is evidence to suggest that older antihypertensive drugs (diuretics, beta-blockers, centrally acting agents) have a negative impact on erectile function, newer agents seem to have either neutral (ACE inhibitors, calcium antagonists) or beneficial effects (i. e., angiotensin receptor blockers, nebivolol). Other cardiovascular drugs analyzed in this review also appear to have an inhibitory action on sexual function. For men, there is some weak evidence supporting the use of specific treatment strategies for sexual dysfunction associated with these drugs. Methods: This study was conducted in 2014 using the paper and electronic resources of the library of the “Azienda Provinciale per i Servizi Sanitari (APSS)” in Trento, Italy ( http://atoz.ebsco.com/Titles/2793 ). The library has access to a wide range of databases including DYNAMED, MEDLINE Full Text, CINAHL Plus Full Text, The Cochrane Library, Micromedex healthcare series, BMJ Clinical Evidence. The full list of available journals can be viewed at http://atoz.ebsco.com/Titles/2793 or at the APSS web site ( http://www.apss.tn.it ). In completing this review, a literature search was conducted using the key words “cardiovascular”, “Adrenergic beta antagonist”, “α1-adrenoceptor antagonist”, “angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor”, “angiotensin receptor antagonist”, “angiotensin receptor blocker”, “beta blocker”, “beta receptor antagonist”, “calcium channel blocker”, “diuretic”, “antihypertensive”, “sexual dysfunction”, “sexual side effects”, “treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction”. All resulting listed articles were reviewed. Conclusion: The review includes studies that investigated the relationship between these drug treatments and sexual dysfunction. The purpose was to identify possible intervention strategies for sexual dysfunction related to these drugs.

A La Torre – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Sexual dysfunction related to drugs: a critical review. Part IV: cardiovascular drugs.
    Pharmacopsychiatry, 2014
    Co-Authors: A La Torre, G Giupponi, D Duffy, A Conca, D Catanzariti

    Abstract:

    Sexual dysfunction is a potential side effect of cardiovascular drugs: this article is a critical review of the current literature. Many studies have been published on this topic. Most of these studies are not methodologically robust, few are RCTs and most did not use a validated rating scale to evaluate sexual functioning. In addition, other methodological flaws limit greatly the conclusions of these studies. Most studies relate to male populations and only a few have been conducted on women. Also, the majority of studies on sexual dysfunction induced by cardiovascular drugs relate to antihypertensive drugs. While there is evidence to suggest that older antihypertensive drugs (diuretics, beta-blockers, centrally acting agents) have a negative impact on erectile function, newer agents seem to have either neutral (ACE inhibitors, calcium antagonists) or beneficial effects (i. e., angiotensin receptor blockers, nebivolol). Other cardiovascular drugs analyzed in this review also appear to have an inhibitory action on sexual function. For men, there is some weak evidence supporting the use of specific treatment strategies for sexual dysfunction associated with these drugs.
    This study was conducted in 2014 using the paper and electronic resources of the library of the “Azienda Provinciale per i Servizi Sanitari (APSS)” in Trento, Italy (http://atoz.ebsco.com/Titles/2793). The library has access to a wide range of databases including DYNAMED, MEDLINE Full Text, CINAHL Plus Full Text, The Cochrane Library, Micromedex healthcare series, BMJ Clinical Evidence. The full list of available journals can be viewed at http://atoz.ebsco.com/Titles/2793 or at the APSS web site (http://www.apss.tn.it). In completing this review, a literature search was conducted using the key words “cardiovascular”, “Adrenergic beta antagonist”, “α1-adrenoceptor antagonist”, “angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor”, “angiotensin receptor antagonist”, “angiotensin receptor blocker”, “beta blocker”, “beta receptor antagonist”, “calcium channel blocker”, “diuretic”, “antihypertensive”, “sexual dysfunction”, “sexual side effects”, “treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction”. All resulting listed articles were reviewed.
    The review includes studies that investigated the relationship between these drug treatments and sexual dysfunction. The purpose was to identify possible intervention strategies for sexual dysfunction related to these drugs.
    © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  • Sexual Dysfunction Related to Drugs: A Critical Review. Part IV: Cardiovascular Drugs
    Pharmacopsychiatry, 2014
    Co-Authors: A La Torre, G Giupponi, D Duffy, A Conca, D Catanzariti

    Abstract:

    Introduction: Sexual dysfunction is a potential side effect of cardiovascular drugs: this article is a critical review of the current literature. Many studies have been published on this topic. Most of these studies are not methodologically robust, few are RCTs and most did not use a validated rating scale to evaluate sexual functioning. In addition, other methodological flaws limit greatly the conclusions of these studies. Most studies relate to male populations and only a few have been conducted on women. Also, the majority of studies on sexual dysfunction induced by cardiovascular drugs relate to antihypertensive drugs. While there is evidence to suggest that older antihypertensive drugs (diuretics, beta-blockers, centrally acting agents) have a negative impact on erectile function, newer agents seem to have either neutral (ACE inhibitors, calcium antagonists) or beneficial effects (i. e., angiotensin receptor blockers, nebivolol). Other cardiovascular drugs analyzed in this review also appear to have an inhibitory action on sexual function. For men, there is some weak evidence supporting the use of specific treatment strategies for sexual dysfunction associated with these drugs. Methods: This study was conducted in 2014 using the paper and electronic resources of the library of the “Azienda Provinciale per i Servizi Sanitari (APSS)” in Trento, Italy ( http://atoz.ebsco.com/Titles/2793 ). The library has access to a wide range of databases including DYNAMED, MEDLINE Full Text, CINAHL Plus Full Text, The Cochrane Library, Micromedex healthcare series, BMJ Clinical Evidence. The full list of available journals can be viewed at http://atoz.ebsco.com/Titles/2793 or at the APSS web site ( http://www.apss.tn.it ). In completing this review, a literature search was conducted using the key words “cardiovascular”, “Adrenergic beta antagonist”, “α1-adrenoceptor antagonist”, “angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor”, “angiotensin receptor antagonist”, “angiotensin receptor blocker”, “beta blocker”, “beta receptor antagonist”, “calcium channel blocker”, “diuretic”, “antihypertensive”, “sexual dysfunction”, “sexual side effects”, “treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction”. All resulting listed articles were reviewed. Conclusion: The review includes studies that investigated the relationship between these drug treatments and sexual dysfunction. The purpose was to identify possible intervention strategies for sexual dysfunction related to these drugs.

D Duffy – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Sexual dysfunction related to drugs: a critical review. Part IV: cardiovascular drugs.
    Pharmacopsychiatry, 2014
    Co-Authors: A La Torre, G Giupponi, D Duffy, A Conca, D Catanzariti

    Abstract:

    Sexual dysfunction is a potential side effect of cardiovascular drugs: this article is a critical review of the current literature. Many studies have been published on this topic. Most of these studies are not methodologically robust, few are RCTs and most did not use a validated rating scale to evaluate sexual functioning. In addition, other methodological flaws limit greatly the conclusions of these studies. Most studies relate to male populations and only a few have been conducted on women. Also, the majority of studies on sexual dysfunction induced by cardiovascular drugs relate to antihypertensive drugs. While there is evidence to suggest that older antihypertensive drugs (diuretics, beta-blockers, centrally acting agents) have a negative impact on erectile function, newer agents seem to have either neutral (ACE inhibitors, calcium antagonists) or beneficial effects (i. e., angiotensin receptor blockers, nebivolol). Other cardiovascular drugs analyzed in this review also appear to have an inhibitory action on sexual function. For men, there is some weak evidence supporting the use of specific treatment strategies for sexual dysfunction associated with these drugs.
    This study was conducted in 2014 using the paper and electronic resources of the library of the “Azienda Provinciale per i Servizi Sanitari (APSS)” in Trento, Italy (http://atoz.ebsco.com/Titles/2793). The library has access to a wide range of databases including DYNAMED, MEDLINE Full Text, CINAHL Plus Full Text, The Cochrane Library, Micromedex healthcare series, BMJ Clinical Evidence. The full list of available journals can be viewed at http://atoz.ebsco.com/Titles/2793 or at the APSS web site (http://www.apss.tn.it). In completing this review, a literature search was conducted using the key words “cardiovascular”, “Adrenergic beta antagonist”, “α1-adrenoceptor antagonist”, “angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor”, “angiotensin receptor antagonist”, “angiotensin receptor blocker”, “beta blocker”, “beta receptor antagonist”, “calcium channel blocker”, “diuretic”, “antihypertensive”, “sexual dysfunction”, “sexual side effects”, “treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction”. All resulting listed articles were reviewed.
    The review includes studies that investigated the relationship between these drug treatments and sexual dysfunction. The purpose was to identify possible intervention strategies for sexual dysfunction related to these drugs.
    © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  • Sexual Dysfunction Related to Drugs: A Critical Review. Part IV: Cardiovascular Drugs
    Pharmacopsychiatry, 2014
    Co-Authors: A La Torre, G Giupponi, D Duffy, A Conca, D Catanzariti

    Abstract:

    Introduction: Sexual dysfunction is a potential side effect of cardiovascular drugs: this article is a critical review of the current literature. Many studies have been published on this topic. Most of these studies are not methodologically robust, few are RCTs and most did not use a validated rating scale to evaluate sexual functioning. In addition, other methodological flaws limit greatly the conclusions of these studies. Most studies relate to male populations and only a few have been conducted on women. Also, the majority of studies on sexual dysfunction induced by cardiovascular drugs relate to antihypertensive drugs. While there is evidence to suggest that older antihypertensive drugs (diuretics, beta-blockers, centrally acting agents) have a negative impact on erectile function, newer agents seem to have either neutral (ACE inhibitors, calcium antagonists) or beneficial effects (i. e., angiotensin receptor blockers, nebivolol). Other cardiovascular drugs analyzed in this review also appear to have an inhibitory action on sexual function. For men, there is some weak evidence supporting the use of specific treatment strategies for sexual dysfunction associated with these drugs. Methods: This study was conducted in 2014 using the paper and electronic resources of the library of the “Azienda Provinciale per i Servizi Sanitari (APSS)” in Trento, Italy ( http://atoz.ebsco.com/Titles/2793 ). The library has access to a wide range of databases including DYNAMED, MEDLINE Full Text, CINAHL Plus Full Text, The Cochrane Library, Micromedex healthcare series, BMJ Clinical Evidence. The full list of available journals can be viewed at http://atoz.ebsco.com/Titles/2793 or at the APSS web site ( http://www.apss.tn.it ). In completing this review, a literature search was conducted using the key words “cardiovascular”, “Adrenergic beta antagonist”, “α1-adrenoceptor antagonist”, “angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor”, “angiotensin receptor antagonist”, “angiotensin receptor blocker”, “beta blocker”, “beta receptor antagonist”, “calcium channel blocker”, “diuretic”, “antihypertensive”, “sexual dysfunction”, “sexual side effects”, “treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction”. All resulting listed articles were reviewed. Conclusion: The review includes studies that investigated the relationship between these drug treatments and sexual dysfunction. The purpose was to identify possible intervention strategies for sexual dysfunction related to these drugs.